Tag Archives: staff

Gritting

How gritting works

The University of Kent’s Landscape Management team are always up early and working hard to keep the campus safe and serviceable for all. During icy weather, they grit the campus roads and footpaths to reduce the risk of accidents to staff, students, and visitors.

What many people do not realise is, there is a fine art to gritting. Timing is everything. If you go too early, you waste the grit, because it lands on a dry road and is blown away by the displaced air as vehicles drive past. If it is raining heavily then it just washes away. Ideally the grit goes down on a damp surface and starts to stick, but if you are too late the surface is already frozen and the salt has to work harder to be effective but it will prevent big sheets of ice forming.

The salt is hygroscopic which means that it attracts moisture from the air and it only becomes activated when it is ‘trafficked’. When the grit is driven over the salt grinds down and mixes with the moisture it attracts and becomes the ideal brine, a salty water, which is when it is most effective.

Similar to how local authorities manage gritting, the Estates department will grit all University of Kent roads and main footpaths before starting on other areas across the campuses. Further information on the prioritised primary routes can be found on Goggle Maps.

For more information see the University’s Snow and Ice Policy.

Highway Code Updates image

Changes to the Highway Code 2021

The rules in the Highway code are being updated for 2021 to improve road safety for cyclists, pedestrians and horse riders. There will be further changes made to the Code between September 2021 and February 2022.

It is vital to stay up to date with the Highway Code and it is easy to keep updated online:

  • GOV.UK provides a list of the latest Highway Code updates and let’s you see what has been amended. It also allows you to search for key words and phrases within The Highway Code,quickly move between related rules, follow links to the original laws that the rules are based on and print sections.
  • You can also sign up for email alerts and be notified whenever the Highway Code is being updated.
  • Follow @HighwayCodeGB on Twitter or Facebook for news of any updates and regular road safety reminders.
  • There is also the Official Highway Code app.
A2 road closure banner image

Section of A2 near Canterbury will be closed all weekend, for eight weeks running

From 3rd September, Highways England are closing the road known as the A2 between Canterbury and Brenley Corner, Faversham roundabout from 7pm Friday to 5am Monday for 8 weekends in a row.

Ensure you plan your journey before leaving to travel to the University of Kent, Canterbury campus. During this time for those driving around the city, there is likely to be a slight increase in local traffic as vehicles join the diversions from either the Wincheap or Bridge Interchange junctions.

Friday 3rd September to 13th September, including KMMS students arrivals

A2 road will be closed from Brenley Corner roundabout, Faversham to Canterbury.

We recommend drivers visiting or arriving at the Canterbury campus consider exiting the A299 at Whitstable B2205/ Canterbury A290 junction and follow signs towards Canterbury until they have reached University Road.

The Kent County Council official signed diversion is via A299 to St Nicholas roundabout then use A28 into Canterbury, via Sturry. We advise lorries to use this route.

From 17 September for 5 weekends, including Arrivals weekend and Open day events

A2 road will be closed from Canterbury to Brenley Corner, Faversham roundabout.

We recommend drivers leaving Canterbury campus consider:

  • To turn right out of campus following the signs to Whitstable using the A290 then join the Thanet Way A299 or
  • travel into Canterbury City to Wincheap roundabout and turn right onto the A28 towards Challock and use the A251 back to the M2 or
  • travel into Canterbury City to Wincheap roundabout and turn right onto the A28 towards into Ashford and join the M20.

Student Arrivals – If travelling by car, please inform your driver to plan for this road closure. The A2 will be open on your way to campus but local roads may be busy. When leaving the campus the A2 exiting Canterbury towards the M2 will be closed.

UPDATE: 22 September 2021

We have been informed that there are road closures into Canterbury and out of Canterbury when using the A2 over the next 4 weeks. Please see our updated guidance below.

Travelling into Canterbury

The A2 slip road that is sign posted Canterbury/Harbledown will be closed.

We recommend to use the A299 and A290:

  • to continue on the M2 past junction 7, following signs for the A299 (Margate/Ramsgate).
  • Exit the A299 at the Blean/Seasalter/Chestfield junction.
  • Then follow the signs directing you to Blean onto the A290. This road leads directly to the University campus (approximately 4 miles).

If you are using the A2 towards Dover follow the official diversion signs to continue along the A2 to the A2050 Bridge interchange then follow the New Dover Road back into Canterbury.

Travelling from Canterbury to London or Faversham/Thanet

A2 road will be closed from Canterbury to Brenley Corner, Faversham roundabout. We recommend drivers leaving Canterbury campus consider:

  • To turn right out of campus following the signs to Whitstable using the A290 then join the Thanet Way A299 or
  • travel into Canterbury City to Wincheap roundabout and turn right onto the A28 towards Challock and use the A251 back to the M2 or
  • travel into Canterbury City to Wincheap roundabout and turn right onto the A28 towards into Ashford and join the M20
  • If travelling to Thanet to use the official Highways diversion signs from Canterbury.

If travelling by car, please inform your driver to plan for this road closure. The A2 will be open on your way to campus but local roads may be busy. When leaving the campus the A2 exiting Canterbury towards the M2 will be closed.

Useful links:
Kent County Council road closure

Highways England Travel Updates

University Planning your Journey Advice

Cycle to Work Scheme

Cycling is good for health and fitness; it’s beneficial to the environment and is a quick, cheap mode of transport in urban areas.

The Staff Cycle to Work Scheme offers employees the opportunity to purchase a brand new bike and accessories from a range of participating local stores at a discounted rate. You will also save on Income Tax and National Insurance contributions, against the cost of the bike, and can even spread the cost over a 12 or 18 month period.

In order to qualify, you must use the bike for at least 50% of your journeys to and from work. To find out if you are eligible visit the staff finance page.

The cycle scheme provided by www.cyclescheme.co.uk means the purchase hire value has been extended above the previous £1,000 limit. This change in scheme enables employees to continue enjoying the benefits of a cycle to work scheme arrangement with the opportunity to hire a bicycle plus relevant safety equipment up to the value of £3,000 as a tax-free benefit, through a salary sacrifice arrangement; employees take a reduced gross salary during the hire period thus making savings by paying reduced income tax and national insurance contributions.

Some common FAQ’s can be found on the Employee answers – Cyclescheme Knowledge Base

Please also remember if you are cycling to, from, or around the campus be bright and be seen. Make sure you are visible to motorists. For more information, hints and tips check out the roadwise website.

Campus Shuttle: the new booking system

The Campus Shuttle is an important service which connects the Medway and Canterbury campuses for staff and students, so we want to make it as efficient as possible. Therefore, The King’s Ferry have been working with ‘Mobile Onboard’ to improve the booking system.

You can now book a seat in advance. Booking a ticket to and from any bus stop, cancelling bookings, viewing all tickets and timetables is quick and easy. Please see our step by step guide on how to book, view and cancel tickets below, it only takes a minute!

To book your seat: 

  1. Book a seat on My Mobile Tickets from your desktop, tablet, or mobile phone.
  2. Log in using your University of Kent details. The first time you register you will be asked to confirm your email and mobile number.
  3. Choose the directions and the date of travel for your journey and select ‘Search Buses’.
  4. A timetable of the scheduled services will appear, click ‘select’ for the scheduled service in which you wish to book. Check your booking details are correct and press ‘Book Now’.
  5. On your checkout page, confirm that you agree with the storage and handling of your data by this website and press ‘Place order’.

To view your bookings and get mobile ticket:

  1. Go to My Mobile Tickets at the top of the page, next to the University of Kent logo, select the three horizontal lines and then select the option My Bookings’.
  2. A table will appear with all your bookings displayed, if you scroll across to the 6th column you will see the status of your booking.
  3. In the 7th column of the table, select ‘Get Mobile Ticket’ to access your ticket for boarding.  You can either print your ticket, or show it on your smartphone when you board the shuttle. Please do not take a photo or screenshot of your ticket, as this can cause issues with the scanner and you may not be able to board.

Please remember to cancel your booking if you no longer require it, so we are able to offer the seat to another commuter. To cancel your seat: 

  1. Go to ‘My bookings’ at the top of the page next to the University of Kent logo.
  2. In your bookings table, swipe across to the 7th (last) column titled ‘Action’ and select ‘Cancel Booking’.

Please note: You can also track the shuttle.

 

face covering image

Planning your commute

It is important to plan your journey, especially at the moment to prevent the spread of COVID-19. Here are some tips from the University’s Transport Team.

  • Plan all your journeys before leaving your house.
  • Make sure you bring a face covering (unless you are exempt) and hand sanitiser with you. The Government has also provided a useful checklist that includes questions to ask yourself and what
  • to take with you before leaving home.
  • Be prepared for travel disruptions. For example, due to lower capacity, the bus you were expecting to catch may be full and you may need to wait for longer than anticipated.
  • Ensure your vehicle/bicycle is serviced regularly.
  • Social distance and follow the travel providers’ rules.
  • Ensure you know what payment methods travel providers require.
  • Be familiar with and follow the Government travel guidance.
  • Avoid travel during busy times, if possible.
  • Keep up to date with the latest advice from your travel service provider. See the list below for up to date guidance on public transport.
  • Remember to be kind and support each other – there are health reasons that mean not everyone is able to wear a face covering or may need to use a particular route that others are not able to use.

If you are travelling via public transport, it is important to ensure that you are familiar with what is required to travel with the service provider. For example, you are required to wear a face covering (if you can) when travelling on public transport or Campus Shuttle service. Some travel services may request card payment only and/or bookings only.

The travel providers have published some guides to explain their journey planning, social distancing and how to pay for travel:

For more information, please visit the COVID-19 travel webpage and the coronavirus information webpages.

Gritting

How gritting works

The University of Kent’s Landscape Management team are always up early and working hard to keep the campus safe and serviceable for all. During icy weather, they grit the campus roads and footpaths to reduce the risk of accidents to staff, students, and visitors.

What many people do not realise is, there is a fine art to gritting. Timing is everything. If you go too early, you waste the grit, because it lands on a dry road and is blown away by the displaced air as vehicles drive past. If it is raining heavily then it just washes away. Ideally the grit goes down on a damp surface and starts to stick, but if you are too late the surface is already frozen and the salt has to work harder to be effective but it will prevent big sheets of ice forming.

The salt is hygroscopic which means that it attracts moisture from the air and it only becomes activated when it is ‘trafficked’. When the grit is driven over the salt grinds down and mixes with the moisture it attracts and becomes the ideal brine, a salty water, which is when it is most effective.

Similar to how local authorities manage gritting, the Estates department will grit all University of Kent roads and main footpaths before starting on other areas across the campuses. For more information see the University’s Snow and Ice Policy.