Tag Archives: Estates

Sustainability successes at Kent

The 2017-18 Sustainability at Kent report which highlights the University’s sustainability successes has been jointly released by the Estates Department and Safety, Health and Environment Unit.

In March 2018 the University’s Vice-Chancellor and President, Professor Karen Cox, signed the United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals Education Accord on behalf of the University.

The Sustainability at Kent report gives examples of how as a university we are supporting each of the Sustainable Development Goals and demonstrates how sustainability is being embedded within each of the following areas:

  • Energy and water management
  • Waste and recycling
  • Biodiversity
  • Sustainable transport
  • Construction
  • Procurement
  • Sustainable food
  • Engagement
  • Community
  • Education for sustainable development

View the full report to learn more.

Cycle Shelter Maintenance

The University of Kent supports and encourages staff, students, and visitors in using bicycles as a means of transport to and from campus. To promote this initiative, the University has provided a number of designated cycle racks. To make sure all cycle shelters are maintained, Waste and Recycling are in the process of cleaning the shelters on campus. The work is expected to be completed before the start of the academic year.

Each shelter and cycle rack on campus has been numbered and a round metal disc has been installed beside it showing the number. The cycle map on our website has been updated with the numbers. When reporting an abandoned bicycle or requesting access, please quote the corresponding number for the shelter or rack.

For access to the cycle shelters, please come to the Security and Transport Centre, where we can grant access for all card access shelters, except those within Turing.

 

Understanding snow clearing

Snow ploughs only work effectively when snow is more than 5cm (2inches) deep. If snow fall reaches this level, Grounds Maintenance will use a combination of snow ploughs and other methods to clear the snow as snow ploughs cannot go over road humps or similar traffic calming measures.

Grit does not melt snow and therefore grit cannot be applied on top of deep snow. Refer to understanding gritting for more information on how gritting works.

Similar to how local authorities manage snow clearance, the Estates department will aim to clear all University of Kent roads and main footpaths before starting on other areas across the campuses. Please refer to the University’s Snow and Ice Policy for more information.

Understanding gritting

Timing is everything with gritting. If you go too early, you waste the grit, because it lands on a dry road and is blown away by the displaced air as vehicles drive past. If it is raining heavily then it just washes away. Ideally the grit goes down on a damp surface and starts to stick, but if you are too late the surface is already frozen and the salt has to work harder to be effective but it will prevent big sheets of ice forming.

The salt is hygroscopic which means that it attracts moisture from the air and it only becomes activated when it is ‘trafficked’. When the grit is driven over the salt grinds down and mixes with the moisture it attracts and becomes the ideal brine, a salty water, which is when it is most effective.

Similar to how local authorities manage gritting, the Estates department will grit all University of Kent roads and main footpaths before starting on other areas across the campuses. For more information see the University’s Snow and Ice Policy

Learn more about snow clearing.

Estates 24 hour cycle ride in Park Wood

Estates staff will be riding their bikes for 24 hours around Park Wood to raise money for the BLOODWISE cancer charity.

Hoath Court car park within Park Wood Courts will be closed to assist with the Estates 24 hour charity bike ride (14-16 July 2017). Please be particular mindful of cyclists in Park Wood during this time. The foot path between the Crab and Winkle Way, and Hothe Court Farm House will be closed to pedestrians.

If you would like to learn more or donate to the charity, see here: https://www.justgiving.com/fundraising/crankies24hcycle

Understanding Gritting

Timing is everything. If you go too early, you waste it, because it lands on a dry road and is blown away by the displaced air as vehicles drive past. If it is raining heavily (like yesterday afternoon) then it just washes away. Ideally it goes down on a damp surface and starts to stick, but if you are too late the surface is already frozen and the salt has to work harder to be effective but will prevent big sheets of ice forming.

The salt is hygroscopic which means that it attracts moisture from the air and it only becomes activated when it’s ‘trafficked’. So when it’s driven over the salt grinds down and mixes with the moisture it attracts and becomes the ideal brine, a salty water, which is when it is most effective.

Estates staff have all been working hard to ensure that the University can continue to operate during these adverse weather conditions. Please be aware that Canterbury campus is over 300 acres and has many walkways, steps, roads, car parks, accessible ramps and cycle routes. Similar to how local authorities manage gritting, we grit these areas according to their priority as not all areas can be covered at all times.

We would like to thank Grounds Maintenance at Canterbury campus and FM team at Medway campus for being on site last night and the early hours of this morning to make sure the priority roads and footpaths are gritted.