Tag Archives: Summer Music Week

Recognising outstanding contributions to University music: Music Prizes 2018

Towards the end of each academic year, the Music department takes the opportunity to recognise the outstanding contributions made by a few of those who have participated in music between September and June in an awards ceremony, held as part of Summer Music Week.

Left to right: Douglas Haycock, Lydia Cheng, Jasper Rose, Alice Baker, Charlotte Webb, Molly Richetta, Matthew Cooke

The Canterbury Festival Music Prize, awarded to a final-year student who has made an outstanding contribution to music, was awarded jointly to Lydia Cheng and Charlotte Webb. A final-year student reading Law, Lydia is a wonderfully talented violinist – indeed, she turned down music scholarships to both Berkeley and McGill to come to Kent! Such is her commitment and talent that she has lead the Symphony Orchestra for the last two years. She also plays in the String Sinfonia and has performed in chamber music lunchtime concerts. She is a Music Performance Scholar, studying with Floriane Peycelon and Kathy Shave, and has also been one of the Symphony Orchestra Assistants for the past two years. This year Lydia has been in great demand from other local orchestras to play in their concerts so has been an excellent ambassador for our music-making. Charlotte Webb is a final-year student reading Biomedical Science with a year abroad
Charlotte spent her third year in Canada and has certainly made the most of her final year back in Kent. She is a Music Performance Scholar, studying singing with Peter Cox, and sings in the University Chorus, Chamber Choir and Cecilian Choir. She has featured as soloist in many concerts, including our performances this year of Handel’s Messiah and Pergolesi’s Stabat Mater. And as well as all this, Charlotte has also played Principal Trumpet in the Symphony Orchestra this year, and acted as the Music Society Social Secretary, whose main role seems to be carting people off to K-Bar after rehearsals…

The students received their awards from Keith Mander, Chair of the Canterbury Festival and former Pro Vice Chancellor at the University.

The Colyer-Fergusson Music Prize, which is awarded in recognition of a student’s involvement in organising music at the University went to Alice Baker, a final-year student reading Wildlife Conservation. The award recognised her exceptional all-round behind-the-scenes organising and admin skills as the Chorus Manager this year – the issuing and returning of all the chorus members’ vocal scores for each major concert and liaising closely with the Music Department, no mean feat for a leviathan chorus numbering around 180 members! She is a Music Performance Scholar, studying singing with Juliet Schiemann, and sings in the University Chorus, Chamber Choir, Cecilian Choir, and the Lost Consort.

Alice was presented with her award by the Director of Music, Susan Wanless.

The University Music Prize is an award donated by Professor John Craven, a former Deputy Vice Chancellor at Kent, and is awarded to returning students who have made a major contribution to music throughout the year. This year, it was awarded jointly to Matthew Cooke and Molly Richetta. A second-year student studying French and Business Administration, Matt has certainly had a very busy year of music-making. He is the student conductor of the University Chamber Choir and was the musical director for the Musical Theatre Society’s production of Bonnie and Clyde in the Marlowe Studio. He also plays trumpet in the Concert Band and Big Band, and sings tenor in the University Chorus, Chamber Choir and Cecilian Choir. This year he has received a Music Performance Award to study singing with Peter Cox and was a soloist in both the December Choral Concert and in Messiah. In her second year studying Mathematics, Molly Richetta is a Music Performance Scholar and studies violin with Floriane Peycelon. She made the fatal mistake of telling us that she also plays viola (a rare breed!) so this year she has swapped between playing both instruments in the String Sinfonia, and has become a very accomplished leader of the viola section in the University Symphony Orchestra. Like Lydia, she has also been in great demand from other local orchestras to play in their concerts so has been an excellent ambassador for our music-making.

Both students were presented with their awards by  Professor April McMahon.

Finally, the David Humphreys Music Prize, which is awarded to a student who has made a particularly special music contribution, was awarded jointly to Douglas Haycock and Jasper Rose. A final -year student, reading Law, Douglas Haycock is a Music Performance Scholar, studying singing with Peter Cox, and sings in the University Chorus, Chamber Choir, Cecilian Choir and the Lost Consort. He has featured as soloist in many concerts, including the December Choral Concert and Messiah last term. He has just finished his year as President of the Music Society and also plays tenor saxophone in the Concert and Big Bands. It is particularly fitting that Doug is receiving this prize as he conducted the Chamber Choir in his second year and, thanks to the David Humphreys’ Music Fund, was able to go on a conducting course and have the opportunity to perform in Canterbury Cathedral’s crypt. Jasper Rose is a final-year reading Criminal Justice and Criminology on our Medway campus, and has played trombone in the National Youth Jazz Orchestra and is a Music Performance Scholar, receiving lessons with Geoff Mason. He is a really exceptional player, leading the trombone section in Concert Band and taking the spotlight in many improvised solos in the Big Band. He has also been principal first trombone in the University Symphony Orchestra for the past three years.

Douglas and Jasper received their awards from David’s daughters, Josephine Humphreys and Belinda Howard.

The Music Awards Committee has a difficult job in deciding which candidates in particular to recognise with awards, and this year was especially challenging with so many involved in our music-making across the year; our thanks both to the award-winners, and to the wider community of University musicians, students, staff and alumni, who have given so much of their time and enthusiasm in rehearsing and performing this year. What will next year bring…

Summer Music Week details are here

With the current weather promising the arrival of summer, blue skies and summer sunshine this morning greets the arrival of our new Summer Music Week brochures, to much excitement here in Colyer-Fergusson.

Our annual festival bidding a fond musical farewell to another year of music-making at Kent takes place this year from Friday 1 to Saturday 9 June; as you see, there’s so much packed in to this year’s celebrations that we’ve had to expand it to Summer Music (Just Over A) Week.

This year, #summermusicweek kicks off the with the University Chamber Choir and Consort in the Crypt of Canterbury Cathedral on Friday 1 June in a concert including Pergolesi’s dramatic Stabat Mater; that weekend also sees the Big Band heading out for its customary trip to the seaside for a performance on the Deal Memorial Bandstand at 2.30pm on Sunday 3 June. There then ensues a week of musical mayhem, including a Music Scholars Lunchtime Recital, the String Sinfonia, the usual roof-raising gala for the Concert and Big Bands, the Cecilian Choir and Sinfonia performing in the spacious acoustic of St Mary of Charity in Faversham, and other chamber ensembles performing, all of which culminates in the traditional Saturday Gala concert featuring the Chorus, Orchestra and Chamber Choir followed by cream teas and tears of farewell.

Find out all that’s to come on the online What’s On here, or download the new brochure here. You can also follow the events and the build-up to Summer Music Week on @ukcsummermusic on Twitter; grab your straw boater and parasol, and join us in our last musical hurrah before the curtain falls on what has already been a terrific year of music-making.

Music prizes recognise outstanding students during Summer Music Week

At the end of the academic year, it’s always a pleasure and a privilege to be able to recognise particular students for their outstanding contributions to music-making. During Summer Music Week, a public presentation takes place in which to acknowledge their participation and involvement in music with a number of prizes, and the occasion on Tuesday 6 June followed the Scholars’ Lunchtime Recital as part of the week’s event.

Music Prize winners 2017
Jenn Morgan

The Canterbury Festival Prize, presented by Festival Director Rosie Turner, awarded to to a final-year student who has made an outstanding contribution to music at the University, went to Jennifer Morgan, who has just finished reading French and Spanish. Jenn has been Principle double bass in Symphony Orchestra, bassist in Concert Band, star electric bassist for the Big Band, and our 1930s dance orchestra, General Harding’s Tomfoolery. Throughout her final two years, Jenn was a Music Performance Award holder, and was Social Media Representative on the Music Society Committee this year.

The Colyer-Fergusson Music Prize, awarded to a student who has made a major contribution to the organisation of music at the University, was presented jointly to Amy Poulter and Inger Kviseth.

Amy (right) with Tomfoolery

Amy is a final-year student reading Philosophy and English Language & Linguistics, and has been awarded the prize for her exceptional all-round behind-the-scenes organising and admin skills as Concert Band and Big Band Assistant, in which she plays alto saxophone. This involved liaising with the conductor, Ian Swatman, helping to set-up rehearsals and co-ordinating, circulating and collecting all the many sheets of music which go into the instruments folders (a somewhat arduous and thankless task – especially when they go missing!) She also had the mammoth task of running this year’s student battle-of-the bands event, Keynestock, in her capacity as College President.

Inger (left) rehearsing with the Chamber Choir

A final-year student reading Conflict, Peace and Security, Inger’s award recognised her role as Chamber Choir Assistant and Minerva Voices Assistant. She managed the running and the choral library for both choirs during this year, liaised with the choir members about rehearsals and performances and organised the catering during workshop days (which, as anyone who has ever worked with musicians will know, was very important!). She also organised a fund-raising carol-singing afternoon in aid of Cancer Research UK on a very cold December day. Her quiet, proactive efficiency has been a crucial part of the success of both choirs this year. Both students received their awards from the former Chair of the Colyer-Fergusson Charitable Trust, the Honourable Jonathan Monckton.

The John Craven Music Prize, awarded to a returning student who has a made a major contribution to music at the University this year,  was awarded jointly to Lydia Cheng and Jasper Rose.

Lydia Cheng

In her second year reading Law, Lydia is a wonderfully talented violinist – indeed, she turned down music scholarships to both Berkeley and McGill in order to come to Kent. Such is her commitment and talent that she was given the sole responsibility as leader of the Symphony Orchestra in the cathedral concert this year. She also plays in the String Sinfonia and gave a public lunchtime concert last term as part of a piano trio exploring the world of the tango. She is a Music Performance Scholar and is one of the Symphony Orchestra Assistants.

Jasper Rose (back centre)

Jasper is a second-year reading Criminal Justice and Criminology on our Medway campus, and trombonist who features prominently in both the Concert and Big Bands, as well as the Symphony Orchestra. Jasper also plays in the National Youth Jazz Orchestra and is a Music Performance Scholar. The students received their prizes from Patron of the Music Scholarships, Dame Anne Evans.

Where appropriate, the Music Awards Committee can also award the First-Year Prize,  to a student who has made a significant contribution to music-making during their first year of study. This year, the award went to Tom Wust, reading Business and Management on our Medway campus. Tom is Co-principal clarinet in the Symphony Orchestra  and in Concert Band, and tenor sax in Big Band and General Harding’s Tomfoolery. Tom is a Music Performance Scholar, and demonstrated his prowess in the Music Scholars’ concert with two movements from the fiendish Clarinet Sonata by Joseph Horovitz. Tom’s award was presented by Professor April McMahon.

Jonathan Butten (right)

This year, we were pleased to be able to award the cumbersomely-titled yet no less important Music Awards Committee Prize renamed as the David Humphreys Music Prize, in memory of David who was a terrific supporter of music at the University, and whose fund in memory of his wife, Julia, continues to support the annual Crypt Concert by the University Chamber Choir. The award recognises students who have made a special contribution to music at Kent, and this was awarded to three students jointly: Jonathan Butten, Faith Chan and Cory Adams.

Jonathan is a final -year student, reading Biomedical Sciences, and the prize was awarded for his outstanding contribution as Principal oboe and cor anglais in the Symphony Orchestra. Jonathan has been a remarkable woodwind player, performing in lunchtime concerts, and has been a University Music Performance Scholar, and this year acting as one of the Symphony Orchestra Assistants.

Faith Chan

In her final year reading Law,  Faith received her prize for her special contribution to University Music as a cellist. She is principal cellist in the Symphony Orchestra and Sinfonia and gave a public lunchtime concert last term with the Piazzolla piano trio. Her versatility meant she has also been a very fine continuo player, featuring in Baroque concerts and lunchtime performances over the course of her time at Kent. She is a Music Performance Scholar, and has also been one of the Symphony Orchestra Assistants.

Cory is Masters student reading Hispanic and Comparative Literature; he has been Principal timpanist and percussionist in Symphony Orchestra, and kit and percussion in Concert Band, Big Band and General Harding’s Tomfoolery. He is a University Music Performance Scholar and has just finished impressively organising (and exhausting!) everyone in his capacity as President of the Music Society. The three students received their prize from Chair of the Music Awards Committee and Reader in Biosciences, Dr Dan Lloyd.

Cory Adams

Music-making at Kent, as an extra-curricular activity, really does rely on the participation, commitment and enthusiasm of all the many students (and staff) who take part in rehearsals and performances on top of their studies during the academic year. The awards ceremony during Summer Music Week is an opportunity publically to recognise and to thank a few individuals for all that they contributed during their time at the University; our congratulations to everyone on their awards, and our gratitude for the part they have played in making the musical year at the University such a success.

Summer Music Week: Days One and Two

Our annual Summer Music Week festival launched in fine style over the weekend, as the Big Band headed to the seaside to perform on the Memorial Bandstand at Deal.

Big Band at the Beach!

Blue skies, clear weather and a great crowd greeted the players under the baton of Ian Swatman, with audience scattered on the greensward around the bandstand in deck-chairs and sun-hats.

Summertime and the livin’ is easy…

Day Two yesterday carried on the jazz theme, as General Harding’s Tomfoolery filled Colyer-Fergusson Hall with swing music from the 30s, 40s and 50s in Five O’Clock Stomp. The thirteen-piece dance orchestra were joined by The Minervettes, and unveiled an energy-filled programme of popular favourites including The Charleston, Puttin’ On The Ritz and classic Glenn Miller tunes.

Today, Day Three, sees a Lunchtime Recital by University Music Scholars in music by Piazzolla, Joseph Horovitz and Sonny Rollins at 1.10pm, followed by the presentation of the annual Music Prizes. Summer Music Week continues until Saturday; details here.

Music in the archives: Summer Music Week ancillary exhibition

With Summer Music Week set to launch this Sunday, we’re delighted to reveal that our colleagues over in Special Collections and Archives will be holding an open afternoon of music-related archive and rare materials as part of the festival on Wednesday 7 June in the Templeman Library.

To complement Summer Music Week, Special Collections & Archives invites you  to learn more about how music is represented, recorded and explored through its collections between 2-4pm that day. Visitors will be able to view a wide range of material including items from the John Crow Ballad and Song Collection, rare books from the Pre-1700 Collection, artwork held in the British Cartoon Archive, and alternative cabaret performances found in the British Stand-Up Comedy Archive, and much more.

You don’t need to book, just drop in on the day; we are hugely grateful to Joanna Baines, Senior Assistant in Special Collections and Archives, for putting this all together, a terrific enhancement as Summer Music Week unfurls next week.

Explore music in archive materials on Weds 7 June…

 

Band substance: the Concert and Big Bands

Depending upon what time you pass by Colyer-Fergusson on a Wednesday night, you’ll either hear stirring film scores such as Gladiator, swing classics by Count Basie or versions of Stevie Wonder tunes ringing out. It can only mean one thing: rehearsal night for the University Concert Band and Big Band (though thankfully not at the same time…)

On the conductor’s podium is the sprightly figure of Ian Swatman – Bob Marley devotee and possibly the most dedicated fan Hull City will ever have – vigorously taking charge of Wednesday rehearsals and leading the assembled forces through repertoire in preparation for their various termly concerts. In December, the Big Band can be found in Santa hats and jazz-infused versions of seasonal repertoire for the popular Christmas Swing-along, whilst both forces combine each March for their roof-raising Spring concert, and for a farewell concert each June.

Both national and international students, staff and members of the local community find themselves grappling with the complexity of the repertoire Ian hurls at them each year, as they sweat blood to get the music under the fingers. Each year, too, auditions are held for solo singers, for the opportunity to sing with the Big Band.

Phil Veacock (centre) and the Deptford Rivieras in the concert-hall

A particularly exciting aspect to the working life of the Big Band is the opportunity to work with guest musicians; in the past, this has included trombonist Mark Bassey, trumpeter Mike Lovatt from the John Wilson Orchestra, and saxophonist Phil Veacock from the Jools Holland Orchestra. It’s a great opportunity for the young stars of tomorrow to work with, and learn from, accomplished professional performers.

Mike Lovatt with members of the Big Band

The Concert Band has worked with composer James Rae too, when James was commissioned by the Music department to write a piece for the gala concert to open the Colyer-Fergusson Building in December 2012. As part of an action-packed weekend, the Concert Band gave the world premiere of James’ Platform One.

Composer James Rae (right) with Ian Swatman and the Concert Band

The groups don’t just perform in the adaptable acoustics of Colyer-Fergusson Hall. The Big Band also launches the annual Summer Music Week, a musical farewell to the University’s academic year, with a trip to the seaside to perform on the Memorial Bandstand at Deal, which involves combining rehearsals and coach-trips with a visit to the promenade chip shop and the roving ice-cream stand. (It’s a hard life…). The band has also headed down the road to perform alongside pupils at St Edmund’s School, and also in Whitefriars in the heart of the city.

Whether it’s epic film soundtracks, 70s funk, classic big band standards or soul ballads: Wednesday evenings certainly sound unlike any other on campus…

Outstanding contributions recognised at awards ceremony

One of the highlights of Summer Music Week is being able to recognise the outstanding contributions made by several students to music-making over the course of the year at the annual Music Awards ceremony.

Held after the Music Scholars’ Recital on the third day of Summer Music Week, this year the awards were excitingly scattered across the whole of the week-long music festival, as various prize-winners were away through either having the downright audacity to start gainful employment, illness or examinations – suffice to say, it made it much more fun, tracking the recipients down across the days, although it did afford the opportunity to sneak-present some of the prizes on the nominees at moments they hadn’t expected…

The Canterbury Festival Prize, which is awarded to a final-year student who has made an outstanding contribution to music at the University was this year awarded jointly to Music Performance Scholars Cory Adams and Anne Engels. Hispanic Studies student Cory has been principal timpanist with the Symphony Orchestra, one of four players in a performance of Berlioz’s Symphonie fantastique back in March, and has also been kit and percussion player with the Concert and Big Bands. Anne, studying English and American Literature and Philosophy, has played principal flute in the Symphony Orchestra and Concert Band, a member of the Flute Choir and was the featured soloist in a Harry Potter-themed lunchtime concert earlier this year. Both students received their awards from the Director of the Canterbury Festival, Rosie Turner.

Winner takes it all: Anne Engels; Faith Chan; Joe Prescott; Cory Adams;
Winner takes it all: Anne Engels; Faith Chan; Joe Prescott; Cory Adams;

The Colyer-Fergusson Music Prize, awarded to a student who has made a major contribution to organising music at the University, was awarded to India Bottomley, for her exceptional all-round, behind-the-scenes, kitchen-sink skills in administration and organisation as Chorus Manager. Having completed her degree in American Studies, India has already started employment in London, so we were especially delighted to be able to spring her award on her on the final day of Summer Music Week, when she came back to sing with the Cecilian Choir and Chorus.

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Chorus of approval: India Bottomley receives her award

Patron of the Music Scholarship Scheme, Dame Anne Evans, was present to award the John Craven Music Prize, which goes to a returning student who has made a major contribution to music at Kent. The prize was awarded jointly to Music Performance Scholars Charlotte Webb and Ruth Webster. It’s fitting that they should both be receiving this prize – both are Music Performance Singing Scholars and both in their second year, reading Biomedical Science. Both students have this year sung in the University Chorus, Minerva Voices and Cecilian Choir, featuring prominently as soloists throughout this year in major concerts in music by Handel, Lully and Vivaldi. Charlotte also plays trumpet in the Symphony Orchestra and Ruth is a member of the Musical Theatre Society show choir.

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Biosciene brilliance: Charlotte Webb, Ruth Webster and Jonathan Butten with patron Dame Anne Evans

The First-Year Prize went to trombonist and Music Performance Scholar, Jasper Rose, in recognition of someone who has made a significant contribution to music during their first year at the University. Reading Criminal Law on the Medway campus,Jasper has played in the Symphony Orchestra, the Concert Band, and has been the featured trombone-player in the Big Band this year. Jasper was unwell on the day of the ceremony, so again a lighting-strike presentation was unleashed at the rehearsal for the Concert and Big Band gala the following day; Jasper received his prize from the Director of Music, Susan Wanless.

Top brass: Jasper Rose receives his award
Top brass: Jasper Rose receives his award

The remarkably cumbersomely-titled (but no less valuable, for all that!) University Music Awards Committee Prize, for a student who has made a special contribution to music, ended up being a three-way split – the Committee has the unenviable task of allotting the prizes, and it’s often difficult to choose between nominees – between second-year woodwind player, Jonathan Butten, second-year cellist Faith Chan and final-year trumpeter and conductor, Joe Prescott. Each student is a Music Performance Scholar, and has in their way made a particularly valuable contribution – Jonathan (reading Biomedical Science) is principal oboist in the Symphony Orchestra, but the award was given to acknowledge his exceptional cor anglais playing in Symphonie fantastique in the Cathedral Concert, and as oboe soloist in concerts with the String Sinfonia in concerti by Vivaldi. A Law-reading cellist with the Symphony Orchestra and String Sinfonia, Faith’s prize recognises her immense skill as the solo continuo player in major performances of Baroque repertoire this year. Joe’s award is in honour of his contribution across so many areas of music – playing trumpet with the Concert and Big Band, his role as student conductor of Minerva Voices, and as Music Director for Musical Theatre Society showcases and productions. He has also sung with Chorus, Cecilian Choir and Chamber Choir, and is the outgoing President of the Music Society this year. He also played the Last Post for the annual Remembrance Day gathering. The prizes were presented by Chair of the Music Award Committe, Dr Dan Lloyd, and Dame Anne Evans.

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The award-winners together with violinist Lydia Cheng after the recital, together with patron Dame Anne Evans (l) and Canterbury Festival Director, Rosie Turner (r)

As host of the ceremony, Dan Lloyd, remarked, the prospect of yet another committee meeting isn’t necessarily one to lighten the spirit, but the annual convergence of the Music Awards Committee is one that is all about celebrating student success, recognising their achievements and the impact of their music-making throughout the year. This year has been a particularly fine one; many congratulations to the winners.

Images: Dr Wei-Feng Xue / Dan Harding