University Music Prizes 2019

One of the great pleasures of Summer Music Week is the opportunity publically both to recognise and to thank particular students for their outstanding contributions to music-making over the course of the academic year at the Music Prize ceremony. The annual presentation of prizes to worthy recipients takes place following the Music Scholars’ Lunchtime Recital, which showcases some of the talented students at the University each academic year.

The Canterbury Festival Music Prize, is awarded to a final-year student who has made an outstanding contribution to music at the University. This year, the prize was awarded jointly to flautist Robert Loveless and string-player Molly Richetta.

Flautist Robert Loveless

Robert was a final-year student reading Computer Science with a year in Industry, and has played flute and piccolo in the University Symphony Orchestra throughout his time at Kent and also played in the Concert Band and various flute ensembles. This year he was Principal Flautist in the Orchestra playing in all the major concerts, and was also the only student woodwind player in a recent performance of Prokofiev’s Peter and the Wolf – a fiendish flute part! Robert was a University Music Performance Scholar, studying with Rosemary Rathbone, and was Secretary of the student Music Society in his second year. He also sang bass in the University Chamber and Cecilian Choirs.

Multi-talented string-player, Molly Richetta

A final-year student reading Mathematics, Molly Richetta has been a Music Performance Scholar and studied with Floriane Peycelon. She is a highly accomplished player on both the violin and viola so for the past two years has moved between the two instruments, playing in the String Sinfonia and the University Symphony Orchestra – making her indispensable! She also played in a number of other ensembles and quartets this year and has a been in great demand from other local orchestras to play as a professional in their concerts – so has been an excellent ambassador for our music-making. Molly has just finished her year as Treasurer of the student Music Society. Both students received their prizes from the Director of the Canterbury Festival, Rosie Turner.

The Colyer-Fergusson Music Prize is awarded to a student who has made a major contribution to the organisation of music at the University, and this year’s winner was Tom Barton, a final-year student reading Politics and International Relations.

Tom Barton receiving his prize from the former Chair of the Colyer-Fergusson Trust, the Hon Jonathan Monckton

Tom played bass clarinet and saxophone in the University’s Concert Band and Big Band. He was one of the Assistants for these two groups, liaising with the conductor, Ian Swatman, helping to set-up rehearsals, and co-ordinating, circulating and collecting all the many sheets of music which go into the instrument folders. This prize particularly recognises Tom’s contribution to the smooth running of many of our major concerts. When not playing, he has volunteered to assist and steward at them, working quietly, politely and efficiently with the members of the public and Music Department staff and setting a great example to the other student stewards. Tom received his prize from the former Chair of the Colyer-Fergusson Charitable Trust, the Hon Jonathan Monckton.

The University of Kent Music Prize, which was presented by Professor John Craven, a former Deputy Vice Chancellor at the University, is awarded each to a returning student who has made a major contribution to music at the University this year. The prize was awarded jointly to Carmen Mackey, a second-year student studying Drama and Theatre, and to Leon Schoonderwoerd, in his second year of a PhD in Theoretical Physics. Carmen has had a very busy year as a singer. She was a member of the University Chorus, Chamber Choir, Cecilian Choir and the Minerva Voices, and was the Sorceress in our semi-staged performance of Purcell’s opera, Dido and Aeneas, in Colyer-Fergusson in February. She has been an extremely active member of the Musical Theatre Society and coached and performed in their recent successful production of Sondheim’s Company. Carmen was a Music Performance Scholar, studying with Juliet Schiemann.

This year, Leon Schoonderwoerd received a Music Performance Award to study clarinet with Ian Swatman. He was Co-Principal clarinettist in the University Symphony Orchestra, lead clarinettist in the Concert Band, and has formed a number of chamber ensembles. Leon also played timpani and percussion, performing in a number of concerts this year – including some very dramatic thunder in Dido and Aeneas… Both winners received their prizes from Professor Craven.

Professor John Craven presenting the prizes

Awarded to a student who has made a particularly special contribution to our music-making this year, the David Humphreys Music Prize was awarded jointly to Fleur Sumption (pictured below, left) and Helen Sotillo, both final-year students – and both sopranos!

Fleur Sumption and Helen Sotillo performing in Colyer-Fergusson Hall

Completing her postgraduate degree reading Law  (LLB Senior Status), Helen has sung in the University Chorus, Chamber Choir, Cecilian Choir and the Minerva Voices. She has featured as soloist in many concerts, including the December Choral Concert and last term she was Dido in the performance of Purcell’s Dido and Aeneas, to great acclaim. This year Helen has also been a highly efficient manager of the University Chorus, keeping both the music and its members in check, and plays bassoon in the Concert Band. She has been a Music Performance Scholar, studying singing with Linda Hirst.

Fleur Sumption was a final-year reading History of Art, and similarly has sung in the University Chorus, Chamber Choir, Cecilian Choir and the Minerva Voices. She has featured as soloist in many concerts, including the December Choral Concert and last term she was Belinda in the production of Dido and Aeneas. Fleur has also been one of the two vocalists in the University Big Band and when not singing plays alto saxophone. She has just completed her year as President of the student Music Society and as a Music Performance Scholar, studied singing with Juliet Schiemann. The two winners received their prizes from two of David Humphreys’ daughters, Josephine Humphreys and Belinda Howard, who were present at the ceremony.

First-year Elle Soo receiving her prize from Dame Anne Evans

The final prize, the University of Kent First-Year Music Prize, which is occasionally awarded to a student who has made a major contribution to music in their first year at Kent, was awarded to Elle Soo, in her first year of studying Social Anthropology.  At the start of each academic year we audition student vocalists for the University Big Band. Elle was only a few weeks into her time at Kent but immediately made a great impression and this year has starred along with Fleur in the Christmas Swing-along and the concert in March. She performed last Sunday with the Big Band in their annual very popular visit to the Deal Bandstand. She also featured in the  sell-out Summertime Swing event during Summer Music Week. Elle received her prize from Dame Anne Evans, patron of the University Music Scholarship Scheme and former international operatic soprano.

This year’s Music Prize Winners with Chair of the Music Prize Committe, Dr Dan Lloyd

The ceremony was presided over by Dr Dan Lloyd, Chair of the University Music Prize Committee and himself an orchestral instrumentalist. Our thanks to the invited guests, supporters, and prize-givers who attended the ceremony, and our congratulations to all the prize-winners.

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