Category Archives: Skills development

Train to Teach English

What is CELTA?

CELTA is an internationally recognised qualification, which provides you with the minimum entry level for the English language teaching profession.

Please see the CELTA website for details about the qualification.

Intensive full-time course

  • Starts Monday 17 June 2019 (Please note there will be an induction on Friday 14 June 2019)
  • 5-week course
  • 9:00am – 5:00pm (Monday-Thursday)

Total course fees

Price 2019 : – £1395 (including Cambridge ESOL fee of £156)

Please refer to our Terms and Conditions (PDF)

For further details click here or please contact cewlcelta@kent.ac.uk or telephone 01227 824401

The CELTA course provides great training for anyone strongly considering a career in EFL. The input and teaching practise sessions give useful insights into what will be expected of you. Having CELTA will prove to be a valuable qualification while I am searching for EFL jobs in the UK and abroad. The course tells employers that you are equipped with the skills they are looking for.

Helblind Brock, CELTA Trainee 2016

£250 for Career Development

Work & Opportunities Fund

Are you planning or have you recently secured some unpaid work experience?

Attending a training or networking event which will help you in your future career?

You could be entitled to funding of up to £250!

What can I use the funding for?
This funding will contribute towards the cost of transport, accommodation, training, childcare or uniform.
*Terms and conditions apply.

Am I eligible?
In addition to the Terms and conditions, you must:

  • Be a student registered with the University of Kent, studying in the UK.
  • Be undertaking work which is considered graduate-level or attending a training / networking opportunity that will support your employability upon graduation.
  • Claim the funding against costs incurred in the first 3 weeks (or 120 hours) of your work experience.

Click here for more information and to apply 

POLIR Fully Funded Field Trip – Careers in International Affairs

Career in International Affairs Forum

The School of Politics and International Relations is fully funding a field trip to the annual Careers in International Affairs Forum.

Tickets to the event and a coach trip into London are included.

Places are limited to 10 students, to apply please email: aspirations@kent.ac.uk
and explain why you would like to attend the forum.

Date: 29th April 2019
Time: 9am – 5pm
Venue: City University of London, St John Street London EC1V 4PB

PROGRAMME FOR THE DAY

08:30- 9:00 Registration

09:00- 9:30
Opening Statement – Simon Anholt, Co-Founder, the Good Country

09:30- 10:15
Career in British Foreign Service
– Foreign and Commonwealth Office: Richard Everingham, Lead on the Fast Stream Recruitment

10:15- 11:15
Career in International Organisations
– World Bank: Claire Willman, International Affairs Associate,
– United Nations Population Fund: Matthew Jackson, UK Director

11:15- 11:30 Break

11:30 – 12:15
Career in Think Tanks
– Chatham House: Lisa O’Daly, Director of Human Resources
– Royal United Services Institute: Oliver Kraft, Research Fellow

12:15- 13:15
Leadership Opportunities
– British Council: Bethan Dinning, Project Manager & John Rolfe, Schools Outreach Manager
– Shwarzman Scholars

13:15- 14:15 Lunch Break

14:15- 15:15
Career in Humanitarian Sector
– International Committee of the Red Cross (ICRC): Sophie Da Silva, Recruiter & HR Marketing Officer
– UNICEF: Yahav Lichner, Senior Adviser

15:15-15:45
Career in International Affairs, Private Sector
– Jonathan Paris, Senior Adviser, Chertoff Group
– Richard Griffiths, Senior Advisor, Dentons

15:45 – 16:00 Break

16:00 – 17:00
Career in the United Nations
– United Nations: Eva Jansen, Human Resources Officer

17:00 Closing notes

Click here for more information

 

 

What is your greatest weakness?

Does a job candidate’s answer to this simple interview question predicts success better than their entire resume?

Traci Wilk
“I’d much rather bring somebody into the organization that has taken risks and failed than [somebody who] has always taken the safe route,” says Traci Wilk (pictured).
Courtesy of Traci Wilk
  • Asking interview questions about challenging work experiences can help discern whether a candidate is willing to learn from their mistakes.
  • That’s according to Traci Wilk, senior vice president of people at The Learning Experience and former HR exec at Starbucks.
  • Wilk wants to see evidence of a “growth mindset,” or the belief that talents can be developed through hard work.

One of the hardest parts of a job interview is talking about your flaws and stumbles.

Sometimes the prompt is literally, “what’s your greatest weakness?” Other times it’s, “why were you let go from your last job?”

If you’re interviewing with Traci Wilk, there’s a good chance she’ll encourage you to “tell me about the most challenging work experience that you had and what you learned from it.”

Wilk is the senior vice president of people at The Learning Experience, an early education and childcare franchise. She has also led human resources departments at Starbucks, Coach, and rag & bone. She told Business Insider that, when she asks candidates to share their most challenging work experiences, she’s not exactly trying to suss out their tendency to miss deadlines or talk back to their boss.

Instead, she’s looking for evidence of a “growth mindset.”

Read more: An HR exec who’s worked at Starbucks and Coach was recently asked a surprising question by a job candidate that rocketed them to the top of the list

Wilk said that if the candidate naturally talks about “things that they would have done differently,” that’s a good sign because it shows a “high degree of self-awareness.” She especially wants to see the candidate share some “reflection or a postmortem that they may have done after the situation, how they’ve taken that and applied it into future situations.”

In fact, Wilk added, she’s generally more interested in a candidate’s ability to learn than in their résumé. “Is this someone that’s going to come into the organization certainly with best practices, but also willing to be flexible, willing to be innovative? That’s really the main thing that I’m assessing when I’m meeting with a candidate.”

Read more: An executive coach says practically everyone forgets to ask the job interview question that exposes a big red flag

Other HR leaders say a ‘growth mindset’ is key to success

The term “growth mindset” was coined by psychologist Carol Dweck to describe the belief that your talents can be developed. (The opposite is a “fixed mindset,” which refers to the belief that your talents are innate and can’t change much.) Dweck’s research suggests that people with a growth mindset tend to be more successful.

Microsoft CEO Satya Nadella told Bloomberg that Dweck’s book, “Mindset: The New Psychology of Success,” inspired him to emphasize the importance of a growth mindset among his employees. Microsoft’s chief people officer, Kathleen Hogan, told Geekwire that Microsoft employees weren’t supposed to prove they’re the smartest people in the room, but they were instead supposed to “learn and bring out the best in people.”

As for talking about challenging career experiences in a job interview, if you’re worried about being too candid about your screwups, you probably shouldn’t be.

“It really shows that this person is confident enough to be vulnerable. I’d much rather bring somebody into the organization that has taken risks and failed than [somebody who] has always taken the safe route,” Wilk said.

Build a Powerful CV

Sharpen Your Writing Skills

At the University’s Career Fair, graduate recruiters put communication skills top of the list. Sadly for them, about 20% of graduates’ English skills are not up to scratch for the workplace.

These free practical workshops will help you make your words count. We’ll pin down the function of different kinds of writing. We’ll identify who we’re writing for. We’ll learn about tone, content and structure. We’ll include a scattering of grammar and punctuation so you’ll avoid the worst pitfalls. We’ll examine exactly what will make an employer love your CV. Above all, we’ll write. Bring a pen and paper or a laptop and be ready to try out all kinds of writing.

By the end of this course, you should be able to:
• Understand what writing skills employers look for
• Be ready to write clearly, accurately and effectively in a professional context
• Have a toolkit for approaching any piece of writing, from emailing the CEO to writing a press release
• Be ready to write a persuasive and effective CV.

Course Details:
Dates: Wednesday 14 November & Wednesday 28 November 2018
Time: 13:00-16:00
Location: This will be confirmed once you have booked your place
Cost: FREE

If you have any questions about this workshop, please feel free to contact us at studyplus@kent.ac.uk

Book your place via SDS