Category Archives: Charity Sector

Oxfam Constituency Campaigner Programme

Do you want to create political change?
Together we can change the system!

Oxfam’s Constituency Campaigners are volunteer campaigners who are passionate about ending poverty and want to make their voice heard locally.

As a Constituency Campaigner, you might find yourself persuading your MP to turn up and vote for new legislation that will ensure more refugees can be reunited with their families or meeting with your MP to talk to them about why action on climate change matters to you. You’ll be part of a wider movement of several hundred constituency campaigners who are taking similar action in constituencies up and down the UK. Together, you’ll be making change happen.

Join the programme today
Constituency Campaigners build relationships with and influence their MPs to help end global poverty and suffering. With support from us, you’ll develop a strong knowledge of your MP’s interests and use this to write tailored letters to them and perhaps occasionally to meet with them to discuss issues in-depth.

You’ll be supported by Oxfam through a range of training and guidance. There’s an induction to get you started, regular campaign briefings to help you write tailored letters, and monthly webinars on topics such as “how to influence your MP”. We’ll be in direct contact as much as possible to provide bespoke support, and when people want to, we’ll link you up with others locally to work together.

The programme has a flexible time commitment – you can volunteer as a Constituency Campaigner on as little as just a few hours per month at a time that suits you.

It’s an exciting way for passionate, tenacious people to play a critical role in ending poverty and suffering.

Please apply using our online form.

“This was my first meeting with my brand new MP. Around 20 of us from the constituency met minutes beforehand and huddled together on the pavement asking questions and raising concerns. Despite us being a mixed bunch with different perspectives, we all agreed on the basics. And luckily for me, my MP was supportive of our concerns and more than happy to represent our voices!”
– Ffion, Constituency Campaigner

Innovation Hub

You may have a business, you may have a business idea, you may want to learn how to generate ideas – Hub is a dedicated base for start-up support and incubation at the University of Kent.

To talk to our professional business advisor, please sign up here.

In November we are inviting our external business mentors to come in for a day to run business surgeries.

Want to propel your business in the digital space?
Talk to our Digital Marketing mentor!

November 1st, Thur. Please, book.

Not sure how to evaluate your start-up expenses?
Come to a session with an accountant!
November 13th, Tue. Please, book.

Love the idea of making a change?
Feel like giving back to the community?
Like the idea of running a business?
Social Enterprise Conference
November 1st 2018, Thursday, 12 noon – 4pm, Free admission
A great opportunity to meet like-minded people, network and learn:
– the difference between charity and CIC
– available funding
– local and national success stories
– pitfalls of running a social enterprise
Please, register here.

This year on top of our usual business support activities we are rolling out the #DigitalReboot programme with digital start-up support.

#DigitalReboot APP CHALLENGE

Got an idea for an app?
We can help you digitalise your future!
The Challenge this year is focusing on 17 UN Sustainability Goals.
Teams of 2-4 students are welcome to apply online
Deadline for applications – November 7th.

To increase your chances of successful application we would advise you to book a free confidential 1-2-1 session with a digital business advisor.

Within #DigitalReboot we have just launched Student meet-ups at Mungo’s where students with ideas meet students will skills to create something amazing! Come along to meet entrepreneurial students, find a business partner and socialise.

So many opportunities and so little time!

An option of studying online and acquiring skills on starting your own business is also on MOODLE with Enterprise Skills Award (ESA).

The great news is that by attending all mentioned events (including online module) and taking part in all competitions you will also receive Employability Points!

Be your own boss, learn about starting a business and meet like-minded people!

For further information, please, contact the Hub

T: 01227 824641
E: unikenthub@kent.ac.uk
www.kent.ac.uk/innovation-hub

How to get a job in the 3rd sector

Volunteering is key to breaking into the third sector

Handily for those who’ve already signed up to volunteer, organising and taking part in voluntary events is essential for getting your first charity job. “You need to stand out from the crowd. This means finding time to volunteer with a charity or community-based organisation,” says Ola Fajobi, global head of human resources at Christian Aid.

Likewise, Henrietta Blyth, people director for Tearfund, says volunteering can even outweigh postgraduate qualifications. “Having relevant experience and skills is more valuable than lots of qualifications. Pick a few charities you fancy working for and write to the relevant member of staff to ask them if you can shadow them for a few days. If they say yes, you have an ideal way of building relationships in the sector.”

You don’t need to be in London to work for a charity

While it can sometimes seem like all charity jobs in the UK are based in London, there are plenty of opportunities to be found in the rest of the country. “Although there are less charities outside of London, there are also less candidates, so don’t see this as too much of a barrier,” says Joe Marsh, fundraising consultant for Prospectus.

Though, due to vast size of London, and its direct flight links abroad where charities may have field programmes, there are undoubtedly more opportunities in the capital. “You have to ask yourself whether you would be prepared to move to give yourself more options,” adds Marsh.

When looking for charity jobs, be adaptable

It’s important to be flexible when looking for your first job. You’re unlikely to land your perfect role immediately, and demonstrating flexible skills will help you stand out from the crowd. “There is a lot to be said for candidates who are multi-skilled or have a number of specialities. You can sell yourself as dynamic, adaptable and an asset to any number of departments,” says Glen Manners, charity business manager for TPP recruitment.

Persevere to get your first charity role

The voluntary sector is competitive so part of breaking into an organisation is simply to keep going, says Andrew Hyland, recruitment manager for Macmillan Cancer Support.

Part of what makes candidates successful is showing your passion to recruiters. “The key is to flesh out why you want to work for a charity with examples of why you share an affinity with them. Quote an article, statistic or something from their website – anything to show that you’ve gone above and beyond can help you stand out,” says Manners.

Create your own third-sector job

To land your first charity job or get promoted, one option is to create your own role, says Carla Miller, managing director of Charity People. Look at the gaps that exist within your charity, which are relevant to your skills and offer to fill them. “I have created my own new job that way at a few different charities,” adds Miller. And if you’re looking for promotion, “sit down with your manager and discuss how you need to develop in order to operate at a higher level – then work towards that”.

Make your job applications clear, tailored and concise

How you write your cover letter can make all the difference when applying for jobs in the third sector. “You need to make sure you absolutely address in your letter the main areas that a charity is looking for, and that you do so in a succinct and well-written way,” says Pasca Lane, head of public relations at Scope.

Hyland agrees: “When you apply, ensure your cover letter includes all the skills and personal abilities highlighted in the job description.”

Likewise, it’s important to make sure your CV is concise so it’s easy for recruiters to see your skills. “CVs should be laid out clearly with skills and achievements at the beginning of the document,” says Sandra Smith, senior consultant at Charisma Charity Recruitment. “Voluntary work is important and should be included on CVs as another skillset. This will help prove you have passion and an interest in the charity’s work.”

*this article was published in the Guardian