Tag Archives: creative writing

Lee Ann Brown – Creative Writing Reading Series

Creative Writing Reading Series

 Wednesday 22 March 2017

6.30pm at Reid Hall, in the University of Kent in the Kent Paris  Seminar Room

4 rue de Chevreuse, Montparnasse, Paris 75006

All welcome.

Lee Ann Brown

“To paraphrase Lee Ann’s version of her own poetic genealogy: enthusiasm is the mother (‘We are the daughters of enthusiasm’), excitement the sister (‘Where are my excitement sisters’). Sappho, Emily Dickinson, and Gertrude Stein are among the many innovative godmothers who grace her work with their influential kisses. As a woman writer myself, I am grateful to Lee Ann for the way she unabashedly connects gender to knowledge. In her poems, knowing is knowing as a woman. Knowledge is pleasure. The life of the mind is refreshingly erotic. What was once deemed too trivial here shines.”

– Elaine Equi

Lee Ann Brown was born in Japan and raised in Charlotte, North Carolina. She is the author of several works, including Other Archer, which also appears in French translation by Stéphane Bouquet as Autre Archère, In the Laurels, Caught, which won the 2012 Fence Modern Poets Series Award, and Polyverse, which won the 1996 New American Poetry Competition, selected by Charles Bernstein. In 1989, she founded Tender Buttons Press, which is dedicated to publishing experimental women’s poetry. She currently divides her time between New York City, where she teaches at St. John’s University, and Marshall, North Carolina.

Laurent Binet – Creative Writing Reading Series

Creative Writing Reading Series

Laurent Binet 

Thursday 9 February 2017

6.30pm at Reid Hall, in the Salle de Conférence
4 rue de Chevreuse, Montparnasse, Paris 75006
All welcome.

Award-winner French author Laurent Binet will be reading from and talking about his book ‘The 7th function of language’ (2015), a story about Roland Barthes and the power of language. Binet’s novel starts with Barthes’ death, and assumes the death is an assassination. In the political and intellectual world of the time, everyone is a suspect…

“A brilliantly erudite comedy that recalls Flaubert’s Parrot and The Name of the Rose—with more than a dash of The Da Vinci CodeThe Seventh Function of Language takes us from the cafés of Saint-Germain to the corridors of Cornell University, and into the duels and orgies of the Logos Club, a secret philosophical society that dates to the Roman Empire. Binet has written both a send-up and a wildly exuberant celebration of the French intellectual tradition.” – Macmillan Publishers

Laurent Binet was born in Paris. His first novel, ‘HHhH’, was named one of the fifty best books of 2015 by The New York Times and received the Prix Goncourt du Premier Roman. He is a professor at the University of Paris III, where he lectures on French literature.

Fariba Hachtroudi: Creative Writing Reading Series

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Thursday 26 January 2017

6.30pm at Reid Hall in the Grande Salle. All welcome.

4 rue de Chevreuse, Montparnasse, Paris 75006 (métro: Vavin)

Fariba Hachtroudi

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Fariba Hachtroudi is a French-Iranian novelist, polemicist and political campaigner. Born in 1951, Fariba is the daughter of the prominent dissident Mohsen Hachtroudi and has continued her father’s struggle for freedom of expression and religious tolerance in Iran. She has written extensively on feminism and Islam, including the prize-winning Iran — Rivers of Blood. Her novels are informed by her political thought and personal experience, and explore themes of exile, torture and dissent. She will be speaking about her extraordinary life and her brilliant new novel, The Man Who Snapped His Fingers, in which the dictator of an unnamed Middle-Eastern country goes to horrifying lengths in order to control the population.

Click here to read more about other speakers in our Spring ’17 Creative Writing Reading Series

Spring Term: Creative Reading Writing Series

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Creative Writing Reading Series

Spring Term 2017

All readings are at 6.30pm at Reid Hall

4 rue de Chevreuse, Montparnasse, Paris 75006 (métro: Vavin)

26 January 2017                  Fariba Hachtroudi                 Grande Salle

 

9 February 2017                  Laurent Binet                         Salle de Conférence

 

23 February 2017                David Szalay                          Maison Verte

 

22 March 2017                     Lee Ann Brown                     Salle de Conférence

— free and open to all —

Creative Writing Reading Series – Jon Thompson

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As part of the Autumn Term Creative Writing Reading Series

University of Kent Paris School of Arts and Culture

Proudly presents Jon Thompson reading from his new poetry work Strange Country

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Fascinated by strangeness that’s made in the U.S.A – its beliefs and organization, its affinity for violence and its elusive relationship with the past – Strange Country (Shearsman 2016) lyrically addresses itself to defining American landscapes/dreamscapes, and to their unaccountable beauty.

“In Strange Country Jon Thompson addresses the voices, amongst others, of ‘the traffic of fear’, and bids their speakers join the living…The accomplishment of Strange Country begins with the exact measure of its line and its discovered idiom in the face of what may well be termed the present contradictions of a strange country…Here we find the places of a shared identity where history is disguised, lost, or made into fun for all the family. This is a discovery conveyed in a poetry which not only discloses new meanings for these American places, but also bears the darker episodes of a history usually processed off the screen and page.”Kelvin Corcoran

Jon Thompson is a Professor of English at North Carolina State University where he teaches courses in twentieth-century/contemporary American and British literature. He maintains a particular interest in contemporary poetry and poetics. His current work comes out of his career as a poet, critic and editor. He is the founding editor of the international online journal Free Verse: A Journal of Contemporary Poetry & Poetics, launched in 2001 and also the editor of the single-author poetry series, Free Verse Editions, launched in 2005.

Thursday 17 November 2016

6.30pm at Reid Hall, Grande Salle

4 rue de Chevreuse, Montparnasse, Paris 75006 (Métro: Vavin)

RSVP to paris@kent.ac.uk or to the Facebook Event

Creative Writing Reading Series – David Herd

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As part of the Autumn Term Creative Writing Reading Series

University of Kent Paris School of Arts and Culture

Proudly presents David Herd reading from his new poetry work Through

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A new book of poetry by internationally acclaimed poet David Herd addresses the language that surrounds the reception of people seeking asylum in the UK. Considering the risks that such official hostility poses to human intimacy, Through sets out to register broken affections, to re-explore possibilities of solidarity and trust. Countering the enclosures of public discourse, the poems embrace instead ‘a language in transition’, one in which meaning is multiple, ‘echoing into place a genuine and subsisting relationship’. David Herd is Professor of Modern Literature at the University of Kent and co-organiser of the Refugee Tales project.

What are we going through? How do we get through this? How saturated are we, through and through, with feelings and political sensibilities in interior exile from our time and place? All these questions and more are evoked in David Herd’s subtle and resistantly intelligent work – lyrical and critical at once. Refugees and refusals, refuge and Law, conscience and critique, Agencies and agency, politics and poetics all combine in a pensive work of singular poethical force.” Rachel Blau DuPlessis

Thursday 20 October 2016

6.30pm at Reid Hall, Salle de Conférence

4 rue de Chevreuse, Montparnasse, Paris 75006 (Métro: Vavin)

RSVP to paris@kent.ac.uk or to the Facebook Event