Category Archives: Events

Statement of intent regarding Autumn 2020

The University of Kent is looking forward to welcoming new and returning students in the autumn of 2020. We will, as now, be open for business when the autumn term begins on 21 September 2020

However, we recognise that the COVID-19 pandemic will continue to have an impact on how we all live and work. It is likely that we will have to adapt how we deliver our education, and the wider student experience of university life, in response to changes in government requirements.

We realise what an anxious time this is and want to assure you that planning is already underway to prepare the University for the next academic year. If necessary, we will adapt our teaching styles and delivery methods to ensure that the education and experience of students remains of the highest quality possible and occurs in a safe and effective manner – taking into consideration relevant advice and guidelines that are in place at the time. The safety and wellbeing of our students, staff, visitors and surrounding communities will continue to be our highest priority.

We are committed to ensuring that the standards that led to the University being rated as gold in the Teaching Excellence Framework are upheld, whether that teaching is delivered face-to-face, online or in a blended form of the two with appropriate social distancing in place. Our community of teaching, research and professional services staff will ensure that all education continues to be both a stimulating and fulfilling experience for all our students whether they are at Canterbury, Medway, Brussels or Paris.

We know our campuses are an important part of student life and we look forward to welcoming you all on to campus as soon as it is safe to do so. In the meantime, as we transition back to more usual ways of working, we promise you that, as a member of the University, you will be part of a diverse, dynamic and supportive community and receive an education of the highest possible standard.

This is a repurposed version of a blog post and may differ from the original. View the original blog post.

Kent awarded funding to research the social implications of COVID-19

Kent, in partnership with Belong: The Cohesion and Integration Network, has been funded by the Nuffield Foundation to carry out research into how societal cohesion has been affected by the COVID-19 emergency.

Professor Dominic Abrams and Dr Fanny Lalot of Kent’s Centre for the Study of Group Processes will lead the research, alongside Belong to use data that emerges in real time.

The project will build on existing data focussing on societal cohesion during Brexit. Data will be gathered through surveys of representative samples in Kent, Scotland and Wales, and five local authorities, and combined with qualitative data, including insights from community activists. The research will test how cohesion is made better or worse, how and why individuals become involved or disengaged with groups and communities. This evidence will provide insight into how significant medium term pressures are borne within regions, communities and by individuals.

The findings will provide a rich historical record of what is happening to societal cohesion as the COVID-19 pandemic continues to unfold, and will support policy to build resilience against future short, medium and long term challenges.

The team have been awarded £234,559 to conduct the intensive research that will take place over the next nine months.

Dominic Abrams, Professor of Social Psychology said: ‘We are delighted to have this opportunity to understand what is happening to people’s sense of connection and belonging, their priorities and feelings during this extraordinary time. We hope that this research will break new scientific ground whilst also contributing valuable evidence for policy.’

Alex Beer, Welfare Programme Head at the Nuffield Foundation said: ‘During the massive social upheaval caused by the COVID-19 pandemic we have seen many people and communities organise for the benefit of others, but some disadvantaged groups remain overlooked. This project will inform policy by investigating the impact of the crisis on social cohesion and the factors which shape people’s attitudes and behaviours.’

Jo Broadwood, Chief Executive of Belong: The Cohesion and Integration Network added: ‘We are really pleased to be working with Dominic, his team and the Nuffield Foundation and are excited about the potential for this project to impact on both practice and policy in the future. We think there is much that we can learn from the huge outbreak of kindness and connection in neighbourhoods across the UK and the findings will have relevance for strengthening social bondsresilience and cohesion as we emerge from the crisis.’

This is a repurposed version of a blog post and may differ from the original. View the original blog post.

Applications to scholarship fund open today

Paris Scholarships to the value of £5,000 will be awarded to a limited number of outstanding applicants able to demonstrate a high level of academic achievement, clear intellectual ambition and the potential to make a strong contribution to their chosen MA programme.

Criteria

To be eligible, candidates:

  • Must have received a conditional or unconditional offer of a place on one of the Kent, Paris programmes for the academic year starting in September 2020, whether split-site (Canterbury and Paris) or Paris only.
  • Must start their course in September 2020
  • Intend to study full-time only
  • Can be UK, EU and overseas fee paying students
  • Will be assessed on academic excellence, and will usually hold by July 2020 a first-class Bachelor’s degree in a relevant subject, or hold by July 2020 an equivalent non-UK qualification or a Master’s degree at merit or distinction in a relevant subject or equivalent

For students whose programmes are quoted in euros, your scholarship will automatically be converted into that currency.

How to apply

Candidates must send a letter of motivation, not exceeding 500 words, stating why they wish to join their chosen Kent, Paris MA programme and how this fits into their longer term plans.

The letter of motivation should be saved with the following file name: “FirstnameSURNAME_application number_letter of motivation”, for example: CatherineWOOD_123456789_letter of motivation.doc.

The letter should be addressed to the Academic Director of Paris programmes and sent by email to paris@kent.ac.uk with the subject line: “Scholarship application Firstname SURNAME application number”, for example: Scholarship application Catherine WOOD 123456789.

The opening date for accepting applications is Wednesday 1 April 2020.

Deadline

Friday 15 May 2020, 23:59 BST

Dangerous Ideas Festival and conference: call for papers

The University of Kent Paris School of Arts and Culture‘s annual Paris MA Festival and Conference will take place from 3-7 June 2019 at our centre in Montparnasse and across the city of Paris.

The conference’s keynote speakers are Sarah Churchwell and Lauren Elkin.

Please see the Call for Papers below for more information about how you can get involved in the conference.

Find out more about the festival: www.dangerousideasfest.com. 

February open evening announced in Paris

Admissions and academic members of staff will be present to meet with prospective students and parents on Wednesday, 20 February from 17.00-19.00.

Anyone curious about studying at the University, whether at one of its four postgraduate study centres on the European continent, or in its home county of Kent in the UK are welcome to come along and speak to our admissions representatives. We welcome enquiries for all levels of study: undergraduate, postgraduate, and PhD level.

The open evening will be held at the University’s Paris Centre based at Reid Hall, in the heart of the 6e arrondissement. Light fare will be served.

Guests are invited to book their place here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/paris/contact/visit-us.html.

MA Festival: Revolutions

To mark the 50th anniversary of the May 1968 student protests and general strikes in France, the University of Kent Paris School of Arts and Culture presents the third annual MA Festival and Conference: REVOLUTIONS.

The events of 1968 began in the Latin Quarter of Paris with students protesting an outdated university system and insufficient employment opportunities after graduation. Following a demonstration at the Sorbonne on 3rd May where students were arrested in their hundreds, courses at the university were suspended and students then took their protest to the streets as a result. Barricades were built and the number of student protestors in the city rose to 40,000. Rioting began on 10th May and lead to the arrest and hospitalisation of hundreds. After this day, wildcat general strikes swept the whole country involving several million workers. Authorities feared a radical socialist revolution as the Latin Quarter lay in ruin and industry in France came to a standstill. Violence and strikes continued throughout May and into June of 1968.

Based at Reid Hall in Montparnasse, just a stone’s throw away from the Latin Quarter, the University of Kent finds itself at the heart of the lively left-bank of Paris. Since the 1890s, Reid Hall has been a space for intellectuals and creatives, with an intermission during the First World War where the building was used as a hospital for French and American officers, the building has since returned to its academic roots and today houses universities from America and the United Kingdom.

From 4th – 8th June 2018, students of the Paris School of Arts and Culture will host an interdisciplinary programme of events dedicated to history, film, literature, visual arts and music, to remember not only May 1968 but moments of protest, resistance and innovation throughout history.

We will be highlighting the different events in the upcoming weeks and you can discover the entire festival programme here.

Follow the festival news on Twitter and Facebook.

David Hockney: transatlantic artist

Politics of Translation: Translation of Cultures

David Hockney: transatlantic artist

Presented by Martin Hammer,

Professor of History and Philosophy of Art at the University of Kent.

 

 

With the major Hockney show coinciding with his 80th birthday about to arrive at the Pompidou, having attracted huge visitor numbers in London, this is a good moment to offer fresh thinking about what made his early art so distinctive, but also what concerns and attitudes he may have shared with his 1960s contemporaries. This talk will focus in particular on a comparative discussion of the work of Hockney and Ed Ruscha, born within a few months of one another, friends and fellow Los Angeles residents, who have both tended to be categorised as Pop Artists, and now number amongst the most famous painters on the planet. What, then, can we learn about well-known Hockneys such as Tea Painting in an Illusionistic Style (1961) and A Bigger Splash (1967) from juxtaposing them with Ruscha’s current production as painter and maker of photobooks?

 Tuesday 23 May 2017

6:30 pm at Reid Hall in the Grande Salle

4 rue de Chevreuse, Montparnasse, Paris 75006

All welcome.

Lee Ann Brown – Creative Writing Reading Series

Creative Writing Reading Series

 Wednesday 22 March 2017

6.30pm at Reid Hall, in the University of Kent in the Kent Paris  Seminar Room

4 rue de Chevreuse, Montparnasse, Paris 75006

All welcome.

Lee Ann Brown

“To paraphrase Lee Ann’s version of her own poetic genealogy: enthusiasm is the mother (‘We are the daughters of enthusiasm’), excitement the sister (‘Where are my excitement sisters’). Sappho, Emily Dickinson, and Gertrude Stein are among the many innovative godmothers who grace her work with their influential kisses. As a woman writer myself, I am grateful to Lee Ann for the way she unabashedly connects gender to knowledge. In her poems, knowing is knowing as a woman. Knowledge is pleasure. The life of the mind is refreshingly erotic. What was once deemed too trivial here shines.”

– Elaine Equi

Lee Ann Brown was born in Japan and raised in Charlotte, North Carolina. She is the author of several works, including Other Archer, which also appears in French translation by Stéphane Bouquet as Autre Archère, In the Laurels, Caught, which won the 2012 Fence Modern Poets Series Award, and Polyverse, which won the 1996 New American Poetry Competition, selected by Charles Bernstein. In 1989, she founded Tender Buttons Press, which is dedicated to publishing experimental women’s poetry. She currently divides her time between New York City, where she teaches at St. John’s University, and Marshall, North Carolina.

Abdulrazak Gurnah: Rendered into English

Politics of Translation: Translating Cultures

Thursday 30 March 2017

7:00 pm at Reid Hall, in the University of Kent in the Grande Salle

4 rue de Chevreuse, Montparnasse, Paris 75006

All welcome.

Abdulrazak Gurnah: Rendered into English

A reflection on the implications of ‘rendering’ into English concepts and beliefs which derive from another culture and language, from the perspective of writing fiction and the issues that arise in this process.

Abdulrazak Gurnah was born in Zanzibar and is now best-known as a novelist. His fourth novel Paradise was short-listed for the Booker Prize in 1994. His latest novel is The Last Gift (2011). His main academic interest is in postcolonial writing and in discourses associated with colonialism, especially as they relate to Africa, the Caribbean and India. He has edited two volumes of Essays on African Writing, has published articles on a number of contemporary postcolonial writers, including Naipaul, Rushdie and Zoe Wicomb. He is the editor of A Companion to Salman Rushdie (Cambridge University Press 2007).

Laurent Binet – Creative Writing Reading Series

Creative Writing Reading Series

Laurent Binet 

Thursday 9 February 2017

6.30pm at Reid Hall, in the Salle de Conférence
4 rue de Chevreuse, Montparnasse, Paris 75006
All welcome.

Award-winner French author Laurent Binet will be reading from and talking about his book ‘The 7th function of language’ (2015), a story about Roland Barthes and the power of language. Binet’s novel starts with Barthes’ death, and assumes the death is an assassination. In the political and intellectual world of the time, everyone is a suspect…

“A brilliantly erudite comedy that recalls Flaubert’s Parrot and The Name of the Rose—with more than a dash of The Da Vinci CodeThe Seventh Function of Language takes us from the cafés of Saint-Germain to the corridors of Cornell University, and into the duels and orgies of the Logos Club, a secret philosophical society that dates to the Roman Empire. Binet has written both a send-up and a wildly exuberant celebration of the French intellectual tradition.” – Macmillan Publishers

Laurent Binet was born in Paris. His first novel, ‘HHhH’, was named one of the fifty best books of 2015 by The New York Times and received the Prix Goncourt du Premier Roman. He is a professor at the University of Paris III, where he lectures on French literature.