Dr Peter Buš presents paper at eCAADe 2020

Dr Peter Buš, Lecturer in Digital Architecture presents his paper titled, ‘User-driven Configurable Architectural Assemblies: Towards artificial intelligence-embedded responsive environments‘ at the Education and Research in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe (eCAADe) conference taking place on the 16th and 17th September.

The paper theoretically elaborates the idea of individual users’ customisation activities to create and configure responsive spatial scenarios by means of reconfigurable interactive adaptive assemblies. It reflects Gordon Pask’s concept of human and device interaction based on its unpredictable notion speculating a potential to be enhanced by artificial intelligence learning approach of an assembly linked with human activator’s participative inputs. Such a link of artificial intelligence, human agency and interactive assembly capable to generate its own spatial configurations by itself and users’ stimuli may lead to a new understanding of humans’ role in the creation of spatial scenarios. The occupants take the prime role in the evolution of spatial conditions in this respect.

The paper aims to position an interaction between the human agents and artificial devices as a participatory and responsive design act to facilitate creative potential of participants as unique individuals without pre-specified or pre-programmed goal set by the designer. Such an approach will pave a way towards true autonomy of responsive built environments, determined by an individual human agent and behaviour of the spatial assemblies to create authentic responsive built forms in a digital and physical space.

Dr Peter Buš publishes new article, ‘On-Site Participation for Proto-Architectural Assemblies’

Lecturer and member of Digital Architecture Research Centre (DARC), Dr Peter Buš, has recently written an article titled, ‘On-site participation for proto-architectural assemblies encompassing technology and human improvisation: “Fish Trap” and “Orchid” architectural interventions‘ which has been published in the special issue of Complexity. Complexity is a journal specialising in reporting ‘advances in the scientific study of complex systems’. Dr Buš’ article features in their special issue titled, ‘Tales of Two Societies: On the complexity of the coevolution between physical space and the cyber space’.

Dr Peter Buš writes, “This research investigates the notion of builders’ on-site engagement to physically build architectural interventions based on their demands, spatial requirements, and collaborative improvisation enhanced with the principles of uniqueness and bespoke solutions which are previously explored in computational models.

The paper compares and discusses two physical installations as proto-architectural assemblies testing two different designs and building approaches: the top-down predefined designers’ scenario contrary to bottom-up unpredictable improvisation. It encompasses a building strategy based on the discrete precut components assembled by builders themselves in situ.

The paper evaluates both strategies in a qualitative observation and comparison defining advantages and limitations of the top-down design strategy in comparison with the decentralised bottom-up building system built by the builders themselves. As such, it outlines the position of a designer within the bottom-up building processes on-site. The paper argues that improvisation and builders’ direct engagement on-site lead to solutions that better reflect human needs and low-tech building principles incorporated can deliver unpredictable but convenient spatial scenarios.”

Dr Peter Buš delivers public lecture and workshop at National United University in Taiwan

Dr Peter Buš, member of DARC Research Centre, was invited by Assistant Professor Shi-Yen Wu from the Department of Architecture at the National United University (NUU) in Taiwan to give a public lecture and a computational design workshop based on his previous collaborative activities with the NUU.

Dr Peter Buš’ lecture, ‘Transforming architecture in the age of digitisation of construction: participation, automation and evolving responsive concepts for the 21st Century’, conceptually outlined the idea of crowd-driven assemblies for flexible and adaptive constructions utilising automatic technologies in the context of twenty-first century cities.

The workshop, ‘Emergent proto-architectural formations: towards bio-integrated responsive architectural design, computational design workshop’ was attended by 60 students from National United University in Miao-Li and 13 students from the Shadong Jianzhu University in China. The workshop explored potentials and advantages of advanced computational design methods to rapidly generate spatial digital artefacts, ‘proto-architectures’, based on systematic and process-driven modelling techniques integrating the paradigm of emergence into computational models.

Dr Peter Buš to give lecture at National United University in Miao-Li

Dr Peter Buš, Lecturer in Digital Architecture and member of DARC Research Centre, will be visiting Taiwan later this month to give a lecture at the National United University in Miao-Li. His lecture titled, ‘Transforming architecture in the age of digitisation of construction: participation, automation and evolving responsive concepts for the 21st Century’, conceptually outlines the idea of crowd-driven assemblies for flexible and adaptive constructions utilising automatic technologies in the context of twenty-first century cities.

The presentation will also look at the results from Peter’s Richard Rogers Fellowship residency in London conducted last Spring dedicated to large-scale urban prototyping for responsive cities. Peter argues that building technology needs to incorporate human inputs following the aspects of customisation to build adaptive architectural and urban scenarios based on immediate decisions made according to local conditions or specific spatial demands. The presentation will focus on large-scale automatic prototyping for built applications at the theoretical level along with interactions between humans and automatic building technologies.

Sir Terry Farrell introduces masterclass at Kent School of Architecture and Planning

Sir Terry Farrell personally introduced a masterclass session at Kent School of Architecture and Planning (KSAP) on Friday 25th October with a talk about his urban design projects. His audience included students from all levels at the School, plus a group of 35 4th and 5th year visiting students from ENSAP (Ecole nationale supérieure d’architecture et de paysage de Lille), led by Gilles Maury and his colleagues. Gilles Maury and the school are old friends and partners of KSAP, and their arrival followed a tour around the South East which included visits to Philip Webb’s Red House and Standen, the University of Sussex and the Ditchling Museum of Arts + Craft. The event was planned by KSAP tutors John Letherland and Dr Ambrose Gillick, with the participation of Dr Tim Ireland and Dr Peter Buš.

Sir Terry followed the design session with a lecture at the University organised by the Canterbury Society. His theme was the way in which his own design career had evolved from his earliest landscape paintings of the Northumberland countryside, through his major London projects, his Thames Gateway plan and championing of Kentish towns, to his current large-scale work in China. Sir Terry was introduced to the audience by Dr Timothy Brittain-Catlin who played a central role in the Twentieth Century Society’s campaign to protect postmodern buildings in England.

 

Dr Peter Buš to speak at the Automation and Robotics Show

Dr Peter Buš will be speaking at the Automation and Robotics Show in Milton Keynes Arena on 25th June. His talk titled, ‘Large-scale prototyping utilising technologies and participation’ will envisage large-scale cable-driven systems for urban automation and takes the inspiration of processes-driven approach for construction from the shipping port areas in waterfront cities.

There is an immense potential in a combination of off-site and on-site construction approaches, with process-driven off-site systems expanding their ‘essence’ towards on-site deployment, potentially leading to increased construction efficiency and productivity. In addition, there is a growth in customised solutions for the construction sector as well as container-based modular construction systems where non-traditional building methods will benefit from these with the support of digital technologies. In particular, the presentation theoretically focuses on large-scale automatic prototyping for build applications along with interactions between humans and automatic building technologies to create on-demand spatial scenarios supported by relevant computational design methods for scenarios generation.

Kent School of Architecture and Planning launch new Digital Architecture Research Centre

Kent School of Architecture and Planning (KSAP) are pleased to announce the launch of DARC (Digital Architecture Research Centre).

DARC is the newest research centre at Kent School of Architecture and Planning (KSAP) specialising in the application of digital technology in architecture. DARC will focus on the creative use of digital technologies to enhance design and fabrication possibilities for architecture and the built environment. The Centre has streams headed by its members:

  • Generative design and computational creativity
  • Digital fabrication and robotics
  • Digital visualisation and mixed reality.

The Centre is a new interdisciplinary direction for KSAP, founded on members’ expertise and international research profiles, it aims to promote an innovative interdisciplinary research environment exploring intersections between architecture and digital technologies.

If you’d like to find out more about DARC, and about the latest addition to KSAP’s postgraduate offering, MSc Bio Digital Architecture, email ksaadmissions@kent.ac.uk to join the free Google Hangout with Dr Tim Ireland, Director of Digital Architecture, on Wednesday 5 June at 14.00 BST.

Dr Peter Buš to present at eCAADe SIGraDi 2019

Dr Peter Buš will be presenting his recent paper titled, ‘Large-scale prototyping utilising technologies and participation: On-demand and crowd-driven urban scenarios’ at the next eCAADe SIGraDi 2019 taking place in Porto with the theme of ‘Architecture in the age of the 4th industrial revolution’.

Dr Buš’ paper theorises and elaborates the idea of crowd-driven assemblies for flexible and adaptive constructions utilising automatic technologies and participatory activities within the context of 21st century cities. As economic and technological movements and shifts in society and cultures are present and ongoing, the building technology needs to incorporate human inputs following the aspects of customisation to build adaptive architectural and urban scenarios based on immediate decisions made according to local conditions or specific spatial demands. In particular, the paper focuses on large-scale prototyping for urban applications along with on-site interactions between humans and automatic building technologies to create on-demand spatial scenarios.

It discusses the current precedents in research and practice and speculates future directions to be taken in creation, development or customisation of contemporary and future cities based on participatory and crowd-driven building activities. As such, the main aim of this theoretical overview is to offer a more comprehensive understanding of the relations between technology and humans in the context of reactive and responsive built environments.