Former PhD student, Itab Shuayb creates campaign for inclusive communities during Covid-19

Former Kent School of Architecture and Planning PhD student, Itab Shuayb, creates inclusive campaign with cohort of architecture students at the American University of Beirut as part of their final project in her Inclusive Design course, with the collaboration of the Disability Hub at the Centre for Lebanese Studies, LAU, in Lebanon.

 

Itab writes, “Inclusive design is a human-centered approach that acknowledges the rights of all people regardless of age, gender, ability, religion, and ethnicity to participate and contribute to their society. This campaign sheds light on the main issues and barriers that diverse people have encountered during the crisis of Covid-19. Five videos have been designed inclusively with subtitles in in English Language, audio description, and graphic animations that convey the slogan, If the Corona Pandemic does not exclude anyone, so why does social justice not include us all.”

Watch the campaign videos over on the Centre for Lebanese Studies YouTube channel.

PhD Student Anske Bax takes part in Online Reading Marathon

GIANCARLO DE CARLO AT 100 – Online Reading Marathon participation with Kent University and the Kent School of Architecture & Planning.  

By Anske Bax

What is it?

A public marathon of reading and visiting the works of Italian architect Giancarlo De Carlo. Promoted on social media through Instagram among the initiatives by the Committee for the Centennial of Giancarlo De Carlo. The reading marathon organised by Professor Antonello Alici of the University of Politecnica delle Marche, is entrusted to students and housed in De Carlo’s places and architectures in Italy and abroad. The two-years long programme promotes a research network of schools and institutions; inviting master and doctoral students to participate in a marathon of re-reading and re-visiting the writings and projects by Giancarlo De Carlo. The four-minute readings seek to encourage research seminars and symposia. Kent School of Architecture was one of the international institutions to have participated in the readings on the 2nd May 2020.

Who was Giancarlo de Carlo?

Giancarlo De Carlo (12 December 1919 − 4 June 2005) is a major figure in the architectural debate and practice of the 20th century for his capacity of reading contexts and exploring the tensions of the city. He built his first theoretical steps on William Morris and Patrick Geddes and revived the legacy of Giuseppe Pagano and Edoardo Persico. In 1993 he was awarded the RIBA Gold Medal, following the suggestion of Colin St John Wilson, who praised him as ‘the Master of Resistance’ and  ‘the most lucid of his generation of architect-philosophers-in-action’ – for his tireless critical action within the Modern Movement.

University of Kent’s involvement and perspective

International collaboration and wider project participation are very much the norm at the Kent School of Architecture and Planning. A mindset that I noticed almost immediately upon joining the school as a doctoral student. These proud collaborations including the marathon reading for Giancarlo De Carlo harness a wider academic unity and through peer involvement encourages one to open one’s mind in architectural theory. These projects are thanks to the wonderful staff of our department, including my experience made possible by the kind efforts of Dr Manolo Guerci and fellow PhD colleague, Benedetta Castagna.  It was a true honour to be asked to read an extract (Reading 7.1) by Giancarlo De Carlo about the work of Le Corbusier. The Swiss born architect who De Carlo identified as someone who was able to create a defined architectural language, but at some point, it lost connection with the reality of the contexts. A clear statement of De Carlo’s conception about the Modern Movement. My reading is one of many enlightening texts on the Instagram page. I would encourage anyone to participate in this two-year project by emailing myself or Benedetta Castagna.

 

Former KSAP PhD student, Itab Shuayb, publishes new book

A big congratulations to former KSAP PhD student, Dr Itab Shuayb, who has published her new book titled, ‘Inclusive University Built Environments: The Impact of Approved Document M, for Architects, Designers and Engineers‘.

Dr Shuayb’s book focuses on an area of her PhD research which was to investigate whether universities adopting the British Accessibility regulations have impacted the built environment to the level that it became inclusive or whether the built environment is accessible for only people with mobility impairment. Dr Shuayb’s PhD research was done in collaboration with the Commission for Architecture and the Built Environment (CABE) their specialists for inclusive design. CABE’s inclusive design work has since been incorporated into the Design Council agenda. Professor Gordana Fontana-Giusti was Itab’s first supervisor, with her second supervisor being Ann Sawyer, an access consultant based in London.

Dr Shuayb writes, “This book focuses on examining accessibility in the educational sector in the UK to investigate whether adopting an inclusive design approach in a university setting is preferable to just meeting legal building requirements. Six building case studies at the University of Kent were selected in order to investigate whether the design solutions had addressed the needs of a wide range of users. Moreover, the book investigates the impact of the legislation and Building Regulations on  six different university buildings dating from six different decades, the 1960s, 1970s, 1980s, 1990s, 2000s and 2010s, at the Universities of Essex, Bath and Kent to determine whether they have achieved inclusive design .The book then sets out a proposal to deliver the benefits of adopting the inclusive design approach by recommending alternative design solutions to tackle accessibility barriers that affect a wide range of users, including individuals with disabilities at the University of Kent.”

 

PhD students to present at SAHGB Architectural History Workshop

Two Kent School of Architecture and Planning’s PhD students, Ben Tosland and Rafaella Siagkri are due to present at The Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain’s Architectural History Workshop 2020. This year’s workshop is due to take place at a postponed date, and will take place at The Galley in London. The theme of this year’s workshop is, ‘Beyond the Academy: Architectural History in Heritage, Conservation and Curating’.

Ben Tosland will be presenting with his talk titled, ‘Methodological reflection: problems researching 20th century architecture in the Persian Gulf’. Ben’s doctoral thesis thesis faced numerous methodological challenges which this presentation will discuss, sharing the problems – in some cases unsolved – with researching a region in constant political and economic flux, characterised by cultural, political and economic contrasts. He will discuss the issues surrounding what study material to choose, or which buildings might be necessary, explaining the case studies and architects I chose for my thesis (focusing on Max Lock, Candilis-Josic-Woods, Alfred Roth, Doxiadis Associates and Jørn Utzon), describing their position in the Gulf’s contribution to a picture of a global modernism.

Rafaella Siagkri will be presenting, ‘Virtual Reality as an investigative tool to better understand architecture in historical films’. Her presentation will assess the significance of Virtual Reality (VR) as a reconstruction method. Using 3Ds Max Software to model film sets from the film The Cabinet of Dr Caligari and using Unreal Software to transfer to Oculus Rift technology will allow the generation of VR simulations to be used in this study. This provides the capability to recreate old, iconic expressionist film sets and to better understand its space.

Two further scholarships available for Architecture PhD applicants

Kent School of Architecture and Planning are pleased to announce two further scholarships for our Architecture PhD applicants:

Engineering and Physical Sciences Research Council (EPSRC) Scholarship

  • Fee waiver at Home/EU rate
  • Maintenance stipend of £15,009 per year (2019/20 rate)
  • Open to Home/EU applicants but there might be an opportunity for an excellent overseas applicant
  • Deadline: 27 March 2020

The deadline for PhD Architecture applicants has been extended to 27 March.

The second scholarship is the Kent-Lille Joint (Cotutelle) PhD Scholarships

  • Fees and Stipend at the standard Research Council rate (Home/EU rate only, £15,009 in 2019/20)
  • Funding 4 PhD scholarships (2 in the field of Humanities, 1 in Social Sciences and 1 in Sciences)
  • Jointly supervised PhDs
  • Criteria: 1) Scholarships are available on a cotutelle (dual award) basis only 2) Students have to spend at least 12 months at Kent and Lille 3) Before applying students are required to identify an academic supervisor from Kent and Lille.
  • How to apply: contact the relevant academic school as early as possible and identify a supervisor at Kent and discuss your cotutelle plans with them. Applicants will need to complete a ‘Cotutelle Statement’ which explains why a cotutelle arrangement is necessary for their project (150 words).
  • Deadline: PhD offer in place by Friday 17 April 2020

If you have any queries about applying for Architecture PhD, feel free to email ksapadmissions@kent.ac.uk.