Sciencecomma

Author's details

Date registered: June 21, 2012

Latest posts

  1. ‘Visualising dynamic theories, what diagrams of molecular pathways represent’ by Filippo Guizzetti — July 1, 2016
  2. ‘Describing Albrecht Dürer’s Philosophy and Practice of Drawing and to What Extent His Drawings Reflect the Way Nature was Perceived at the Time’ by Larissa Warneck — April 6, 2016
  3. From Course to Collider: My adventures at CERN — February 17, 2016
  4. Blister Cinema — February 10, 2015
  5. HG Wells Annual Lecture on WWI science and suffrage — February 6, 2015

Most commented posts

  1. HG Wells Annual Lecture on WWI science and suffrage — 2 comments
  2. From Course to Collider: My adventures at CERN — 1 comment
  3. Blister Cinema — 1 comment

Author's posts listings

Jul 01

‘Visualising dynamic theories, what diagrams of molecular pathways represent’ by Filippo Guizzetti

Figure 1. Schematic representation of an animal cell. Encyclopaedia Britannica, 2010. kids.britannica.com

Visualisation is a constitutive and essential part of the scientific activity. From basic research to the production of evidences (Amann and Knorr Cetina 1988), from the development of scientific theories to the stage of public evaluation, several methods of representation are the root from which the scientific discourse unfolds (Pauwels 2006, p.vii; Lynch 1988, p.153). …

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Apr 06

‘Describing Albrecht Dürer’s Philosophy and Practice of Drawing and to What Extent His Drawings Reflect the Way Nature was Perceived at the Time’ by Larissa Warneck

Introduction Albrecht Dürer was one of the leading artists of the Renaissance. His innovative ideas in geometry and the proportion of the human body, his realistic representation of nature, and his imagination in probing new printing techniques, lead to his reputation as the Leonardo Da Vinci of Northern Europe. In this essay I am going …

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Feb 17

From Course to Collider: My adventures at CERN

by David Lugmayer Science can be complex. Even with a lifetime spent studying the sciences one could still not learn everything it has to offer. Yet much of this knowledge can be very important to our lives, whoever we are and whatever occupation we have: This is why we need science communication and is one …

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Feb 10

Blister Cinema

A poster for Genetic Moo's 'Blister Cinema' at GEEK

An opportunity to discuss an exciting art and science project with Margate-based artists Genetic Moo Genetic Moo are currently working on an Animate Project commission Silent Signal which is supported by the Wellcome Trust. Silent Signal comprises 6 art-science collaborations which explore how the body uses soundless internal dialogues between cells to fight disease. In …

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Feb 06

HG Wells Annual Lecture on WWI science and suffrage

H.G. Wells in 1910

The Centre for the History of the Sciences will welcome Dr Pratricia Fara of the University of Cambridge to deliver the fourth annual HG Wells Lecture. Dr Fara’s lecture will take place on Wednesday 4 March at 17.15 in Keynes Lecture Theatre 5 on the University of Kent’s Canterbury campus and will be followed by …

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Feb 04

Werewolf Transformations, Ghostly Apparitions, the Dance of Death and the Man who eats Rats

Jeremy Brooker

Join us for a cold, dark evening treat, which takes the audience back to the time of the magic lanternist for an evening of visual spectacle and darkly chilling horrors. Featuring Jeremy Brooker and his Grand Gothic Magic Lantern Show, the event will include werewolf transformations, ghostly apparitions, the Dance of Death and the Man …

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Oct 31

Infection

This blog post is one of an on-going series arising from the AHRC-funded project Metamorphoses: Gaming Art and Science with Ovid. The project pairs up an artist (Sarah Craske, research fellow at the Centre for the History of the Sciences, University of Kent) and a scientist (Simon Park, Department of Microbial and Cellular Sciences, University …

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Jul 15

Charles Fort, WWI and Science

Or the uses of witchcraft in warfare — But that, without the sanction of hypocrisy, superintendence by hypocrisy, the blessing by hypocrisy, nothing ever does come about — Or military demonstrations of the overwhelming effects of trained hates — scientific uses of destructive bolts of a million hate-power — the blasting of enemies by disciplined …

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Jun 12

Mind Maps: Stories from Psychology

‘Mind Maps: Stories from Psychology explores how mental health conditions have been diagnosed and treated over the past 250 years. Divided into four episodes between 1780 and 2014, this exhibition looks at key breakthroughs in scientists’ understanding of the mind and the tools and methods of treatment that have been developed, from Mesmerism to Electroconvulsive …

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May 20

CHOTS Away Day: The Historic Dockyard, Chatham, 9 May 2014

Members of the University of Kent's Centre for the History of the Sciences meet outside The Royal Historic Dockyard, Chatham, Kent.

It was in the mid-sixteenth century when the Royal Navy first used the riparian areas surrounding the River Medway for the construction, repair and storage of its ships, with the first warship, the Sunne, launched in 1586. From that time until now the dockyard on the Chatham shore has been in near-constant use building ships …

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