Category Archives: fine art

Visiting Artists Talk – Tom Woolner

The School of Music and Fine Art are delighted to welcome artist Tom Woolner this coming Thursday, in the next of our series of Visiting Artists Talks.

28th November, 6-8pm
Chatham Historic Dockyard
BridgeWardens College, Lecture Theatre

Tom Woolner is an artist based in London, working predominately in sculpture and performance. His cartoon-dumb installations are often made on-site for particular spaces, while the makeshift and often shambolic performances borrow freely from genres of both theatre and comedy.

In 2014 he will be making a new commission for the Olympic Park, London and a new performance at Modern Art, Oxford and Spike Island, Bristol.

Tom Woolner’s recent exhibitions include:
FOLD, London
Site Gallery, Sheffield
Gallery Jecza, Romania 

Tom has also made performances at the Barbican; ANDOR, London and V22, London. We are delighted to welcome Tom to the next Artist Talk event this week.

Tom Woolner

 

 

 

 

 

View Events Calendar

Tate Modern commissioned Sonic Trail ‘From Surface to Surface’ launches this month

New Tate Modern commissioned work launches this month.

Duncan Macleod Surface to Surface
The School of Music and Fine Art would like to congratulate music lecturer, Duncan Macleod on his work responding to the artwork ‘From Surface to Surface’ by Susumu Koshimizu.

‘The Sonic Trail; From Surface to Surface’ commissioned by Tate, was launched this month as part of Tate Modern’s Sonic Trails collection. This represents an exciting contribution to the School’s research culture and is now available to listen to online.

The electronic work, written for headphones, features 14 miniature audio tracks which correspond to individual pieces of the artwork.

Gallery visitors can either download or stream and listen to the work on an mp3 player – visit https://soundcloud.com/sonictrails/  or, on some listening devices that can be signed-out from the Tate Modern Clore Centre. There will also be some activities for younger audiences.

View more on the Tate website

School of Music and Fine Art’s Barbara Morris Teaching Prize Success

Barbara Morris Prize benefits students in ‘Skills Enhancement Week’ – Learning Support 2013.

2013 Barbara Morris winners

 

 

 

 

 
Congratulations go to Dr Paul Fretwell, Director of Learning and Teaching and Employability and Events Coordinator, Ann Howe, the School’s  joint winners of the Barbara Morris Prize for Learning Support 2013, along with the Student Support Team at the School of Arts at Canterbury, for their dedication and input into the ‘Skills Enhancement Week’ in February, 2013.

Thirteen Kent academics were recognised for their teaching excellence at a ceremony at the University’s Canterbury campus on 3 October presented by Professor Dame Julia Goodfellow, University Vice-Chancellor. ‘Teaching excellence is vitally important for all students. These annual awards recognise this. I congratulate all those who have received awards this year. The projects are first rate.’

The School of Music and Fine Art’s Skills Enhancement Week took place between Monday 18th and Friday 22nd February, which replaced ‘Reading Week’, provided an invigorated forum and a focussed few days of informative and inspirational events for students to be able to enhance their skills leading to improved employability. Students were able to earn University ‘Employability Points’ by attending these events and prizes were on offer to the student who attended the most sessions and the event went on to lead to a number of student placements and internships with organisations such as Microsoft Computer Games, Zealous, Earcom Ltd and other work experience opportunities.

The team were dedicated to securing an array of industry-recognised guest speakers who provided lively talks, along with a week’s schedule of mixed study skills and employability-related workshops.  Activities such as workshops on self-employment, entrepreneurship, developing partnerships and networking spanned the five days and there were personal and professional development workshops too, where students could learn about how to build and develop their online presence and how to ‘market’ themselves, hone their CV writing skills and learn about the Year Abroad possibilities.

The judging panel were impressed with the team’s employment-focussed student support, as the Skills Enhancement Week clearly enriched the student’s experiences and provided a model which could be emulated across other the other Schools. It was also deemed an excellent example of external engagement, benefiting both students and the University through collaboration.

‘The week proved to be a great success and was even opened up to other University students to attend’ said prize winner Ann Howe. ‘It provided a great opportunity for career networking for students with external industry employers and gave students a chance to think holistically about their education, develop an awareness of skills needed for future employment and to actively build their own employability’

For full details on all the 2013 University of Kent Teaching Prize Award winners and see for more images: http://www.kent.ac.uk/teaching/news.html?view=568

 

Image caption:
Winners of the Barbara Morris Prize for Learning Support 2013 (SMFA’s  Paul Fretwell 2nd right, Ann Howe 3rd right)

Sound Art Workshop at Tate Britain

Series of workshops ‘From Landscape to Soundscape’ 

claudia_molitor_Landscape to Soundscape

School of Music and Fine Art lecturer and composer, Dr Claudia Molitor, is leading a series of workshops at the Tate Britain, Manton Studio entitled ‘From Landscape to Soundscape’ throughout November, exploring contemporary thinking around looking, listening and interpreting sound.

Workshop participants learn a variety of techniques for collecting and recording sound and use these to explore the view across the river from the historic site of Tate Britain. With professional singing tutor Natalie Raybould participants learn how to vocalise these sounds to others and contribute to the creation of a new sound piece:  A Sonic View that translates what can be seen from Tate Britain into a unique soundscape.

This course is for people with an interest in sound art, music and performance though no prior experience is necessary. Singing ability is not required, only an openness to using your voice and working collaboratively to develop and perform a new sound piece. Workshop participants will take away new listening and vocal skills, and a recording of A Sonic View performance.

For more information, view the Tate Britain courses and workshops page.

From Landscape to Soundscape
Tate Britain, Manton Studio


2–3 November
16–17 November
23 November

14.00–18.00

Read more or book a place.

Two Students Selected for Turner Contemporary Platform Graduate Showcase and Award

Turner Contemporary_logo_exhibitions  Turner Contemporary

Charlotte Smith and Daniella Turbin are selected to exhibit for 2013

We were delighted that so many of our students here at the School of Music and Fine Art were shortlisted for the Turner Contemporary Platform Graduate Exhibition show this year, opening 9th October at the Turner Contemporary gallery in Margate.

Last year we were pleased to have one student selected for the show, but for 2013 we have two students going forward. Charlotte Smith and Daniella Turbin have been selected alongside 5 other students from the University for the Creative Arts and Canterbury Christchurch University.

The exhibition showcases the talent of emerging artists from East Kent The Turner’s Clore Learning Studio and other spaces, as part of their Platform programme which aims to support graduate professional development and nurture new talent.  

Charlotte’s work is a contemporary installation called Ephemeral Rays and consists of hundreds of light bulbs, dust and fishing line. It seeks to reflect the way in which light rests within a space, settling like dust even if just momentarily. Adapted for the Turner specifically, the installation evolves into a new form drawing on the stunning expanse of sea and sky, with the infinite horizon line as the focal point of the composition.

Daniella’s work focuses on visually documenting dream images in her work. Her practice is rooted in debates about drawing within contemporary art and includes three dimensional interpretations.

Tim Meacham, Lecturer in Fine Art at the School of MFA said: ‘We are very proud and pleased for Charlotte and Daniella; their work looks wonderful in the gallery spaces. Both have conducted themselves with maturity and professionalism throughout the selection and installation process. ‘Platform is a great opportunity for them, launching their careers as independent practitioners through exhibiting their work in a major contemporary art gallery.’

Platform Programme is a project whereby students work with the Turner Contemporary throughout their final year and through a combination of visits, tutorials and presentations, curators and other Turner staff track the students’ progress and practice development throughout their 3rd year. This culminates in some of their degree work being chosen to exhibit at the Platform Exhibition and get put forward for the Platform Graduate Award, winner to be announced in November.

We are thrilled to be showing the work of recent graduates. Platform is part of our wider remit to showcase creativity of artists working today.’
Victoria Pomery, Director, Turner Contemporary.

The Platform Graduate Showcase is taking place 9th October – 10th November 2013 at the Turner Contemporary in Margate.  
We would encourage anyone interested to visit the exhibition, which is free to attend.

For more information visit the Turner Contemporary website.

Fine Art PhD Student Premiers at London Film Festival 2013

Research Student_film festival_zabriskie-point-001

Firstly, we would like to welcome Stephen Connolly, a new Fine Art PhD Research student to Kent at the School of Music and Fine Art. Stephen brings a wealth of talent and ambition to the School and we are delighted to announce Stephen’s latest film is about to premier at the 57th London Film Festival. There is an opportunity to attend the screenings in October at the London Film Festival Experimenta strand.
Artist filmmaker Stephen Connolly’s work investigates cinema and representation through place, politics and history, he explores relationships between the subject and institutions through landscape and the notion of the ‘ensemble’ in moving image.  A Central Saint Martins Fine Art (film/video) graduate, his single screen work has been widely shown internationally since 2002. He is starting a PhD in Fine Art as a Kent 50 Scholar.

I wanted to ‘play the stranger’ with the original film. I’ve put the story to one side and concentrated on other aspects of the movie – the landscapes, the documentary footage used and the kind of material that was used as research for the work. The aim is a peek into the “spectatorial” explains Stephen Connolly.

Attend the Screenings:
There is an opportunity to attend the screenings next month at the London Film Festival
Friday 12th October at ICA Screen 1  – 6.50pm
Saturday 20th October at  BFI Southbank NFT3 – 1.15pm

For more information or to book click here.

Double shortlisting for Kent in Times Higher Education Awards

The University of Kent has been shortlisted in the two categories for which it made submissions to the Times Higher Education (THE) Awards 2013: Excellence & Innovation in the Arts and ICT Initiative of the Year.

Kent’s shortlisting for Excellence & Innovation in the Arts is based on its recent programme of development, innovation and investment in this sector. This has resulted in the University not only consolidating its existing reputation as a first-choice arts destination for students but in it also becoming an arts champion and cultural hub forCanterburyMedway and the region. Kent’s successes in this area include:

Kent’s shortlisting for ICT Initiative of the Year reflects its commitment to develop and promote a high quality learning experience through innovative teaching methods. The focus of the submission is the development and use of ‘serious games’, or immersive technologies, to enable students and child protection professionals undertaking continuing professional development to practice and discuss difficult child protection cases in safe environments.

Developed by Professor David Shemmings and Dr Jane Reeves from Kent’s Centre for Child Protection, these games combine expertise from a number of the University’s units, disciplines and academic schools, as well as external experts from organisations such as Special Branch, Kent Police, Kent County Council, Kent Probation and Child Health Services (Essex). The resulting programme is considered to be a ‘trail blazer’ for Kent and is expected to set the standard for its future distance learning courses. Feedback from students, practitioners, local authorities, children’s homes, voluntary organisations, training providers and charities has also demonstrated the need for this new style of learning tool – one that is also a far reaching and impactful ICT solution to a range of virulent social problems.

Professor Dame Julia Goodfellow, the University’s Vice-Chancellor, said: ‘This is further good news for Kent in a year during which the University has been ranked among thetop 20 in the UK. It is also further recognition of Kent’s academic strengths and successes, as well as the impact it makes upon society at all levels. I congratulate all those involved in the shortlisted projects and offer them my best wishes for the awards ceremony.’

The winners of the THE Awards 2013 will be announced during a ceremony on 28 November at the Grosvenor House Hotel, London.

Barbara Morris Prize benefits students in Skills Enhancement Week

Teaching Prize Success – winners of the Barbara Morris Prize for Learning Support 2013

The School would like to congratulate Dr Paul Fretwell, Director of Learning and Teaching and Employability and Events Coordinator, Ann Howe who are joint winners of the Barbara Morris Prize for Learning Support 2013, along with the Student Support Team at the School of Arts at Canterbury, for their dedication and input into the ‘Skills Enhancement Week’ in February, 2013.

The Skills Enhancement Week took place between Monday 18th and Friday 22nd February, which replaced ‘Reading Week’, provided an invigorated forum and a focussed few days of informative and inspirational events for students to be able to enhance their skills leading to improved employability.

Students were able to earn University ‘Employability Points’ by attending these events and prizes were on offer to the student who attended the most sessions and the event went on to lead to a number of student placements and internships with organisations such as Microsoft Computer Games, Zealous, Earcom Ltd and other work experience opportunities.

The team were dedicated to securing an array of industry-recognised guest speakers who provided lively talks, along with a week’s schedule of mixed study skills and employability-related workshops.  Activities such as workshops on self-employment, entrepreneurship, developing partnerships and networking spanned the five days and there were personal and professional development workshops too, where students could learn about how to build and develop their online presence and how to ‘market’ themselves, hone their CV writing skills and learn about the Year Abroad possibilities.

The judging panel were impressed with the team’s employment-focussed student support, as the Skills Enhancement Week clearly enriched the student’s experiences and provided a model which could be emulated across other the other Schools. It was also deemed an excellent example of external engagement, benefiting both students and the University through collaboration.

‘The week proved to be a great success and was even opened up to other University students to attend’ said prize winner Ann Howe. ‘It provided a great opportunity for career networking for students with external industry employers and gave students a chance to think holistically about their education, develop an awareness of skills needed for future employment and to actively build their own employability’

The Barbara Morris Prize of £5,000 is awarded annually for outstanding work in the area of learning support. The University encourages applications from all staff in the University, including those who work with or for students in a teaching, non-teaching or support role.

Prizes will be awarded by the Vice-Chancellor at a dedicated lunchtime ceremony on Thursday 3rd October in Darwin Conference Suite at the Canterbury campus.

Read more about the Teaching Prizes

Research Seminar – Andrea Luka Zimmerman Presents

Fine Art Research Events Spring Term 2013

Tuesday 5 February
5-7pm, BWC 102

Andrea  Luka Zimmerman presents Estate: a reverie, an  artist’s film, song cycle and installation to be created and performed by the  disappearing community of the Haggerston Estate, East London.  It is the final and most ambitious project in  a trilogy of collaborative works on the estate led by artist resident Andrea  Luka Zimmerman, working closely with architectural researcher and writer David  Roberts, following the public art/photo-installation i am here (with Lasse  Johansson and Tristan Fenell) and the artists’ book Estate (Myrdle Court Press,  with Lasse Johansson, Paul Hallam, Cristina Cerully, Victor Buchli), both of  which have gained international acclaim.

Andrea Luka Zimmerman has been making films  since 1998, originally as part of a film collective called Vision Machine,  which worked predominately in Indonesia exploring the impact of Globalisation  and working directly with plantation workers. Her non fiction feature essay Prisoner of War, investigates US  militarism and foreign policy through a character study of one of its most  enduring rogue agents. She has just completed Taskafa: stories from the streets, a film about resistance and  co-existence told through the lives of street dogs in Istanbul. Estate, a reverie, is an essay film made  in collaboration with the residents of the about to be demolished housing  estate in Haggerston, Hackney, where she also lives.

Andrea is Associate Lecturer at Central St. Martins  College of Art and Design, and Wimbeldon College of Art [University of the Arts  London]. She teaches cinematography on the MA Documentary Practice at Brunel  University.

Fugitive Images: Fugitive  Images are Andrea Luka Zimmerman, Lasse Johansson and David  Roberts. Fugitive  Images platform grew out of a desire to capture the peculiar  moment of the place where they live and work immediately prior to it being  demolished. Haggerston Estate is suspended somewhere between it first being  occupied in the 1930’s and imminent demolition in 2009 (second phase of  demoloition is in 2013), a place in transformation, in wait.

View our Research Seminar webpage
View the Events Calendar

Research Seminar – Memory, Identity, Performance and Neuroscience: Part 1

Jointly hosted event between CKP and The Centre for Research into Sound, Image and Space (SISRC)

Friday March 1st, 5-6:30pm,

Medway Campus, Chatham Historic Dockyard

Bridge Warden’s College Lecture Theatre

Shona Illingworth (Fine Art lecturer and artist, School of Arts, Medway) discusses her collaboration with neuropsychologist, Catherine Loveday.

Their current project, in collaboration with cognitive neuropsychologist Martin A. Conway, is supported by the Wellcome Trust. Claire is a woman who has dense retrograde and anterograde amnesia. The project explores new biomedical insight into Claire’s condition, gained through research into her use of new sensory operated camera technology to unlock previously inaccessible memories. In parallel, the historical lesions in the physical and cultural landscape of St Kilda, an extraordinary archipelago located off the west coast of Scotland, provide a physical and metaphorical context within which to explore the self-experience of broken memory and dense cultural retrograde amnesia. Illingworth and Loveday will discuss how, by creating a multi-layered interplay between Claire and St Kilda, this project sets out to explore powerful synergies between the complex space of the mind, and that of the outside world, and in turn, examine the profound implications amnesia and cultural erasure have on the individual, social and cultural topologies that inform contemporary constructions of identity, place and location.

The second part of Memory, Identity, Performance and Neuroscience will take place in Autumn 2013. It will feature Anna Furse (Head of Theatre & Performance at Goldsmiths and Director of Athletes of the Heart),and Cambridge neuroscientist Nicky Clayton, in dialogue with Sian Stevenson and Jayne Thompson (StevensonThompson, Gulbenkian Theatre and School of Arts) on their ‘Moving Memory’ dance based projects.

Shona Illingworth

Shona Illingworth is an artist and Fine Art Lecturer in The School Arts, Medway, University of Kent. She works across sound, film, video, photography, drawing and painting. Major works using moving image and/or sound, take the form of gallery based and site specific installation. She has worked closely with scientists to explore individual and collective memory and the mapping of mental space onto external terrain, themes which are explored in the Film and Video Umbrella monograph on her work: The Watch Man – Balnakiel, Shona Illingworth (2011).
Her work has been exhibited widely, including at the Museum of Modern Art, Bologna, the Wellcome Collection, London, the National Museum, Tirana and Interaccess Electronic Media Arts Centre, Toronto and she has received high profile commissions from Film and Video Umbrella, the Hayward Gallery, London and Channel 4 Television.

Dr Catherine Loveday

Dr Catherine Loveday is a Principal Lecturer in Cognitive Science at the University of Westminster, London. She completed her PhD in 1996, investigating the neuropsychological basis of normal age-related memory loss.  Since this, she has continued to research the cognitive and biological changes that occur in ageing, particularly in relation to memory, but she has also extended her expertise to various clinical populations, for example traumatic brain injury, dementia, amnesia and hydrocephalus. This has included a significant amount of clinical work at the Chelsea and Westminster Hospital in London and Addenbrookes Hospital in Cambridge.
Her current research projects include the cognitive neuroscience of amnesia (with Prof Martin A. Conway); the psychobiology of adolescence (with the PSRG); the neurobiology of anorexia nervosa; neuropsychological implications in congenital hydrocephalus (with Joanna Iddon, Prof John Pickard and Richard Morgan); the cognitive psychology of music (with Ludovico Minati).
She plays an active role in the British Psychological Society contributing significantly to the organisation of annual conference as well as being a member of the Research Board and Psychologist Policy committee. She has also appeared as an expert psychologist in a number of television and radio programmes.

View our Research Seminar webpage
View the Events Calendar