Interested in studying architecture? Come along to our Virtual Open Day!

Interested in studying our BA (Hons) Architecture (RIBA/ARB Part 1) course, or our MArch (RIBA/ARB Part 2) course? Come along to Kent School of Architecture and Planning’s upcoming Virtual Open Day in collaboration with KMTV on Wednesday 29 July from 12.00 – 13.30 BST.

The schedule for the Virtual Open Day is as follows:

  • BA (Hons) Architecture (RIBA/ARB Part 1), 12.00 – 12.45 BST, click here to join
  • MArch (RIBA/ARB Part 2), 12.45 – 13.30 BST, click here to join

Our BA (Hons) Architecture degree is the first step towards qualifying as an architect. You study areas such as regeneration, sustainability, landscape, community, and urban life. You also develop the practical design skills needed within the profession. You are encouraged to be creative and experiment through models, drawings and digital representation – gaining confidence through your project work.

Find out more here with BA (Hons) Architecture Stage 2 Coordinator, Felicity Atekpe, and Stage 3 student, Amy, from 12.00 – 12.45 BST on Wednesday 29 July.

Our MArch architecture programme is a two-year (known as Stage 4 and Stage 5) full-time undergraduate professional programme focused on architectural design. It forms the second part of the UK’s traditional five-year continuum of professional undergraduate education in architecture.

You study modules covering design, technology, employability and cultural context. These place a prominent focus on your design skills, while also developing your understanding of sustainability, critical thinking and professional practice. Teaching is delivered through a unit system and generally involves a hypothetical design project. You work with a mix of Stage 4 and 5 students and learn through an iterative process, facilitated by seminars, tutorials and peer-to-peer learning. Additional lecture and seminar modules cover technology, cultural context, dissertation and employability.

Find out more here with MArch Programme Director, Michael Richards, and Stage 5 student, Andy, from 12.45 – 13.30 BST on Wednesday 29 July.

If you have any queries about the event, please feel free to email ksapadmissions@kent.ac.uk.

KSAP’s Jonathan Tarbatt and Chloe Street Tarbatt are delighted to announce publication of, ‘The Urban Block’

BA (Hons) Architecture Programme Director, Chloe Street Tarbatt, and Lecturer, Jonathan Tarbatt are delighted to announce the publication of their new book on urban form: ‘The Urban Block: a guide for urban designers, architects and town planners’.

The Urban Block explores the influence of urban form on the quality of the built environment, and by extension, on the quality of life of its inhabitants.

The book maps the process of understanding, defining, structuring and designing the block. Outlining a taxonomy of urban forms, it explains the potency of each type to either unite or divide communities: to create walkable neighbourhoods or car dominated ones; to foster a sense a community or a sense of isolation, or; to provide a setting in which the theatre of street life may flourish or wither. These themes are illustrated with a range of case urban and suburban examples, showing how different building typologies have been articulated through different urban forms, and what this might mean for the people who live in them.

The authors find that ‘good’ urban design starts with ‘good’ urban form: the block. Yet, their case examples demonstrate that while good urban form is more likely to produce the kinds of places we want to live, it takes more than either good urban design or good architecture, to achieve these. Excellent design across the full range of scales must be integrated through innovative procurement routes, if we are to produce high-quality living environments that are somehow greater than the sum of their parts.

Stage 2 student wins The Elaine Lloyd Davis Drawing Workshop Bursary

A big congratulations to BA (Hons) Architecture Stage 2 student, Felicity Pike, for her success in winning one of four bursary places as part of The Elaine Lloyd Davis 5th Drawing Workshop Bursary. The Bursary covers travel and accommodation for a tutored Drawing Workshop weekend taking place in Toulouse in April 2020.

KSAP students take part in Canterbury Mosque competition

Kent School of Architecture and Planning (KSAP) students were recently invited to take part in a competition to redesign the exterior of the current building of the Canterbury Mosque. The brief, set by Raschid Sowahon, Chairman of Canterbury Mosque located on Giles lane, outlined the following, ‘The Canterbury Mosque was originally a residential building that has been converted into a Mosque. Several extensions have been added to the building to accommodate the growing number of Muslim students and local residents who use the facilities.  We are negotiating with the Council Planning department to enhance the architectural values of this area by presenting a building that is recognisable for what it is used for. It should be an iconic building that will add to the already rich cultural heritage that Canterbury offers. We are looking at creating a frontage of the Mosque that will reflect Islamic architectural design.’

The winners and runners up were awarded their prizes last week at an event organised by Canterbury Mosque. A big congratulations to the winning entry, designed by Stage 3 students Adam Dudley-Mallick and Erlend Birkeland. The 2nd prize went to Canan Iscan, and the 3rd and 4th prizes went to Freda Odonye and Garima Rai.

Adam Dudley-Mallick and Erlend Birkeland, BA (Hons) Architecture Stage 3
Garima Rai, BA (Hons) Architecture Stage 3
Freda Odonye, BA (Hons) Architecture Stage 3

Kent School of Architecture and Planning hosting Virtual Open Day

Kent School of Architecture and Planning are pleased to announce that we will be hosting a Virtual Open Day on Thursday 7th November from 11.00 –  12.30 GMT.

If you are interested in finding out more about the BA (Hons) Architecture course at the Kent School of Architecture and Planning, including course structure, entry requirements, portfolio advice, then please email ksapadmissions@kent.ac.uk to book onto our first ever Virtual Open Day in collaboration with KMTV.

The Virtual Open Day will be accessible through You Tube where you will be able to ask questions live, this is the link you will need on the day – https://youtu.be/KLE3pfqc9IQ

This is the perfect opportunity to find out more about the Kent School of Architecture and Planning, and have your questions answered by our BA (Hons) Architecture programme director, Chloe Street Tarbatt, Stage 2 Coordinator, Felicity Atekpe, and CREAte Research Centre Director, Dr Timothy Brittain-Catlin who will be hosting the event.

The Kent Historic Buildings Committee announces The Gravett Award 2019 winner

This year’s annual Gravett Award event took place on Friday 24 May in the Digital Crit Space. The Gravett Award, created by The Kent Historic Buildings Committee, a specialist unit of CPRE Kent, is given to a BA (Hons) Architecture student at Kent School of Architecture and Planning (KSAP) for the best observational drawing or drawings of existing buildings or structures produced during this academic year.

The award is named after Kenneth Gravett (1930-1999), an archaeologist, who, through his exceptional study and knowledge of historic buildings, has left an outstanding record of Kentish building vernacular. The prize is designed to encourage students to record existing buildings by hand-drawing, either in perspective or orthographic drawings, or sketches. The judging panel for this year’s Gravett award included the distinguished conservation architects Clive Bowley, Ptolemy Dean and Stuart Page.

This year, the competition was carried out as part of the BA (Hons) Architecture Stage 1 module, ‘Ancient and Medieval Architecture’, convened by Dr Nikolaos Karydis. One of the assignments in this module asks students to visit and draw a Norman building in Kent. The following eight students were shortlisted: Victoria Dolfo, Ayako Seki, Felicity Pike, Nuriye Celik, Rebecca Jilks, Alexandra-Stefania Barbu, Matthew Manganga and Michael Zapletal.

The winner of this year’s award is Ayako Seki who will be formally presented with the award at this year’s End of Year Show on 14 June 2019.

KSA students design dystopian future as part of AIA Student Charrette 2018

The Kent School of Architecture entered this year’s AIA Student Charrette competition, held at the Roca Gallery in London. The team consisted of Edoardo Avellino, Ben Child, Ines Combalat, Kyle McGuinness, Jake Obichere and  Christine Wong from Stage 3, BA (Hons) Architecture.

The competition saw an array of participants from six universities and with the hope of continuing last year’s success as winners, a different challenge was posed. A daylong event, full of creativity, set the scene for a promising project. Set in Chelsea, at Lots Road Auction House, the brief for the day was split into two parts; i.e. to choose an object within the auction house, in order to describe its journey from the seller to the buyer, whilst imagining the process of the object in spatial and architectural form.

At the Lots Road Auction House, a member of staff gave a short talk about the type of items that are sold and the process of auctioning itself. Particular points stood out to us as we began searching for a concept. We were interested in how the bidding process had changed as technology and the world around had advanced, creating an auction house which worked mainly digitally now. This provoked us to speculate about the future of the auction house and how it may evolve as time goes on. Another interesting facet to the auction house is the bidding process itself and how people spend large amounts of money on items that they do not particularly want or need. This led us try to create a design that would match the drama of the bidding war in its architecture. These influences manifested in an imagined dystopian world where water is scarce and one of its few sources are sheets of ice, imported from the arctic, to be bid on in the Lots Road Auction House. This highlights how an item that is currently taken for granted should have much more value than we attribute to it and plays with the idea of exaggerating the tension within the auction house by bidding on a rare necessity.

In this scenario, we imagine that the Lots Road Auction House begins to sell ‘fresh, pure water from Arctic ice’ to its wealthy clientele, but as the conventional means of acquiring water becomes more restricted, demand increases for the Arctic-water. Due to this increased demand, the Lots Road Auction House moves in to the nearby power station and begins shipping in sheets of ice via the Thames. A shard of ice hangs between the two chimneys of the power station, slowly dripping in to a glass below it. The glass sits on a plinth in the centre of the power station, surrounded by hopeful bidders. Every time the ice drips in to the glass, a bid has to be made and when there is a drip with no bid, the most recent bidder lifts the glass from the plinth and drinks from it, replicating the hammer moment in the traditional auction house. As the bids are made, the new price is projected onto the side of the ice and the number of lights within the power station rise as the bid increases, elevating the tension of the process. From the outside, the city of London looks on as a level in the power station chimneys decreases, representing the ever-diminishing amounts of ice left in the Arctic. This in turn creates panic in the city, making its inhabitants flock to the power station to bid on water, once more increasing its value and adding to the intense nature of the bidding process. We portrayed this transformation of the Lots Road Auction House with various collages, models, sketches and drawings.

Overall, the judges were looking for a more conventional version of the auction house rather than the surreal proposal we developed. In the end, it was the students from the University of Westminster who succeeded to take this year’s title as winners of the AIA Student Charrette 2018. We learnt a lot during this CAD-free event, and it enabled us to be as creative as possible, learning how to respond to a brief through the methodologies of hand-drawing and model making.

We would like to congratulate the winning team and thank Amrita Raja, our mentor for the day, ROCA and Laufen for supporting yet another successful event.

By Jake Obichere and Ben Child
Stage 3, BA (Hons) Architecture

Dancing through the Veil: the great KSA debate

On Thursday 22 November, CREAte (Centre for Research in European Architecture) will be hosting a great debate on the direction of design teaching in the School. CREAte have invited four leading guests to join a conversation about the broader aims of the upcoming Stage 3 BA (Hons) Architecture Collective Dwelling and Architectural Design projects.

CREAte’s guests will be Charles Holland, the architect of the House for Essex; Catherine Slessor, critic, and former editor of the Architectural Review; Ruth Lang, design tutor at CSM and historian of public housing in London, and the well known architect Richard Reid, whose Epping Forest Town Hall is one of the great masterpieces of British postmodernism and has recently been listed for conservation by Historic England.

The debate is open to all, and will take place in Grimond Lecture Theatre 1 from 5.30-7pm on Thursday 22nd November, supported by KASA (Kent Architectural Student Association).

Stage 1 BA (Hons) Architecture students bring Zenobia to life

Stage 1 students on the BA (Hons) Architecture course have brought Italo Calvino’s ‘Zenobia’, from his novel Invisible Cities, to life in their first mini project as part of AR318 Form Finding module.

Invisible Cities was initially written as a travel guide in 1972 in Italian by the Cuban writer Italo Calvino. The book explores the power of words and the imagination; an explorer, Marco Polo, describes a series of imaginary cities to the emperor, Kublai Khan. They are prose poems, probably inspired by Venice, which illustrate many aspects of the city; its culture, language, time, memory and death and through these they offer the reader an insight into the human experience. Over the course of two weeks, the students worked on their interpretations of a passage from the classic novel which describes the city of Zenobia, through illustrations and model-making.

MA Architectural Visualisation student, Olegk Stathopoulos, documented the assembly of their take on Zenobia outside the Marlowe Building and created a great short film which you can watch here.

KSA Student Exhibition ‘Visions for Chatham Docks’

Kent School of Architecture are delighted to present this public exhibition of selected Stage 3 student work from the BA (Hons) Architecture course during 2017/18. The three design projects were all linked and based at Chatham Historic Dockyard on the river Medway in Kent; a site of significant historical interest and of conservation merit. This exhibition presents selected proposals designed to transition the past into the future. KSA worked closely with the Dockyard Trust, Medway Council and the University of Kent Medway throughout the year.

The Autumn term project ‘Urban Intervention’ has two components: The first, to design a masterplan developing a future vision for the site through making proposals for new-build insertions, changes of use to existing buildings, and landscaping. The second, an ‘Adapt and Extend’ project to re-design one of three pre-selected buildings into a ‘multi-generational care facility’ including a nursery and accommodation for the elderly.

The Spring term project ‘Architectural Design’ asks students to design a new-build multi-use building on a site of their choice within their masterplan. The project was entitled “One World Workshop’ and had a programme of rentable, bookable, and flexible spaces.

This exhibition, curated jointly by Kent School of Architecture tutors Chloe Street Tarbatt, Maria Araya and Henry Sparks, publicly showcases a snapshot of these projects. We hope it will serve to increase the awareness and impact of our activities at KSA within and beyond the confines of the university, sparking curiosity and debate with the general public.

The Preview for the exhibition will be held on Friday 13 July at the Chatham Historic Dockyard Visitor Centre from 15.30 – 17.30, with the opening presentation at 16.00. The exhibition will remain open to the public 10.00 – 18.00 daily until 26 July.