Clio Bernard: Inaugural Ida Lupino Lecture (29.11.2017)

 

Ida Lupino was a pioneering woman filmmaker who achieved the unlikely feat of being a writer-director-producer-star hyphenate.

Her noted films include High Sierra, Never Fear, Outrage, On Dangerous Ground, The Hitch-Hiker, The Bigamist and Junior Bonner.

She was also born (1918) in Herne Hill, London, so has a relationship with London and the South-East. In 2015 the School of Arts named its new cinema after her.

We are delighted to welcome acclaimed British writer-director Clio Barnard (The Arbor, The Selfish Giant and the forthcoming Dark River) to give our inaugural Ida Lupino Lecture.

The Ida Lupino Lecture is an opportunity to celebrate and underline Kent’s links with women filmmakers, by formalising Kent’s profile, and identity, as a place for women filmmakers.

Each year a prominent female British filmmaker will give a one-hour lecture on or around the subject of women in the British film industry. Running alongside the lecture will be a micro-festival of screenings – at the Lupino – of the guest filmmaker’s work.

Film at Kent has a link with women filmmakers both in its film practice staff (Clio Barnard, Sarah Turner, Virginia Pitts, Lucy Cash, Heather Green) and in its encouragement, development and promotion of women filmmakers from within its film practice students.

The lecture will be held on Wednesday 29th November 2017, in Grimond Lecture Theatre 3, 5pm

 

PCP Lunchtime talk: Oliver Double, Jonjo Brady, Little Tich: Size and Identity (07/12/2017)

The Popular and Comic Performance Research Centre (PCP) invite you to a talk as part of Disability History Month.

 Thursday 7th December 2017 at 12:00-13:00 hrs in Rutherford Lecture Theatre 3

 Oliver Double and Jonjo Brady, Little Tich: Size and Identity

 We are proud to present a lunchtime talk on entertainer extraordinaire, Little Tich (1867 – 1928), as part of Disability History Month at the University of Kent. Little Tich was a star of that most British of institutions, the music hall, and left an indelible mark on British culture. Standing at 4’6″, Tich played on his size in his acts, raising complex issues about his identity and the importance of physicality to the popular entertainer. Join Olly Double and Jonjo Brady as they explore the identity and size of an individual who helped to shape British comedy and gave the English language a new word.

 For a full programme of events for Disability History Month at the University of Kent visit: www.kent.ac.uk/dhm

 

AHVC Research Talk: Curating the Poetry of Form (06.12.2017)

The Art History & Visual Cultures Research Centre invites you to a research seminar with

Eric Robertson, Professor of Modern French Literary and Visual Culture at Royal Holloway, University of London

Curating the Poetry of Form

Wednesday 6th December 2017 at 6pm in Keynes Seminar Room 15, University of Kent

‘Arp: the Poetry of Forms’, currently showing at Turner Contemporary, is the first large-scale exhibition of Hans Jean Arp’s work in the UK since 1962. An important figure of Dada, Surrealism and Abstraction, Arp also influenced British Modernism. His diverse practice had a poetry and playfulness at its core that is as engaging for audiences today as it was in his lifetime. This landmark exhibition comprises around 80 loans, the majority of which have never been on display in the UK. Organised in collaboration with the Kröller-Müller Museum in the Netherlands, the exhibition was curated by Frances Guy and Professor Eric Robertson. In his talk, Eric Robertson will chart the challenges and pitfalls of this lengthy project from conception to completion.

Eric Robertson is Professor of Modern French Literary and Visual Culture at Royal Holloway, University of London. He is the author of Writing Between the Lines: René Schickele, citoyen français, deutscher Dichter 1883-1940 (Rodopi, 1995), Arp: Painter, Poet, Sculptor (Yale University Press, 2006, winner of the R. H. Gapper Book Prize),  Arp: The Poetry of Forms (Kröller-Müller Museum, 2017) and Blaise Cendrars and the Artistic Avant-Garde (Reaktion Books, forthcoming 2018). He is co-editor of Yvan Goll – Claire Goll: Texts and Contexts (Rodopi 1997, with Robert Vilain), Robert Desnos: Surrealism in the 21st Century (Peter Lang, 2006, with Marie-Claire Barnet and Nigel Saint), Dada and Beyond: Vol. 1: Dada Discourses and Vol. 2: Dada and its Legacies (Rodopi 2011 and 2012, with Elza Adamowicz). He has worked and published with museums including Almine Rech Gallery (New York), Arp Museum (Rolandseck), Stiftung Arp (Berlin), Cabaret Voltaire (Zurich), Hauser & Wirth (London, Los Angeles, New York and Zurich) and Musée d’Art Moderne et Contemporain de Strasbourg.

A symposium exploring the work of Hans Jean Arp in conjunction with the exhibition Arp: The Poetry of Forms at Turner Contemporary. Organised by Turner Contemporary in partnership with the School of Modern Languages, Literatures and Cultures, Royal Holloway, University of London.To register for the symposium, visit: https://www.turnercontemporary.org/whats-on/category/symposium

AHVC Research Talk: Collecting Raphael’s drawings in an artist workshop (14.11.2017)

The Art History & Visual Cultures Research Centre invites you to a research seminar with

Claudia La Malfa, The American University of Rome

Collecting Raphael’s drawings in an artist workshop. Francesco Villamena’s prints after Raphael and his collection of Raphael’s drawings

Tuesday 14th November 2017 at 6pm in Keynes Seminar Room 6, University of Kent

Francesco Villamena, born in Assisi, c. 1564, was an appreciated print maker active in Rome from the end of the 16th century until his sudden death in 1624. From the archival inventories discovered and published by Franca Trinchieri Camiz in 1994, emerges that Villamena had an important works of art collection.

His collection included classical statues, 15th- and 16th-centuries prints, paintings and drawings of the old masters, a few of which were attributed to Raphael. Villamena’s activity as a print maker, and his etchings of Raphael’s works, show how Raphael was popular at the beginning of the century. His print of the 16th century copy of the de’ Medici’s Madonna dell’Impannata found in the collection of Neapolitan aristocrat Matteo di Capua demonstrates how Raphael’s paintings, even his good quality copies, were considered to mark the high social status of a collector. This paper intends to argue that Villamena’s collection exemplifies a crucial historical moment in the history of collection of Raphael’s paintings and drawings. Villamena’s collection of Raphael’s drawings shows that at the beginning of the 17th century the old master’s drawings were collected not only for the use of the artists and their workshops, but also as objects of artistic value destined to enter the art market. Finally, it will be shown how an important finito drawing produced by Raphael during his early years of activity, and today in the Uffizi’s Prints and Drawings Department, was in Villamena’s collection at the beginning of the 17th century.

Claudia La Malfa lives and works in Rome, Italy. She received her PhD from the Warburg Institute, University of London, in 20013, and taught at the University of St Andrews, Naples and Ravenna. She currently teaches History of Art at the American University of Rome, where she holds courses for undergraduate students and for MA students at the University of Kent in Rome. Since 2015 she is Visiting Lecturer of the University of Kent. She published the book Pintoricchio Fresco Cycles and the Revival of the Antique, Silvana Editoriale 2008 (funded by the Commission for Ecclesiastical Heritage), and has extensively published in peer-review journals and collected volumes on Botticelli’s Primavera, Filippino Lippi’s drawings, Bernardino Pintoricchio’s frescoes, Renaissance sculptors in Rome, history of collecting, and the revival of antique in the Renaissance.

T24 – Frantic Assembly Workshop

T24 is offering 24 drama students the opportunity to participate in a 2-hour workshop they have arranged with Frantic Assembly next Wednesday, 1st November between 4.30pm and 6.30pm in Jarman 2 at a cost of £2.00 per person. 

If you wish to enter the ballot then you need to email before Tuesday, 31st dramasoc.committee@gmail.com clearly stating your name and contact details.

​To ensure parity of opportunity a ballot will be held next Tuesday, 31st October at midday to draw the names of the 24 participants.  If you are interested, you can find out more information at the following link:

https://www.facebook.com/events/129507124436419??ti=ia

 

A Show That Gambles on the Future

The Popular and Comic Performance Research Centre (PCP) invite you to a Public Engagement Event

Post-show discussion with Mark Thomas, following A Show That Gambles on the Future

Wednesday 22 November, 7.30pm, Gulbenkian Theatre, University of Kent

Tickets: https://uk.patronbase.com/_Gulbenkian/Productions/CRT/Performances

 More about the PCP Research Centre

The Popular and Comic Performance (PCP) research centre brings together academics from a range of disciplines (e.g. Drama, Film, Social Anthropology, Philosophy). Our research investigates a real variety of related areas including: stand-up comedy; music hall and variety; 18th century popular theatre; melodrama; Greek Old and Middle comedy; community performance work; puppetry; TV and film production; and punk performance.

 

‘Training the Popular Performer’ Book Launch Event

The Popular and Comic Performance Research Centre (PCP) invite you to a Book Launch Event

Adam Ainsworth (De Montfort University), Olly Double and Sophie Quirk present the launch of the edited volume Popular Performance (Bloomsbury, 2017) and a special issue of the journal Theatre, Dance and Performance Training, entitled ‘Training the Popular Performer’

There is no fourth wall in popular performance. The show is firmly rooted in the here and now, and the performers address the audience directly, while the audience answer back with laughter, applause or heckling. Performer and role are interlaced, so that we are left uncertain about just how the persona we see onstage might relate to the private person who presents it to us.

Popular Performance defines and surveys varieties of performance where the main purpose is to entertain, and where there is no shame in being trivial, frivolous or nonsensical as long as people go home happy at the end of the show. Contributions by new and established scholars focus particularly on how it is made, explaining the techniques of performance and production that make it so appealing to audiences.

Monday 6 November, 6pm, Aphra Theatre, University of Kent

Wine and nibbles will most definitely be served (NB Just emphasizing the ‘free wine’ aspect of this event)

More about the PCP Research Centre

The Popular and Comic Performance (PCP) research centre brings together academics from a range of disciplines (e.g. Drama, Film, Social Anthropology, Philosophy). Our research investigates a real variety of related areas including: stand-up comedy; music hall and variety; 18th century popular theatre; melodrama; Greek Old and Middle comedy; community performance work; puppetry; TV and film production; and punk performance.

 

Hollywood Stardom – The End: Stars, Genre and the Redefinition of Commercial Popularity in Conglomerate Hollywood

Paul McDonald (Kings College London)

 

Wednesday 15 November, 5pm – Keynes Lecture Theatre 5

Whatever happened to Hollywood film stardom? Throughout the 1990s, the top tier of Hollywood’s North American domestic box office was annually populated by hits fronted by major star names, mainly associated with action and, to a lesser extent, comedy. From the following decade onwards, however, the value of Hollywood stars diminished at the box office. Instead, animated and various forms of fantasy-inspired film series came to define the most commercially popular form of Hollywood film. This paper has two main purposes, one conceptual, the other historical. Initially the paper offers a critique of how neglect of the economic status of film has left film scholarship with unsatisfactory conceptualizations of genre and stardom. Departing from this tendency, the paper outlines a form of analysis aimed at situating generic formations and star identities in the commercial context of the film market. Secondly, the paper uses this approach to explore the historical transition that saw the waning of star value and the rise of animated and fantasy film series redefining commercial popularity for conglomerate Hollywood. Reflecting on this context, the paper concludes by outlining a series of ways in which stardom still plays a significant – although diminished – role in shaping commercial popularity.

Biography

Paul McDonald is Professor of Cultural and Creative Industries, and Vice Dean (People and Planning) for Arts at King’s College London. His work on stars includes Hollywood Stardom (2013) and The Star System: Hollywood’s Production of Popular Identities (2000). His book George Clooney and Modern Hollywood will be published next year in the British Film Institute’s film stars series. He is a co-editor of Hollywood and the Law (2015) and The Contemporary Hollywood Film Industry (2008), and of the International Screen Industries series from the British Film Institute (2003- ).

At Home with Horror? Terror on the Small Screen

For those of you who have a taste for, and interest in horror and/or television studies, there is a conference on television horror taking place on campus over the weekend of 27th – 29th October. All are welcome!

 At Home with Horror? Terror on the Small Screen, has been organized by the Melodrama Research Group and is supported by the Centre for Film and Media Research. The primary question the conference aims to engage with is whether it is on the small screen that critical and creative innovations in horror are now taking place. The event will revisit the history of the genre by reflecting on seminal works of television horror whilst also seeking to understand how the expansion of satellite television and online sites have impacted the genre. In addressing these questions the conference will underline the importance of the small screen for horror and ask, is the small screen now the home of horror?

 Registration fees are, £45 waged and £25 for unwaged. If you would like to attend (and we hope you will!), you can register for the conference using the online store which can be accessed via the following link.

 http://store.kent.ac.uk/product-catalogue/faculty-of-humanities/school-of-arts/arts-events/at-home-with-horror-terror-on-the-small-screen

 Our keynote address,‘Haunted landscapes: trauma and grief in the television ghost story’, will be delivered by Dr. Helen Wheatley, (University of Warwick). An abstract can be found on our website and accessed here, https://tvhomeofhorror.wordpress.com/keynote/

 If you would like further information on the conference, At Home with Horror? Terror on the Small Screen, you will find the full programme of speakers and abstract from the keynote address when you visit our website, https://tvhomeofhorror.wordpress.com/

 We do hope the conference will be of interest of you and we look forward to welcoming you to the conference over Halloween weekend!

 If you have any questions, please do not hesitate to contact us at, horrorishome@gmail.com .