Upcoming Digital Architecture Open Lecture: Christopher Leung, The Bartlett School of Architecture

The next Digital Architecture open lecture will be given by Dr Christopher Leung from The Bartlett School of Architecture with his talk titled, ‘Digital fabrication: Dialogue through manufacturing processes’ on Tuesday 12 February at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Architects have become accustomed to designing the physical fabric of buildings using digital tools. However, in an age of advanced manufacturing where there are possibilities enabled by the adoption of robotics and automation that are now widely available to architectural practice, architects are increasingly designing processes as much as components and assemblies. In this shift, architects can have a role to “Design for” aspects of these processes, where a given process can be for “Assembly”, “Disassembly” or “Measurement” to name a few.

Reflecting on the “Design for” considerations found in other industries such as automotive and aerospace, this lecture surveys a selection of the possibilities now afforded by digital fabrication and considers the implication for design options at the interface between digital representation and processes of making. These are presented through a series of case-study projects that have been carried out in collaboration with other educators, researchers and industry practitioners as well as current work at the Bartlett.

Christopher Leung trained as an architect at the Bartlett with experience in architectural and environmental design practice. He completed his engineering doctorate at UCL on passive variable performance facades. He is the programme director of the Masters in Design for Manufacture at UCL Here East, the new centre dedicated to making based at Stratford in east London.

He has worked on government-funded research projects into low-energy building technology, proof-of-concept build projects and post-doc research on the environmental evaluation of bio-receptive concrete. He has taught at the Bartlett in the Interactive Architecture Lab, BiotA Lab and the M.Sc in Architectural computation. He also carries out research into solar activated materials including bi-metals and shape memory alloys for novel applications in the facades of buildings to improve energy performance in collaboration with leading industry partners.

All welcome!

CREAte Open Lecture: ‘Pedagogy and Practice – a long view of architectural education’

The next CREAte Open Lecture will be given by Alan Powers with his talk titled, ‘Pedagogy and Practice – a long view of architectural education’. The open lecture will take place on Tuesday 19 February 2019 at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

That you cannot learn architecture until you do it, and you cannot do it until you have learnt it remains a paradox of this discipline. Alan Powers will look at crises and episodes of change in the past 140 years of architectural education in Britain and elsewhere, and ask whether it is a uniquely problematic subject, or simply one in which vested interests have usually stood in the way of common sense.

Alan Powers chose as his PhD subject ‘Architectural Education in Britain 1880-1914’. He has continued to be interested in training both as an expression of changing architectural ideals through history and as a significant factor in transmitting them. Not having studied architecture himself, he has had opportunities to observe the mystifying process in action at the Prince of Wales’s Institute and the University of Greenwich, and currently at the London School of Architecture and University of Westminster.

All welcome!

KASA Open Lecture: Fred Pillbrow, Pillbrow & Partners

The upcoming KASA (Kent Architectural Student Association) open lecture will be given by Fred Pillbrow, one of the founding partners of Pillbrow & Partners on Tuesday 5th February at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Fred has over 25 years’ experience working in sensitive historic environments and with listed buildings in the UK and abroad. Besides the mixed-used urban masterplan in Birmingham with a Grade I listed train station at its heart, the practice is restoring Sir Christopher Wren’s Grade I listed St Mary’s Somerset in the City of London and the Grade II listed Walthamstow Granada Cinema. He has also been responsible for designing a number of significant London projects including the Heron Tower in the City of London whilst a Partner at KPF and the Francis Crick Institute at St Pancras whilst a Partner at PLP Architecture. Fred currently chairs the Design Review Panel of Hammersmith & Fullham and teaches at Yale University.

All welcome!

Upcoming CASE Open Lecture presents John Mardaljevic

The next CASE Open Lecture will be given by John Mardaljevic, with his talk titled, ‘New York Times to Central Park Tower: Daylight Modelling for Performance, Planning and Conservation’ on Tuesday 29 January 2019 at 6PM in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

When completed in 2020, Central Park Tower (New York City) will become the world’s tallest residential building and the second tallest skyscraper in the US. Measures of daylight injury predicted using climate-based daylight modelling (CBDM) formed part of the legal agreement for the design/development of the tower. This is the first instance, anywhere in the world, where daylight injury predicted using CBDM has played a substantive part in the legal agreement for the development of a building. NYC was also the location for a landmark daylight simulation project that began in 2004: daylighting the New York Times Building (architect Renzo Piano). At the time, the New York Times study greatly pushed the limits of what was believed to be achievable using daylight simulation on a live building project. These two milestone projects encompass a period where CBDM transitioned from a novel idea with potential to the mainstay for both research and practice worldwide. This lecture will illustrate real-world application of CBDM in diverse areas using the examples from New York City together with others from code compliance and heritage/conservation.

All welcome!

CREAte Open Lecture: Professor Barbara Penner, ‘Cuddlefication’

The first CREAte Open Lecture will be given by Professor Barbara Penner, ‘Cuddleficition’ on Tuesday 22 January at 6PM in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

‘Cuddlefication’ refers to a pervasive new phenomenon in the design of public spaces. Public spaces, including libraries and museums, are softening under the influence of free wifi: users are being encouraged to spend time in, linger in and even recline in public – a lopsided arrangement in which it feels normal to lie down on the floor of a national institution to work or nap or both. This talk suggests that cuddlefication is one result of the way digital technologies are being grafted onto our analogue lives, a process that changes bodies, work patterns, spaces and the protocols that govern their use. The new city is not only smart; it is soft.

Barbara Penner is Professor in Architectural Humanities at the Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL. She is author of Bathroom (2013), awarded the 2014 RIBA President’s Award for Outstanding University-Located Research. She is co-editor of Sexuality and Gender at Home (2017) and Gender Space Architecture (Routledge, 2000). She is a regular contributor to the architectural journals Places and Architectural Review.

 

Digital Architecture Open Lecture: The Ecology of Intelligence, in Nature and in Civilisation

The first open lecture of 2019 will be hosted by Digital Architecture, and given by Dr Michael Weinstock on Tuesday 15 January 2019 at 6PM in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

It is commonly said that cities are complex systems, and exhibit many of the properties of living beings. The application of terms like ‘Smart’ or ‘Adaptive’ to subsidiary urban systems is ubiquitous but an exegesis of a model of intelligence specific to the city is more rarely encountered in the literature of complexity sciences.Successful living species have evolved sentience and responsive behaviour specific to the ecological system within which they exist. It follows that ‘ecological intelligence’ cannot be approached through models of ‘general intelligence’ but can only be approached through observation and analysis of the dynamics of inter-species and species- environment relationships across a range of spatial and temporal scales within each particular ecology. What is the significance of this definition of intelligence in understanding the evolutionary development of cities? Can a design paradigm for future cities be developed from this perspective?

Dr. Michael Weinstock is an architect and academic whose publications have been focused on the dynamics, forms and energy transactions of natural systems, and the abstraction and systematisation of knowledge of biological morphogenesis and evolution to contribute to innovative computational processes of architectural design and materialisation that are necessary to sustain human societies through the impending changes. The current research focus is on defining new models of ecological intelligence for future cities in a changed world, with a special focus on developing new paradigms new paradigms for intelligent settlements in the emergent climates and ecological contexts of the future, concentrating on deserts, salt marshes and wetlands, and on the tundra.

All welcome!

KASA Open Lecture: Matthew Butcher, founder of P.E.A.R.

The last Kent School of Architecture open lecture of 2018 will be hosted by KASA (Kent Architectural Student Association), and will be given by Matthew Butcher, editor and founder of P.E.A.R. (Paper for Emerging Architectural Research) and Senior Lecturer in architecture at the Bartlett School of Architecture. The lecture, entitled, ‘Provocation and Performance’, will take place on Tuesday 27 November at 6PM in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Matthew Butcher is an academic, writer and designer. His work has been exhibited at the V&A Museum, London; Storefront for Art and Architecture, New York; The Architecture Foundation, London and the Prague Quadrennial, Prague. Recent projects and exhibitions include ‘2EmmaToc/Writtle Calling’ a temporary radio station in Essex,  ‘Flood House’ a floating architecture developed for Southend and ‘The Mansio’, a retreat for writers and poets, which was nominated for the 2017 Architects Journal Small Projects Prize. Matthew is also the editor and founder of the architectural newspaper P.E.A.R.: Paper for Emerging Architectural Research and Senior Lecturer in Architecture at the Bartlett School of Architecture; where he is also Director of the Undergraduate Architecture Programme.   He has contributed articles and papers for journals including Conditions, Architecture Research Quarterly (ARQ), the RIBA Journal and Architecture Today. He is also Guest Editor, along with Luke Pearson, for the upcoming special issue of AD titled Re-Imagining the Avant-Garde: revisiting the architecture of the 1960s and 1970s.

Matthew Butcher’s work, formed of designs, actions and events, operates as a provocation within particular social, cultural and political contexts associated with the inhabitation of suburban and rural environments.  This includes coastal sites in Essex affected by rising sea levels or the neglect of abandoned mines in the South West of England. Manifesting as built structures, events, drawings and scaled models, the work explores spaces and forms that are performative. That is to say, the material state of the architecture changes, or is perceived to change, in relationship to conditions such as the environments in which they are located, or through the actions of the people who inhabit them. Cross referencing his practice with the work of architects and artists working across the disciplines of art, architecture and performance in the 1970’s, Butcher will seek to ask whether we can, through the re-contextualization of historical models, re-enact an architectural Avant-Garde today? And he will question what the use of this mode of practice can mean to the future of the discipline?

Digital Architecture Open Lecture: ‘Autonomous Additive Manufacturing on Mars’

The next Digital Architecture Open Lecture will be given by Josef Musil, Associate and Computational Designer at Foster +  Partners, with his talk, ‘Autonomous Additive Manufacturing on Mars’ which is due to take place on Tuesday 30th October at 6PM in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Designing an outpost for a long-duration scientific expedition to an extreme environment such as Mars requires the basic qualities of functionality, comfort, and security. In this presentation we look at the key environmental conditions that govern the functionality of a Martian habitat and what it takes to design and build a comfortable home for a crew of four for 500 days with limited communication with Earth and most critically, how to ensure mission success, safety, and robustness through increased redundancy. These factors are collected here into a conceptual design proposal and multi-robot additive regolith construction system. This work is part of ongoing research at F+P specialist modelling group on robotics, large-scale additive construction, and architecture for extreme environments.

Josef Musil is an associate and a computational designer at Foster + Partners in London, where he is part of the research and parametric design oriented Specialist Modelling Group. In his work he focuses on applied research, application of new technologies, and algorithmic design to complex architectural and geometrical challenges.

Some of the projects he worked on include Safra neuron screen, where he built a generative model of a small section of brain also called cortical column with an automated workflow that reads 3D scans of neuroscientific scans as well as implements structural analysis and manufacturing constraints.

He also specialises on the application of small robotics within the office. This has been demonstrated by a working functional prototype of a small number of 3D printing swarm based robots for a NASA organized Mars habitat competition where Foster and Partners received second place. Other projects include a kinetic lighting sculpture activated by muscle wires and reacting to live brain wave signal reads.

First KASA Open Lecture of the academic year: CJ Lim

The first KASA (Kent Architectural Student Association) Open Lecture of the year will be given by CJ Lim, Professor of Architecture and Urbanism at The Bartlett, UCL, and founder of Studio 8 Architects, on Tuesday 23rd October at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

CJ Lim’s talk entitled, ‘Inhabitable Infrastructures: Science fiction or urban future?’ is the follow up to ‘Food City’ and ‘Smartcities and Eco-Warriors’, explores the potential of climate change-related multi-use infrastructures that address the fundamental human requirements to protect, to provide and to participate. The stimulus for the infrastructures of resilience derives from postulated scenarios and processes gleaned from science fiction and futurology as well as current body of scientific knowledge regarding changing impacts on cities. JG Ballard has written that the psychological realm of science fiction is most valuable in its predictive function, and in projecting emotions into the future.

CJ Lim is the Professor of Architecture and Urbanism at The Bartlett UCL, and served as Vice-Dean and Pro-Provost of University College London. His area of expertise is in sustainable urban planning, architecture and landscape, focusing on interpretations of social, cultural and environmental programmes. He is also the founding director of Studio 8 Architects in UK – a multi-disciplinary and international award-winning practice. His area of expertise is in sustainable urban planning, architecture and landscape, focusing on interpretations of social, cultural and environmental programmes. He is the recipient of the Royal Academy of Arts London ‘Grand Architecture Prize’.

 

CASE Open Lecture: Dr Susan Parham, University of Hertfordshire

The upcoming CASE Open Lecture will be given by Dr Susan Parham, Head of Urbanism and Planning at the University of Hertfordshire on Tuesday 16th October at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Her talk entitled, ‘Just what is ‘sustainable urbanism’ when it comes to food?’ will explore some of the ways cities and food are intertwined – drawing on urbanism research from the historical and contemporary city and its peri-urban edges, and will consider food’s sustainability as a highly contested area today in relation to what foodspace ‘works best’. Drawing on her own (and others’) applied research in the UK and elsewhere, Susan will consider some current design and planning focused urban foodscape and systems proposals for food-centred placemaking and retrofitting. Susan will argue the proposition that these approaches might contribute to responding to sharpening sustainability imperatives now and into the future.

Dr Susan Parham is Head of Urbanism and Planning at the University of Hertfordshire and Academic Director of the International Garden Cities Institute (IGCI). She researches and teaches on placemaking including food and urban design, planned settlements, sustainable materials, and masterplanning and retrofitting. Susan’s most recent book is Food and Urbanism (Bloomsbury, 2015) and her latest book chapters are in The Routledge Handbook of Landscape and Food (2018), Agrourbanism (2018) and in Future Directions for the European Shrinking City (RTPI Library Series, 2016). Susan is a member of the Royal Society for the Arts and the Royal Town Planning Institute.