KASA Open Lecture: Jamie Fobert

The first KASA Open Lecture of 2020 will be given by Architect and designer, Jamie Fobert with his talk titled, ‘Art and Architecture’ on Tuesday 4th February at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Since he established Jamie Fobert Architects in 1996, Jamie has consistently produced innovative and inspiring architecture in projects ranging from individual houses to high quality retail and significant public buildings for the arts. The practice has won a number of major public commissions for galleries including Tate St Ives in Cornwall and Kettle’s Yard in Cambridge and the present major development of the National Portrait Gallery in London.

Jamie Fobert Architects has grown into a substantial architectural practice with an outstanding reputation and has garnered several awards including the RIBA and English Heritage ‘Award for a building in an historic context’ and the Manser Medal. Tate St Ives was awarded the Art Fund’s Museum of the Year and shortlisted for the RIBA Stirling Prize 2018. In 2019, Jamie Fobert Architects was chosen as ‘BD Architect of the Year’ in recognition of the practice’s work on public buildings. Jamie was appointed CBE in the Queen’s New Years Honours in 2020.

Jamie has developed a very careful language of form and materiality that responds with great specificity to every project and its place. He makes architecture that is built with and around light, driven by functionality, ease of use, and the sociability that architecture can foster. Through intense and careful consideration of these issues, he is able to arrive at an architecture of practicality and beauty.

All welcome!

CREAte Open Lecture: John Goodall, Country Life

The next CREAte Open Lecture of the academic year will be given by John Goodall, Architectural Editor of Country Life, with his talk titled, ‘Under a spell: Gothic 1500 – 1700’. The lecture will take place on Tuesday 21 January at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

It is often supposed that the course of 16th century England abandoned its medieval traditions of architecture. In fact, medieval buildings continued to be admired and to shape English architecture. This lecture will explore some of the ways in which medieval architecture was preserved, imitated and understood prior to the Gothic revival in the 19th century.

All welcome!

CASE Open Lecture: Kristen Guida, London Climate Change Partnership

The upcoming CASE (Centre for Architecture and the Sustainable Environment) Open Lecture will be given by Kristen Guida, manager at London Climate Change Partnership with her talk titled, ‘From Science to Policy – adapting London to climate change’ on Tuesday 28 January at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Adapting to climate change requires good evidence-based policy and interventions. That means making strong links between science policymakers, and practitioners across different sectors. The London Climate Change Partnership exists to facilitate those links and ensure that those responsible for making the city climate resilient have the best evidence at their disposal and the capacity to use it.

Kristen has been working for nearly fifteen years on climate change adaptation, currently as manager of the London Climate Change Partnership, and previously as director of Climate South East and Chair of Climate UK. Her major interest is in convening partners from across sectors and helping them work together to respond to the social and environmental challenges presented by climate change. In particular, she is interested in the social justice issues raised by climate change and the need to incorporate equity in adaptive planning. In her previous life, she worked on human rights, as a Senior Researcher on political rights, civil liberties and press freedom at Freedom House in New York.

All welcome!

Digital Architecture Open Lecture: Mike Oades, Atomik Architecture

The next DARC (Digital Architecture Research Centre) Open Lecture will be given by Mike Oades, Director of Atomik Architecture, with his talk titled, ‘Hard balls in soft socks / soft balls in stiff socks!’ on Tuesday 12 November at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

The ambiguous title of the lecture refers to a conversation with the architect Kathryn Findlay one afternoon at the Ushida Findlay studio in London. She was, of course, describing a set of rules for engaging with organic architecture. The lecture will be a candid trajectory around expressionist architecture, a personal orbit that has glanced off both analogue and digital worlds. The talk will be illustrated by a series of key projects along Mike’s career – built, unbuilt and demolished.

Mike is a Director at Atomik Architecture – a design practice with studios in London and Almaty.Growing up in his parents’ holiday camp on the Lincolnshire coast, he developed a strong affinity for the temporary and the nostalgic, and narratives of time and legacy have run through his work ever since. Mike’s ability to take a lateral view has since become a fundamental part of Atomik’s ethos, with the varying geographies of the team regularly exploited to get a broader perspective on architectural ideas.

All welcome!

Image credit: Doha Villa by Ushida Findlay

CREAte Open Lecture: Richard Reid

The first CREAte open lecture of the academic year will be given by Richard Reid with his talk titled, ‘Dancing Through the Veil: the Ruskinian Concept of Savageness or Changefulness’ on Tuesday 29th October at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

The relevance of Ruskin’s The Nature of Gothic, with his six moral elements of architecture, is as great today as it ever was – savageness or rudeness and changefulness or variety are the most interesting to the modern architect. Richard Reid will explain why.

Richard Reid is the award-winning architect of Epping Forest council offices, one of Britain’s greatest postmodern buildings. He is the founder of Richard Reid and Associates, based in Sevenoaks with a studio in Guangzhou, China, and is best known for their work on the development at Lower Mill Estate, competition winning projects for Kleinzschocher, Leipzig, the Bertalia-Lazzaretto District, Bologna, and the masterplan, in collaboration with Max Lyons of Lyons+Sleeman+Hoare, for the Garden City of Greenville for the Urban Village Group. They also prepared the masterplan for Nansha Bay. While working on this scheme, they were also awarded the prize for the best small house in The Sunday Times British Homes Awards 2012. The practice are also specialists in regeneration and mixed use housing developments where place making is the key, as seen in their work in Leipzig, Germany, Nansha, China and in the UK at Thurrock and Ashford.

All welcome!

Sir Terry Farrell to give ‘Open Thinking’ lecture at University of Kent

Sir Terry Farrell will be giving a talk titled, ‘From China to Kent Towns and Villages’ on Friday 25th October at 6pm in Templeman Lecture Theatre as part of the University of Kent’s new ‘Open Thinking’ lecture series. This event is being jointly organised by The Canterbury Society, The University’s Faculty of Social Sciences and Kent School of Architecture and Planning.

Sir Terry Farrell, CBE, is considered to be the UK’s leading architect planner, with offices in London, Hong Kong and Shanghai. During almost 60 years in practice he has completed many award-winning buildings and masterplans including Embankment Place and The Home Office Headquarters building in London, as well as millennium projects such as The Deep in Hull and the Centre for Life in Newcastle. He designed the current Charing Cross Station as well as the MI6 Building in London, an exuberant work of postmodernism. Current projects in Kent include Otterpool Park, the proposed new Garden Town on the former Folkestone Racecourse site, and the UKC campus Masterplan.

The event will be preceded by a master class with Sir Terry, Kent School of Architecture and Planning’s MA Architecture and Urban Design and MArch students, and a group of architecture students from Lille led by Gilles Maury.

CASE Open Lecture: Professor Rohinton Emmanuel

The first CASE Open Lecture of the year will be given by Professor Rohinton Emmanuel, with his talk titled, ‘Architectural education in a time of climate emergency: thoughts on key challenges and future directions’ on Tuesday 15 October at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

We live in a rapidly warming world with limited time for corrective action. The contribution of built environment to the problem of climate change is considerable but many of the low-hanging fruits of actions to mitigate it are also found within the built environment, especially in cities.Based on my own world view of higher education in the 21st Century I propose to explore the key challenges facing university education at present and enumerate the architectural educational responses needed urgently to address the climate emergency. We will explore a set of initial ideas to transform architectural education to be fit-for-purpose to face this challenge and put forward ideas to move forward to a climate-sensitive design future.

Rohinton Emmanuel is Professor of Sustainable Design and Construction and Director, Research Centre for Built Environment Asset Management (BEAM) at Glasgow Caledonian University. He pioneered the inquiry of urban heat island studies in warm regions and has taught and consulted on climate and environment sensitive design, building and urban sustainability and its assessment, building energy efficiency, thermal comfort and carbon in the built environment. Rohinton was the Secretary of the largest group of urban climate researchers, the International Association for Urban Climate (2010-2013) and was a member of the Expert Team on Urban and Building Climatology (ET 4.4) of the World Meteorological Organization (WMO) as well as the CIB Working Group (W108) on “Buildings and Climate Change.” He has also worked as a green building consultant (LEED certification) and has authored over 150 research publications, including An Urban Approach to Climate Sensitive Design (E&FN Spon Press, 2005), Carbon Management in the Built Environment (Routledge, 2012), Critical Concepts in Built Environment: Sustainable Buildings (Routledge, 2014) and Urban Climate Challenges in the Tropics (Imperial College Press, 2016).

He is currently the Coordinator of an Erasmus Mundus Joint Master’s Degree Programme on urban climate and sustainability, MUrCS, as well as a Co-Investigator of a H2020 Project (OPERANDUM) on nature-based solutions to mitigate hydro-meteorological risks.

First DARC Open Lecture of the year: Pablo Zamorano, Heatherwick Studio

Digital Architecture Research Centre (DARC) are pleased to announce their first open lecture of the year will be given by Pablo Zamorano from Heatherwick Studio on Tuesday 1st October at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Pablo Zamorano is Head of Geometry and Computational Design at Heatherwick Studio. As head of the studio’s specialist modelling group, Pablo works across all studio projects providing expertise and guidance on new technologies and techniques, and the execution of challenging geometries. He has been instrumental on award-winning projects such as Coal Drops Yard. Prior to joining Heatherwick Pablo was based at SOM London. Pablo has lectured widely, and his personal work has been published and awarded internationally.

Translating complex geometry for real-world fabrication

The lecture will feature the work of Heatherwick Studio. Showcasing the processes behind their world-renowned designs, explore how the studio is engaging with emergent technologies and utilising Rhino and Grasshopper in the realisation of recently completed projects including New York’s Vessel, as well as their current explorations of mixed-reality in construction, to enable collaboration with local craftsman, ensure quality throughout the build process and allow designs to be pushed to their limits.

All welcome!

First KASA Open Lecture of the year: CJ Lim

Kent School of Architecture and Planning are pleased to announce the first Open Lecture of the academic year will be given by CJ Lim, titled, ‘Smartcities, Resilient Landscapes and Eco-Warriors’ on Tuesday 24th September at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

The book represents a crucial voice in the discourse of climate change and the potential opportunities to improve the ecological function of existing habitats or create new landscapes which are considered beneficial to local ecology and resilience. The notion of the Smartcity is developed through a series of international case studies, some commissioned by government organisations, others speculative and polemic. Following on from the success of the first edition ‘Smartcities + Eco-Warriors’ (2010), this second edition has nine new case studies, and additional ecological sustainability studies covering sensitivity, design criteria, and assessments for ecological construction plans. The book concludes with two new essays on the romance of trees and the empowering nature of resilient landscape.

CJ Lim is the Professor of Architecture and Urbanism at The Bartlett UCL, and director of Studio 8 Architects. His research is in urban design/planning and architecture, focusing on issues of resilience, sustainability and the challenges posed through climate change, population growth, socio-economics, and the reciprocal benefits of simultaneously addressing the threat and the shaping of cities. CJ has authored 10 books including ‘Virtually Venice’ (2006), ‘Short Stories – London in two-and-a-half dimensions’ (2011), ‘Food City’ (2014) and ‘Inhabitable Infrastructures: Science fiction or urban future?’ (2017).

All welcome!

Upcoming Digital Architecture Open Lecture: Christopher Leung, The Bartlett School of Architecture

The next Digital Architecture open lecture will be given by Dr Christopher Leung from The Bartlett School of Architecture with his talk titled, ‘Digital fabrication: Dialogue through manufacturing processes’ on Tuesday 12 February at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Architects have become accustomed to designing the physical fabric of buildings using digital tools. However, in an age of advanced manufacturing where there are possibilities enabled by the adoption of robotics and automation that are now widely available to architectural practice, architects are increasingly designing processes as much as components and assemblies. In this shift, architects can have a role to “Design for” aspects of these processes, where a given process can be for “Assembly”, “Disassembly” or “Measurement” to name a few.

Reflecting on the “Design for” considerations found in other industries such as automotive and aerospace, this lecture surveys a selection of the possibilities now afforded by digital fabrication and considers the implication for design options at the interface between digital representation and processes of making. These are presented through a series of case-study projects that have been carried out in collaboration with other educators, researchers and industry practitioners as well as current work at the Bartlett.

Christopher Leung trained as an architect at the Bartlett with experience in architectural and environmental design practice. He completed his engineering doctorate at UCL on passive variable performance facades. He is the programme director of the Masters in Design for Manufacture at UCL Here East, the new centre dedicated to making based at Stratford in east London.

He has worked on government-funded research projects into low-energy building technology, proof-of-concept build projects and post-doc research on the environmental evaluation of bio-receptive concrete. He has taught at the Bartlett in the Interactive Architecture Lab, BiotA Lab and the M.Sc in Architectural computation. He also carries out research into solar activated materials including bi-metals and shape memory alloys for novel applications in the facades of buildings to improve energy performance in collaboration with leading industry partners.

All welcome!