Author: eg291

dalby_square_margate

Climate change adaptation and intergeneration living in a heritage townhouse in Margate

CASE, alongside Thanet Council and the School of Psychology, have been working on the Dalby Square project in Margate.

The project aims to tackle climate change, an ageing population and housing shortages. The refurbishment of the heritage townhouse in Dalby Square, Margate, has now been completed and Kent County Council are seeking the tenants. The three-generation family will be part of the innovative project, where extensive monitoring will take place, to evaluate the climate change adaptation strategies, focusing on overheating, thermal comfort and energy performance, while testing the concept of multi-generation living. The team was interviewed for the BBC news for the south-east last autumn.

At the end of the project, a ‘Sustainable Heritage Toolkit’ will be published to help other coastal towns across the UK.

Further information about the project can be found here and for more information about applying for the scheme, please contact Oakwood Homes on 01843 221133.

 

Architectural photography

Passages – Architectural Photography exhibition

On Thursday, 14th June, Kent School of Architecture Architectural Visualisation masters students will be opening an exhibition of their photographic work.  Passages showcases (and celebrates) a selection of the best work from the MA Architectural Visualisation module, AR846: Architectural Photography.

This work will be displayed for the duration of the summer in the Keynes Atrium.  The exhibition will have a small opening reception today at 5pm, everyone is welcome.

MArch Unit 5 exhibition at York’s Festival of Ideas

MArch Unit 5 students will be presenting their innovative visions for the city of York at the York Festival of Ideas. The brief given for the exhibition was to; Design for Galactic Life on Earth: How can architectural intervention be used to initiate change? Each student has come up with their own proposal and these can be found on the York Festival of Ideas website.

There will also be talks from speakers including;

  • Alison Brooks, Alison Brooks Architects
  • Clare Wright, Wright & Wright Architects
  • Bob Allies, Allies and Morrison
  • Timothy Ireland , Kent School of Architecture
  • Sir Malcolm Grant, University of York

The festival is taking place on Sunday 17th June from 12pm to 6pm, admission is free and there is no need to book in advance.

The image below forms part of Stephanie Elward’s scheme – Reading Rooms for Rowntree’s Library for Precious Books.

Timothy Brittain-Catlin at the London Festival of Architecture

As part of this year’s London Architecture Festival, Timothy Brittain-Catlin will join a panel discussion entitled ‘Where do Houses Live’ on identity in housing organised by award-winning architects Proctor & Matthews. The discussion takes place on Wednesday 13th June at an exhibition of projects by the practice that will be open from 11th-15th June at 184-192 Bermondsey Street, London SE1 3TQ, a short walk from London Bridge Station. KSA students and staff are warmly invited to visit the exhibition, which will be open from 10.00-17.00 all through the week.

In addition to Stephen Proctor and Andrew Matthews, the participants in the discussion are Louise Wyman, Head of Strategy, Homes England, and Susie Stirling, Head of Placemaking and Housing, The Scottish Government. Further details including information on booking for the discussion can be found at https://www.proctorandmatthews.com/news/lfa-2018-where-do-houses-live.

Proctor & Matthews, one of the most highly regarded architectural practices designing housing in Britain, have been friends and supporters of KSA for many years and have offered post-Part 1 and 2 experience to several of our graduates.

Also as part of the Festival, Dr Brittain-Catlin, the publications chairman of the Twentieth Century Society, will on Thursday 14th June join the launch of the latest book in the Society’s series of monographs on British architects: Arup Associates, by Kenneth Powell.

Dr Nikolaos Karydis: Lecture on the Construction of Gothic Cathedrals

On Tuesday 27 March, Dr Karydis will give a talk about the construction, mechanics, and science of Gothic cathedrals. This talk will take place at Canterbury Cathedral and is conceived as a focused introduction, and source of inspiration, for historians, literary scholars, art historians and beyond working broadly on the middle ages and early modern period in Europe (including the British Isles). This talk has been commissioned by Birkbeck, University of London and forms part of a CHASE training programme entitled ‘Network: The Matter of the Archive before 1700’.

Image: Study of Gothic Vaulting, Nikolaos Karydis, 2006.

MAUD Paris field trip

MA Architecture and Urban Design students take on Paris

During this term, MA Architecture and Urban Design (MAUD) students will be studying the role that the natural landscape plays as the primary infrastructure of our cities, and of Paris in particular. The field trip to Paris was intended as an initial step in discovering the underlying landscape of central Paris by walking the places and spaces where aspects of the ‘lost’ landscape are still apparent. Over the three day trip, students visited the office of a well-respected Paris architect and went on walking tours, which contextualise what the students learn in their theory and history of urbanism lectures.

The study tour started with a visit to the site of the spring term Design Module AR84. The site is set within the valley of the Bièvre river (a ‘lost’ tributary of the Seine within the 5th and 13th arrondissements in south-east of Paris), where the students are expected to design new urban interventions within this historic city and respond appropriately to both the historic riverine landscape as well as to the present-day urban context.

The second day included a visit to the office of a prominent architectural practice called ‘Arte-Charpentier’, followed by an extensive walking tour of the ‘Les Passages Couverts’ from Rue Monmartre to the Palais Royale – a link series of traffic-free arcades and a remarkable medieval legacy that escaped the massive urban renewal program by Haussmann in the 19th century. The tour included visits to the Place Des Victoires and the Palais Royale, both innovative examples of 17th century city planning, followed by a visit to the courtyard of the 18th century Louvre to see the Grande Axe (the 19th century 5km axis of architectural monuments which runs from the Louvre to La Defense in the east) and the glass pyramid by I.M. Pei which opened in 1989. The day concluded with a walking tour of Île de la Cité and the Île Saint-Louis, two natural islands in the River Seine and the spiritual and historical centre of Paris, followed by a visit to the Centre Pompidou.

On the final day of the field trip, the group split into separate visits to the Eiffel Tower, La Defense and Ruisseau du Bac / St Deni, assembling once again to visit the exhibition at the Pavilion D’Arsenal, the Paris Centre for Architecture and Urban Planning located in the 4th arrondissement.

Student comments;

“The walking tour of the path of the old Bièvre river in Paris, was both informative for our project this semester and also a good way for us to be connected with the project.”

“We walked through the streets of Paris to see how the former rivers and tributaries shaped not only the streets of Paris but also the surrounding neighbourhoods. The information we were able to learn over the past few days will only add an invaluable layer of richness to our project.”

Erlend C. L. Birkeland Student Profile

 

 

 

 

 

Full name: Erlend C. L. Birkeland
Degree subject and level: Architecture BA, undergraduate stage 1
Home country/Nationality: Norway/Norwegian

1. Can you give us a bit of background to why you chose a UK qualification (E.g. national/global reach, career prospects, skills and experience gained…)
I chose to study in the UK partly because I wanted an education that was a bit different from the Norwegian architectural courses. In that way, I am hoping to bring some other perspectives and views on the subject when I begin practising as an architect in Norway.

2. What do you find most inspiring about your degree and institution?
The most inspiring thing about my degree is the fact that we get time and space to test different ideas and develop ourselves whilst learning a lot about a wide range of topics. That is the fantastic thing about architecture: when learning it, you can’t simply learn how a wall should be built or why structures don’t fall down. You have to learn a bit about history, psychology, sociology, art, composition, physics – and at Kent School of Architecture and I feel we get the opportunity to do that.

3. How did your perception of your subject change as a result of your course and studies? (E.g. What did you think of ‘design’ before and what do you think now?)
Before I began at Kent, I thought architecture was quite a bit more technical and full of memorising details than what it actually is. Yes, you have to understand quite a bit about how a building stands up, but you will learn that naturally as the course proceeds. The hard bit is to come up with the design you like.

4. What advice would you give students hoping to apply to your degree/course?
If you choose architecture, you have to be really interested in it. This isn’t a subject you study at the university a bit each day before you go home and have the rest of the evening off. The design process will be your life, so put some effort into learning good and effective time management.

5. Is there a memory of a trip, a workshop, a course or a speech that you attended that really stands out in your memory? Why?
In December, after all the work for the first semester has been finished, the year 1 students at Kent go to Barcelona to sketch and have a great time off and become even better friends. Working in the studio is the way we mostly make friends on this course, which is fantastic. Then after all the hard work at the end of our final project, we go into the beautiful city of Barcelona together with the enthusiastic teachers and that binds us together even more. It’s a wonderful dynamic.

6. What are your ambitions for the future?
I want to become an architect developing public buildings and public spaces for others to enjoy. To create spaces where people can meet each other and create memorable moments is what I really want to do.

fete des lumieres

MAAV Students head to the Fete des Lumieres in Lyon

MA Architectural Visualisation (MAAV) students returned to Lyon following the successful inaugural trip in 2016. The study tour to Lyon specifically complements two modules; AR822 Virtual Cities and AR846 Architectural Photography. The schedule was designed to take advantage of the rich architecture during the daytime, whilst allowing students to explore the illuminations during the night.

The Lumières festival was varied this year, and differed in style and range from the previous year. Highlights of the festival included an animation focused on the history of film and cinema in the Place des Terreaux, many of the references to which, the students could understand from their work in AR821 Film & Architecture.

This year, the trip to Lyon was incredibly important, providing an opportunity for the students to see first-hand the ways in which buildings can be animated through projection mapping. The research was directly fed into their own projection work for AR822 Virtual Cities at the recent Cheriton Light Festival in February. This module allows the students to bridge the boundaries between architectures; the actual and the virtual. The quality of their work was, without doubt, aided by the visit to France.

MAAV student feedback;
“The Lyon trip was a great experience! It developed my technique of finding interesting photographic subjects. As we toured the sites, we came across a lot of buildings that would perhaps be deemed unattractive, but their geometry made for some of the best photographs. It definitely helped me redefine my photographic eye. The Light show was incredibly inspiring and I have not experienced anything like it; I was so inspired by our trip, I am making efforts to recreate something for my local community, whom many may not be able to get the opportunity to experience what I had”
“…A very positive and useful trip toward my technical knowledge in projection mapping, where we had the chance to see real projects which were produced by known professional artists and companies. That experience helped me a lot to know what the real impact of projection mapping on people is, what works well and what is not”
“…This trip helped me a lot to strengthen my relationship with my colleagues, it’s made me feel like I have real friends on my course, which I need as an international student…”

KSA students win AIA UK Student Charrette 2017

The Kent School of Architecture are delighted to announce that the 8 person KSA team consisting of Andra-Lilian Oprea, Andrew Caws, Anna Reeves, Colleen Laurent, Elliot Bennett, Kyle McGuinness, Shefield NG and Zhi Bin Cheah has won this year’s American Institute of Architects Student Design Charrette held at the Roca Gallery in London, seeing off strong challenges from contemporaries at UCA, Ravensbourne, Oxford Brookes, Robert Gordon, Portsmouth and Westminster universities.

The AIA’s now well-established charrette is an opportunity for UK design students to collaborate and compete in teams being mentored by practising architects over the course of a suitably intense (but fun) day of creativity. This year’s brief, set in the Chelsea Harbour area and environs surrounding the Roca Gallery, invited architectural and urban speculations based around the idea of food or beverage production, consumption and distribution of a chosen, or invented, product drawing inspiration from this area of London being the home of the Chelsea bun.

The judges were won-over by the students’ inspired proposal for converting the site’s old power station into a speciality bread-making factory re-establishing a sense of place with a production, distribution and consumption cycle based on the local tide. This was further enhanced by reusing the chimneys to infuse the neighbourhood with the smell of freshly baking breads(!) giving a much needed sense of identity, and more wholesome character, to the this area’s ongoing mix of bland or blingy redevelopment.

Special thanks due to the unwavering encouragement of our mentor Bea Sennewald throughout the day, along with excellent AIA organisation and generous support from Roca and Laufen for hosting.

Feature image by Braima-Edusei Owusu-Nyantekyi. For further information, please refer to the AIA blog and photo gallery. 

Jef Smith – Stage 3 lecturer