Dr Peter Buš presents paper at eCAADe 2020

Dr Peter Buš, Lecturer in Digital Architecture presents his paper titled, ‘User-driven Configurable Architectural Assemblies: Towards artificial intelligence-embedded responsive environments‘ at the Education and Research in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe (eCAADe) conference taking place on the 16th and 17th September.

The paper theoretically elaborates the idea of individual users’ customisation activities to create and configure responsive spatial scenarios by means of reconfigurable interactive adaptive assemblies. It reflects Gordon Pask’s concept of human and device interaction based on its unpredictable notion speculating a potential to be enhanced by artificial intelligence learning approach of an assembly linked with human activator’s participative inputs. Such a link of artificial intelligence, human agency and interactive assembly capable to generate its own spatial configurations by itself and users’ stimuli may lead to a new understanding of humans’ role in the creation of spatial scenarios. The occupants take the prime role in the evolution of spatial conditions in this respect.

The paper aims to position an interaction between the human agents and artificial devices as a participatory and responsive design act to facilitate creative potential of participants as unique individuals without pre-specified or pre-programmed goal set by the designer. Such an approach will pave a way towards true autonomy of responsive built environments, determined by an individual human agent and behaviour of the spatial assemblies to create authentic responsive built forms in a digital and physical space.

Digital Architecture Open Lecture: Dr Dietmar Köring

We are pleased to announce that the first Digital Architecture Research Centre (DARC) Open Lecture of the academic year will be given by Dr Dietmar Köring with his lecture titled, ‘Computational design, digital participation and deterritorialisation’ on Tuesday 6 October at 6pm BST. Due to Covid-19 pandemic, all open lectures will be held online via Microsoft Teams, details to follow shortly.

Dietmar Köring is an architect, researcher, and educator living in Cologne.  He is  is head of the architectural research office Arphenotype, where he focuses on blurring the boundaries of different artistic disciplines. Dietmar was a research fellow at TU Berlin / CHORA City & Energy from 2012 to 2017 and has taught Digital Design at TU Braunschweig from 2010 to 2012, he was Guest Professor for Virtual Realities & Experimental Architecture at the University Innsbruck ./Studio3 in 2011, Technology and Design Lecturer at the Cologne Institute for Architectural Design / C-I-A-D and visiting lecturer for digital design at the DeMontfort University Leicester.  From 2011 to 2012 he was assistant professor for Smart City Concepts at the Technical University Cologne.

He studied architecture  at the University of Applied Sciences Cologne, the University of Western Sydney and  at the Muthesius Academy of Fine Arts, were he graduated as in 2005 as Dipl.-Ing. (FH). Dietmar received his MArch in 2007 at the Bartlett School of Architecture University College London and his Dr.-Ing. at the Technical University of Berlin in 2018.

Through his career he has worked internationally for offices such as Coop Himmelblau, Graft, 3deluxe and Andrew Wright Associates. His research has been awarded by the Jaap Bakema Fellowship / NAI and his works have been internationally published and exhibited. Dietmar has given international lectures, guest critiques and workshops.

Dr Dietmar Köring’s lecture will discuss algorithmic governmentality and how our co-existence with machines transpires.

Howard Griffin organises online conference as part of Architecture Media Politics Society

Howard Griffin, a member of the Centre for Research in European Architecture (CREAte) and the Digital Architecture Research Centre (DARC) has organised a conference called Connections: Exploring Heritage, Architecture, Cities, Art, Media and is part of the Architecture Media Politics Society (AMPS) research organisation’s series of major international conferences. AMPS sees the definition, debates and concerns of the built environment as intrinsic to those at the heart of other social, cultural and political discourses. Its focus is cross disciplinary and draws on the media, politics and the social sciences. It invites participation from all sectors: architects, planners, policy makers, artists, academics, the public and community activists. It functions as an open access platform for publication, a forum for debate through conferences and workshop, a conduit for book publications.

The conference, which will be hosted online on the 29 – 30 June 2020, notes that, particularly in recent months, the ‘digital’ is ubiquitous across all disciplines connected with life in cities: urban history, architecture, planning, art, design, media, communications, and more. As the tools we use today merge and blur across disciplines, this conferences asks educators and professionals to consider the following. How can we best manage, direct and utilise the unique potentialities of this interdisciplinary and technological moment? Are we rethinking objects of art and design from the past and future? Are we reconsidering modes of communication, styles of teaching and ways of living? Are we seeing new links between designed objects, visualised spaces and cultural meanings? Are we understanding creative, documentary and media practices in new ways? Are we developing our own knowledge through the technologies, tools or thinking of other disciplines?

A number of staff and students at the University of Kent will be presenting papers. Howard Griffin will be presenting about his virtual reality project, created with MA Architectural Visualisation students in his paper, The Future of the Past: Reconstructing St Augustine’s Abbey, Canterbury.  Head of School, Professor Gerald Adler will present his paper titled, ‘Script, Nondescript’, Professor Gordana Fontana Giusti will present her paper titled, ‘Designing Public Spaces to Empower Citizens: Reversing the Subject / Object Relation in Smart Cities’, and PhD student, Rafaella Siagkri will be presenting her paper titled, ‘Understanding and Preserving Cultural Heritage in Expressionist Architecture Using Virtual Reality.’

Dr Tim Ireland publishes new paper, ‘Bateson Information Revisited: A New Paradigm’

Director of Digital Architecture Research Centre (DARC), and programme director for MSc Bio Digital Architecture, Dr Tim Ireland has published a new paper titled, ‘Bateson Information Revisited: A New Paradigm‘. This paper is the latest in a line of papers written in collaboration with Dr Jaime Cardenas-Garcia, University of Maryland. This paper is product of a presentation by Dr Cardenas-Garcia at Conference Theoretical Information Studies (TIS), which took place in Berkeley, California in June 2019.

The goal of this work is to explain a novel information paradigm claiming that all information results from a process, intrinsic to living beings, of self-production; a sensory commensurable, self-referential feedback process immanent to Bateson’s difference that makes a difference. To highlight and illustrate this fundamental process, a simulation based on one-parameter feedback is presented. It simulates a homeorhetic process, innate to organisms, illustrating a self-referenced, autonomous system. The illustrated recursive process is sufficiently generic to be the only basis for information in nature: from the single cell, to multi-cellular organisms, to consideration of all types of natural and non-natural phenomena, including tools and artificial constructions.

IMAGE CREDIT: IS4SI 2019 SUMMIT

Dr Peter Buš publishes new article, ‘On-Site Participation for Proto-Architectural Assemblies’

Lecturer and member of Digital Architecture Research Centre (DARC), Dr Peter Buš, has recently written an article titled, ‘On-site participation for proto-architectural assemblies encompassing technology and human improvisation: “Fish Trap” and “Orchid” architectural interventions‘ which has been published in the special issue of Complexity. Complexity is a journal specialising in reporting ‘advances in the scientific study of complex systems’. Dr Buš’ article features in their special issue titled, ‘Tales of Two Societies: On the complexity of the coevolution between physical space and the cyber space’.

Dr Peter Buš writes, “This research investigates the notion of builders’ on-site engagement to physically build architectural interventions based on their demands, spatial requirements, and collaborative improvisation enhanced with the principles of uniqueness and bespoke solutions which are previously explored in computational models.

The paper compares and discusses two physical installations as proto-architectural assemblies testing two different designs and building approaches: the top-down predefined designers’ scenario contrary to bottom-up unpredictable improvisation. It encompasses a building strategy based on the discrete precut components assembled by builders themselves in situ.

The paper evaluates both strategies in a qualitative observation and comparison defining advantages and limitations of the top-down design strategy in comparison with the decentralised bottom-up building system built by the builders themselves. As such, it outlines the position of a designer within the bottom-up building processes on-site. The paper argues that improvisation and builders’ direct engagement on-site lead to solutions that better reflect human needs and low-tech building principles incorporated can deliver unpredictable but convenient spatial scenarios.”

Digital Architecture Open Lecture: Milad Showkatbakhsh

The next DARC (Digital Architecture Research Centre) will be given by Milad Showkatbakhsh with his talk titled, ‘Evolution as a Design Model’ on Tuesday 11 February at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Evolutionary Algorithms have been used extensively in recent years to mimic the principles of evolutionary science to solve common real-world problems through search and optimization procedures of single or multiple objectives. Ranging from the fields of economics to politics and music to architecture, evolutionary algorithms have proven to be an efficient problem-solving technique to find multiple trade-off solutions for problems that possess multiple design objectives that conflict with one another. Precedence for the application of an evolutionary model as a problem-solving strategy dates back to the early 20th century. It has since developed into a model that has been applied in a multitude of different fields to provide solutions to problems that required objectivity, optimality and efficiency. Within the design field, applications of biological evolutionary principles have been seen through the work of many architects/planners/designers throughout the second half of the 20th century (Batty, 2013; Coates, 2010; Weinstock, 2010; Marshall, 2008; Frazer, 1995; Steadman, 1979).

This lecture expands on the theory behind evolutionary computation, its foundation in biological evolution and its significance as a model in design. The lecture will culminate by presenting the application of evolutionary computation as a design methodology in a range of scales and complexities using Wallacei, a robust evolutionary multi objective optimisation engine.

Milad holds M.Arch. from Pratt Institute in New York, where he graduated with the Sidney Katz award for design excellence in 2015. He is currently a Doctoral candidate at the Architectural Association researching under the directorship of Dr. Michael Weinstock. Milad has worked for several architecture and design practices in Tehran, New York and Shanghai. Alongside practicing, he has been a fellow researcher in different computer-aided design research projects which were culminated as published papers in peer reviewed journals and conferences, posters and robotically fabricated installations. Milad has been actively teaching in academia in graduate and postgraduate courses and international architectural and computational workshops. Milad is currently teaching in the EmTech program at the AA and is also the co-director of the Istanbul branch of the AA Visiting School, where he is using his knowledge of evolutionary principles in the design and development of architectural projects that range in scale and function. Among many professional and academic activities, He is the Co-Founder and Co-Developer of ‘Wallacei,’ an evolutionary multi-objective optimisation engine with an embedded analytics engine that allows users to have full control over their optimisation problems in Grasshopper 3D. Milad’s current research focuses on the application of biological principles of evolution and morphogenesis into the design processes. For complex design problems, the priority should be given to how to formulate the question rather than finding an answer.

All welcome!

Invitation to MSc Bio Digital Architecture Google Hangout

Kent School of Architecture and Planning (KSAP) are pleased to announce we will be hosting a one-hour Google Hangout on Tuesday 3rd March for students interested in finding out about the latest addition to our postgraduate portfolio: MSc in Bio Digital Architecture. This course provides students with the skills and know-how to practice architecture at the cutting edge of digital design. The programme is designed to provide a theoretical basis of Computer-Aided Architectural Design as an academic discipline while simultaneously teaching the use of the computer for analysis of design problems and a tool for the generation of space and form.

Led by KSAP’s Director of Digital Architecture, Dr Tim Ireland, the course is primarily intended for graduates and professionals from a range of design backgrounds, including architecture, interior, graphic and urban design, who wish to develop computational techniques in architecture and gain the ability to use programming as easily as any other form of communication.

If you are interested in finding out more about the programme including course structure, entry requirements, career progression and more, please email ksapadmissions@kent.ac.uk to book your place on the MSc Bio Digital Architecture FREE online Google Hangout on Tuesday 3rd March from 11.00 – 12.00 GMT.

Digital Architecture Open Lecture: Fabrice Bourrelly

The first open lecture of 2020 will be hosted by the Kent School of Architecture and Planning’s Digital Architecture Research Centre (DARC), with Fabrice Bourrelly with his talk titled, ‘Unreal Engine: Real-time interactive design for Architecture’ taking place on Thursday 16th January 2020 at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

In this lecture, Fabrice will explain why the shift in gaming technology matters today. He will highlight how the technology is used throughout a wide spectrum of industries and more specifically in architecture and design. He will then demonstrate a live project to uncover the features and benefits of working in real-time.

Fabrice Bourrelly was originally introduced to the Unreal Engine community when he presented the Unreal Engine for Architecture webinar series in 2017, where he shared insights and tips based on his deep knowledge of Unreal Engine. Frabrice, a licensed architect since 1996, has worked as a freelance architectural visualisation designer over his entire career. From his London-based studio, he has worked for clients as diverse as Google, Bentley, Anish Kapoor, Thomas Heatherwick, and Zaha Hadid. Since 2017, he has been helping companies and individuals learn Unreal Engine, teaching online, and Unreal training centers and academy as well as creating and presenting UE4 demon content for Epic Games in the US, Europe and Asia.

Dr Peter Buš delivers public lecture and workshop at National United University in Taiwan

Dr Peter Buš, member of DARC Research Centre, was invited by Assistant Professor Shi-Yen Wu from the Department of Architecture at the National United University (NUU) in Taiwan to give a public lecture and a computational design workshop based on his previous collaborative activities with the NUU.

Dr Peter Buš’ lecture, ‘Transforming architecture in the age of digitisation of construction: participation, automation and evolving responsive concepts for the 21st Century’, conceptually outlined the idea of crowd-driven assemblies for flexible and adaptive constructions utilising automatic technologies in the context of twenty-first century cities.

The workshop, ‘Emergent proto-architectural formations: towards bio-integrated responsive architectural design, computational design workshop’ was attended by 60 students from National United University in Miao-Li and 13 students from the Shadong Jianzhu University in China. The workshop explored potentials and advantages of advanced computational design methods to rapidly generate spatial digital artefacts, ‘proto-architectures’, based on systematic and process-driven modelling techniques integrating the paradigm of emergence into computational models.

Dr Tim Ireland to speak at Bio-Computational Symposium at The Bartlett School of Architecture

Dr Tim Ireland, Director of Digital Architecture and Founder of KSAP’s Digital Architecture Research Centre (DARC), will be giving a talk titled, ‘Between Life and Architecture’ and the upcoming Bio-Computational Symposium on Wednesday 27 November at The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL. Organised by Claudia Pasquero, Emmanouil Zaroukas and Filippo Nassetti from the Urban Morphogenisis Lab, the symposium will discuss and reflect upon, ‘the link between human and non-human intelligences, architecture and urban design.’

Dr Tim Ireland’s presentation will claim a correlation between architectural theory and the biosemiotic project, and suggest how this coupling establishes a framework leading to an architectural-biosemiotic paradigm that puts biosemiotic theory at the heart of cognising the built environment, and offers an approach to understanding and shaping the built environment that supports and benefits human, and organismic, spatial intelligence.