Dr Peter Buš delivers public lecture and workshop at National United University in Taiwan

Dr Peter Buš, member of DARC Research Centre, was invited by Assistant Professor Shi-Yen Wu from the Department of Architecture at the National United University (NUU) in Taiwan to give a public lecture and a computational design workshop based on his previous collaborative activities with the NUU.

Dr Peter Buš’ lecture, ‘Transforming architecture in the age of digitisation of construction: participation, automation and evolving responsive concepts for the 21st Century’, conceptually outlined the idea of crowd-driven assemblies for flexible and adaptive constructions utilising automatic technologies in the context of twenty-first century cities.

The workshop, ‘Emergent proto-architectural formations: towards bio-integrated responsive architectural design, computational design workshop’ was attended by 60 students from National United University in Miao-Li and 13 students from the Shadong Jianzhu University in China. The workshop explored potentials and advantages of advanced computational design methods to rapidly generate spatial digital artefacts, ‘proto-architectures’, based on systematic and process-driven modelling techniques integrating the paradigm of emergence into computational models.

Dr Tim Ireland to speak at Bio-Computational Symposium at The Bartlett School of Architecture

Dr Tim Ireland, Director of Digital Architecture and Founder of KSAP’s Digital Architecture Research Centre (DARC), will be giving a talk titled, ‘Between Life and Architecture’ and the upcoming Bio-Computational Symposium on Wednesday 27 November at The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL. Organised by Claudia Pasquero, Emmanouil Zaroukas and Filippo Nassetti from the Urban Morphogenisis Lab, the symposium will discuss and reflect upon, ‘the link between human and non-human intelligences, architecture and urban design.’

Dr Tim Ireland’s presentation will claim a correlation between architectural theory and the biosemiotic project, and suggest how this coupling establishes a framework leading to an architectural-biosemiotic paradigm that puts biosemiotic theory at the heart of cognising the built environment, and offers an approach to understanding and shaping the built environment that supports and benefits human, and organismic, spatial intelligence.

Dr Peter Buš to give lecture at National United University in Miao-Li

Dr Peter Buš, Lecturer in Digital Architecture and member of DARC Research Centre, will be visiting Taiwan later this month to give a lecture at the National United University in Miao-Li. His lecture titled, ‘Transforming architecture in the age of digitisation of construction: participation, automation and evolving responsive concepts for the 21st Century’, conceptually outlines the idea of crowd-driven assemblies for flexible and adaptive constructions utilising automatic technologies in the context of twenty-first century cities.

The presentation will also look at the results from Peter’s Richard Rogers Fellowship residency in London conducted last Spring dedicated to large-scale urban prototyping for responsive cities. Peter argues that building technology needs to incorporate human inputs following the aspects of customisation to build adaptive architectural and urban scenarios based on immediate decisions made according to local conditions or specific spatial demands. The presentation will focus on large-scale automatic prototyping for built applications at the theoretical level along with interactions between humans and automatic building technologies.

Digital Architecture Open Lecture: Mike Oades, Atomik Architecture

The next DARC (Digital Architecture Research Centre) Open Lecture will be given by Mike Oades, Director of Atomik Architecture, with his talk titled, ‘Hard balls in soft socks / soft balls in stiff socks!’ on Tuesday 12 November at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

The ambiguous title of the lecture refers to a conversation with the architect Kathryn Findlay one afternoon at the Ushida Findlay studio in London. She was, of course, describing a set of rules for engaging with organic architecture. The lecture will be a candid trajectory around expressionist architecture, a personal orbit that has glanced off both analogue and digital worlds. The talk will be illustrated by a series of key projects along Mike’s career – built, unbuilt and demolished.

Mike is a Director at Atomik Architecture – a design practice with studios in London and Almaty.Growing up in his parents’ holiday camp on the Lincolnshire coast, he developed a strong affinity for the temporary and the nostalgic, and narratives of time and legacy have run through his work ever since. Mike’s ability to take a lateral view has since become a fundamental part of Atomik’s ethos, with the varying geographies of the team regularly exploited to get a broader perspective on architectural ideas.

All welcome!

Image credit: Doha Villa by Ushida Findlay

First DARC Open Lecture of the year: Pablo Zamorano, Heatherwick Studio

Digital Architecture Research Centre (DARC) are pleased to announce their first open lecture of the year will be given by Pablo Zamorano from Heatherwick Studio on Tuesday 1st October at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Pablo Zamorano is Head of Geometry and Computational Design at Heatherwick Studio. As head of the studio’s specialist modelling group, Pablo works across all studio projects providing expertise and guidance on new technologies and techniques, and the execution of challenging geometries. He has been instrumental on award-winning projects such as Coal Drops Yard. Prior to joining Heatherwick Pablo was based at SOM London. Pablo has lectured widely, and his personal work has been published and awarded internationally.

Translating complex geometry for real-world fabrication

The lecture will feature the work of Heatherwick Studio. Showcasing the processes behind their world-renowned designs, explore how the studio is engaging with emergent technologies and utilising Rhino and Grasshopper in the realisation of recently completed projects including New York’s Vessel, as well as their current explorations of mixed-reality in construction, to enable collaboration with local craftsman, ensure quality throughout the build process and allow designs to be pushed to their limits.

All welcome!

Dr Peter Buš to speak at the Automation and Robotics Show

Dr Peter Buš will be speaking at the Automation and Robotics Show in Milton Keynes Arena on 25th June. His talk titled, ‘Large-scale prototyping utilising technologies and participation’ will envisage large-scale cable-driven systems for urban automation and takes the inspiration of processes-driven approach for construction from the shipping port areas in waterfront cities.

There is an immense potential in a combination of off-site and on-site construction approaches, with process-driven off-site systems expanding their ‘essence’ towards on-site deployment, potentially leading to increased construction efficiency and productivity. In addition, there is a growth in customised solutions for the construction sector as well as container-based modular construction systems where non-traditional building methods will benefit from these with the support of digital technologies. In particular, the presentation theoretically focuses on large-scale automatic prototyping for build applications along with interactions between humans and automatic building technologies to create on-demand spatial scenarios supported by relevant computational design methods for scenarios generation.

Realising Frederick Kiesler’s Endless House

Frederick Kiesler’s Endless House is regarded as one of the most visionary projects in the history of 20th Century architecture. It was a project that spanned almost forty years, developed through sketches, drawings, plans and models between mid-1920’s to the 1960’s but it was never built. Walter Gropius, founder of the Bauhaus, considered it important to translate Kiesler’s architecture into reality.

Kent School of Architecture and Planning’s 3D CAD Technician, Julien Soosaipillai, built a digital model of the exterior shell from texts, drawings and photographs of Kiesler’s model for his unfinished Endless House project. This is the first step in DARC‘s current project to realise Frederick Kiesler’s ‘Endless House’.

Kent School of Architecture and Planning launch new Digital Architecture Research Centre

Kent School of Architecture and Planning (KSAP) are pleased to announce the launch of DARC (Digital Architecture Research Centre).

DARC is the newest research centre at Kent School of Architecture and Planning (KSAP) specialising in the application of digital technology in architecture. DARC will focus on the creative use of digital technologies to enhance design and fabrication possibilities for architecture and the built environment. The Centre has streams headed by its members:

  • Generative design and computational creativity
  • Digital fabrication and robotics
  • Digital visualisation and mixed reality.

The Centre is a new interdisciplinary direction for KSAP, founded on members’ expertise and international research profiles, it aims to promote an innovative interdisciplinary research environment exploring intersections between architecture and digital technologies.

If you’d like to find out more about DARC, and about the latest addition to KSAP’s postgraduate offering, MSc Bio Digital Architecture, email ksaadmissions@kent.ac.uk to join the free Google Hangout with Dr Tim Ireland, Director of Digital Architecture, on Wednesday 5 June at 14.00 BST.

Dr Tim Ireland to present recently published paper at 2019 Annual Gatherings in Biosemiotics

Dr Tim Ireland, Kent School of Architecture and Planning’s Director of Digital Architecture, will be presenting his recently published paper entitled, ‘The Fundamental Problem of the Science of Information‘, at the 2019 Annual Gatherings in Biosemiotics in Moscow in July.

The presentation, co-authored with Dr Jaime Cardenas-Garcia (University of Maryland) is entitled, A New Biosemiotics Paradigm: Bateson Information. Biosemiotics integrates theoretical biology with semiotics, a science on signification and meaning.

The concept of information has been extensively studied and written about, yet no consensus on a unified definition of information has to date been reached. The paper seeks to establish a unified definition of information and claims a biosemiotics perspective, based on Gregory Bateson’s definition of information, and provides a footing on which to build because the frame this provides has applicability to both the sciences and humanities.

A key issue in reaching a singular definition of information is the problem of identifying how a human organism develops from a state in which its knowledge of the human-organism-in-its-environment is almost non-existent, to a state in which the human organism not only recognises the existence of the environment but also sees itself as part of the human-organism-in-its-environment system. This allows a human organism not only to engage with the environment and navigate through it, but also to transform it in its own image and likeness. In other words, the Fundamental Problem of the Science of Information concerns the phylogenetic development process, as well as the ontogenetic development process of Homo sapiens, from a single cell to our current multicellular selves, all in a changing long-term and short-term environment, respectively.

Dr Peter Buš to present at eCAADe SIGraDi 2019

Dr Peter Buš will be presenting his recent paper titled, ‘Large-scale prototyping utilising technologies and participation: On-demand and crowd-driven urban scenarios’ at the next eCAADe SIGraDi 2019 taking place in Porto with the theme of ‘Architecture in the age of the 4th industrial revolution’.

Dr Buš’ paper theorises and elaborates the idea of crowd-driven assemblies for flexible and adaptive constructions utilising automatic technologies and participatory activities within the context of 21st century cities. As economic and technological movements and shifts in society and cultures are present and ongoing, the building technology needs to incorporate human inputs following the aspects of customisation to build adaptive architectural and urban scenarios based on immediate decisions made according to local conditions or specific spatial demands. In particular, the paper focuses on large-scale prototyping for urban applications along with on-site interactions between humans and automatic building technologies to create on-demand spatial scenarios.

It discusses the current precedents in research and practice and speculates future directions to be taken in creation, development or customisation of contemporary and future cities based on participatory and crowd-driven building activities. As such, the main aim of this theoretical overview is to offer a more comprehensive understanding of the relations between technology and humans in the context of reactive and responsive built environments.