CASE Dalby Square project featured on BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire Show

The Centre for Architecture and the Sustainable Environment’s (CASE) Dalby Square project was recently featured on the BBC’s Victoria Derbyshire programme. The Dalby Square project in Margate is a cross-sector collaboration between Kent County Council (KCC), Thanet District Council, Kent School of Architecture and Planning, the School of Psychology and the private sector. The aim was to develop and retrofit the KCC owned property at 12a Dalby Square into an exemplar residence that simultaneously addresses the challenges of climate change and promotes opportunities for inter-generational living, whilst also ensuring that the existing architectural details of the property are conserved and restored.

“The council wanted to address some of the issues with Dalby Square, and bring it back to its former glory, as part of the wider regeneration of Margate”, says Professor Marialena Nikolopoulou, CASE founder and director of the centre between 2011 and 2018. She also notes that, “If you have an extended family living together they they can afford the house, they’re in a better situation, while also looking after each other. Whether that’s grandparents looking after their grandchildren, or an extended network of siblings.”

CASE worked with architects Lee Evans Partnership to transform the five-story terraced townhouse from former subdivided hotel rooms into a home that enables several generations of the same family to live together under one roof, with both communal and private living areas.

The refurbishment of the heritage townhouse in Dalby Square, Margate, has been completed and a three-generation family are part of the innovative project, where extensive monitoring will take place, to evaluate the climate change adaptation strategies, whilst focusing on overheating, thermal comfort and energy performance, while testing the concept of multi-generation living. CASE aims to develop a ‘Sustainable Heritage Toolkit’ to help other coastal towns across the UK.

You can watch the episode on BBC iPlayer, with the feature on 12a Dalby Square starting at 47.31.

BBC reports on Dr Henrik Schoenefeldt’s research at Houses of Parliament

Dr Schoenefeldt’s current research project at the Houses of Parliament was featured on the BBC. It was subject of the special report ‘Political hot air’ on BBC South East Today, 18 April 2019, 6.30. Henrik took Robin Gibbons, BBC broadcast journalists, around the hidden voids of the Palace of Westminster and gave an interviews on his academic research. The project aims to provide a critical understanding of the design, history and performance of the 19th century ventilation system of the Houses of Parliament, and to explore the possibility of revitalising the currently disused system during the restoration of the Palace of Westminster. A brief summary of the project can be found on the parliamentary website here and it has also been the subject of a cover article in the CIBSE Journal.

 

Prof. Marialena Nikolopoulou discussing the refurbishment of Dalby Square on BBC SE Evening News

The Director of CASE, Prof. Marialena Nikolopoulou, appeared at the BBC South East evening news last night, discussing the refurbishment of the Dalby Square townhouse in Margate with a focus on future proofing against climate change and intergeneration living.  This is an innovative regeneration project that is proactively addressing the challenges of climate change, an ageing population and housing shortages by renovating and converting a Victorian property in Margate for multi-generational living.

The full feature including the interview with Prof Marialena Nikolopoulou, can be found on BBC iplayer from 10.49 to 14.01: http://www.bbc.co.uk/iplayer/episode/b097c3nz/south-east-today-evening-news-09102017

More information on the project can be found here: https://research.kent.ac.uk/case/climate-change-adaptation-and-intergeneration-living-in-a-heritage-townhouse-in-margate/

Timothy Brittain-Catlin speaks on BBC1’s The Big Questions

BBC television’s live discussion programme The Big Questions was broadcast live this Sunday from the Colyer-Fergusson building at the University of Kent. The third of the three debates in the programme centred on whether the Church of England should protect its historic buildings as congregations dwindle. This came in the wake of the recent announcement by the Archbishop of Canterbury that some buildings, such as Guildford Cathedral, were ‘not too big to fail’. In Guildford the diocese had recently been prevented by residents, councillors and planners from building an estate of new houses along the south flank of the well known cathedral, designed by Edqard Maufe in 1932. Timothy Brittain-Catlin spoke as the Deputy Chairman of the Twentieth Century Society, the national amenity organisation, and the author Sir Simon Jenkins, formerly Chairman of the National Trust for England and Wales and now a trustee of the Churches Conservation Trust, also participated. The programme is seen by around 1 million viewers.

The programme is available here on the BBC I-Player until 9 April and the discussion on church buildings starts at 42’20”.