Dr Luciano Cardellicchio receives mention at the 8th conference on Construction Research

Dr Luciano Cardellicchio presented the first results from his Leverhulme-funded research project ‘Our Future Heritage’ at the 8th International Conference on Construction Research organised by the prestigious Eduardo Torroja Institute in Madrid. The principal purpose of the institute is to carry on scientific research and technical development in the field of construction and construction materials.

The paper titled ‘Ageing pattern of Contemporary Concrete: the case study of the Jubilee Church by Richard Meier in Rome’ has received a mention from the conference jury, which included the editor of Casabella Professor Francesco Dal Co, award-winning Portuguese architect Eduardo Souto De Moura, and the Director of the Eduardo Torroja Foundation Pepa Cassinello.

CASE Dalby Square Project ‘highly commended’ at Kent Design and Development Awards

The Centre for Architecture and the Sustainable Environment’s Dalby Square project was shortlisted in three categories: Conservation, Residential Minor and Environmental  Performance in the Kent Design and Development Awards and won ‘highly commended’ in the Environmental Performance category. Focusing on key national priorities of climate change and aging population, the project evaluated exemplar climate change adaptation and retrofit strategies for heritage townhouses, while promoting opportunities for inter-generational living.

The Dalby Square project in Margate is a cross-sector collaboration between Kent County Council (KCC), Thanet District Council, CASE (Centre for Architecture and Sustainable Environment) at the University of Kent, the School of Psychology and the private sector. The aim was to develop and retrofit the KCC owned property at 12a Dalby Square into an exemplar residence that simultaneously addresses the challenges of climate change and promotes opportunities for inter-generational living, whilst also ensuring that the existing architectural details of the property are conserved and restored.

The refurbishment of the heritage townhouse in Dalby Square, Margate, has been completed and Kent County Council are looking for tenants. The three-generation family will be part of the innovative project, where extensive monitoring will take place, to evaluate the climate change adaptation strategies, whilst focusing on overheating, thermal comfort and energy performance, while testing the concept of multi-generation living. A ‘Sustainable Heritage Toolkit’ will be published to help other coastal towns across the UK.

Dr Timothy Brittain-Catlin joins the World Architecture Festival

Timothy Brittain-Catlin will be joining the world’s leading architects at the World Architecture Festival in Amsterdam at the end of November. The Festival’s super jury includes Sir David Adjaye and Nathalie de Vries, director and co-founder of MVRDV, and other participants include Simon Allford, Allison Brooks, Nigel Coates, Peter Cook, Deborah Saunt and many more from all over the world. Rem Koolhaas, Reinier de Graaf and Charles Jencks are among the speakers, and Catherine Croft, director of the Twentieth Century Society, and the editor and critic Catherine Slessor will also be participating.

Dr Brittain-Catlin will be part of a judging panel that includes Joyce Owens of Studio AJO and Torben Østergaard of the international Danish practice 3XN for the Future Projects category. The Festival runs from 28th to 30th November and will be held at the RAI Amsterdam convention centre.

The World Architecture Festival is the only global awards programme where architects present their completed buildings and future projects live to a panel of internationally renowned judges and delegates from around the world. This year there will be more award finalists to see, more presentations and prizes to be received, more delegates to network and more fringe activity than ever before.

Professor Gerald Adler published in Architecture Philosophy journal

‘Architecture is concealed unto itself: Helmuth Plessner and his influence on twentieth-century architecture’, written by Gerald Adler has just been published in the latest issue of the journal Architecture Philosophy. This is the journal of the International Society for the Philosophy of Architecture, and is a special issue devoted to papers presented at its major conference in 2016 at Bamberg University, Germany. The conference topic was ‘The Human in Architecture and Philosophy’ and Adler presented a paper on Plessner, one of the key philosophers of Weimar-era ‘Philosophical Anthropology’. He elucidates Plessner’s ‘place’-centred philosophy, and contrasts this with the time-centred thinking of his far more well-known peer Martin Heidegger. Adler presents the architectural implications of Plessner’s thinking, demonstrating this through the design of his own house (by Lucy Hillebrand), and by allusions to the pragmatic approach of the Viennese architect Josef Frank. The article will be of interest to those who wish to go beyond mere appearances to get to the philosophical underpinnings of design. It will also come as an antidote to those who recoil at ‘philosophy’ (and certainly the difficulties of Heidegger’s writing), and to those with an interest in the wider cultural and anthropological implications for architecture.

Guest-edited by the conference organisers, Martin Düchs and Christain Illies, the journal contains a number of interesting articles, including ones by keynote speakers Karsten Harries and the (recently topical) Roger Scruton.

KASA Open Lecture: Matthew Butcher, founder of P.E.A.R.

The last Kent School of Architecture open lecture of 2018 will be hosted by KASA (Kent Architectural Student Association), and will be given by Matthew Butcher, editor and founder of P.E.A.R. (Paper for Emerging Architectural Research) and Senior Lecturer in architecture at the Bartlett School of Architecture. The lecture, entitled, ‘Provocation and Performance’, will take place on Tuesday 27 November at 6PM in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Matthew Butcher is an academic, writer and designer. His work has been exhibited at the V&A Museum, London; Storefront for Art and Architecture, New York; The Architecture Foundation, London and the Prague Quadrennial, Prague. Recent projects and exhibitions include ‘2EmmaToc/Writtle Calling’ a temporary radio station in Essex,  ‘Flood House’ a floating architecture developed for Southend and ‘The Mansio’, a retreat for writers and poets, which was nominated for the 2017 Architects Journal Small Projects Prize. Matthew is also the editor and founder of the architectural newspaper P.E.A.R.: Paper for Emerging Architectural Research and Senior Lecturer in Architecture at the Bartlett School of Architecture; where he is also Director of the Undergraduate Architecture Programme.   He has contributed articles and papers for journals including Conditions, Architecture Research Quarterly (ARQ), the RIBA Journal and Architecture Today. He is also Guest Editor, along with Luke Pearson, for the upcoming special issue of AD titled Re-Imagining the Avant-Garde: revisiting the architecture of the 1960s and 1970s.

Matthew Butcher’s work, formed of designs, actions and events, operates as a provocation within particular social, cultural and political contexts associated with the inhabitation of suburban and rural environments.  This includes coastal sites in Essex affected by rising sea levels or the neglect of abandoned mines in the South West of England. Manifesting as built structures, events, drawings and scaled models, the work explores spaces and forms that are performative. That is to say, the material state of the architecture changes, or is perceived to change, in relationship to conditions such as the environments in which they are located, or through the actions of the people who inhabit them. Cross referencing his practice with the work of architects and artists working across the disciplines of art, architecture and performance in the 1970’s, Butcher will seek to ask whether we can, through the re-contextualization of historical models, re-enact an architectural Avant-Garde today? And he will question what the use of this mode of practice can mean to the future of the discipline?

KSA students design dystopian future as part of AIA Student Charrette 2018

The Kent School of Architecture entered this year’s AIA Student Charrette competition, held at the Roca Gallery in London. The team consisted of Edoardo Avellino, Ben Child, Ines Combalat, Kyle McGuinness, Jake Obichere and  Christine Wong from Stage 3, BA (Hons) Architecture.

The competition saw an array of participants from six universities and with the hope of continuing last year’s success as winners, a different challenge was posed. A daylong event, full of creativity, set the scene for a promising project. Set in Chelsea, at Lots Road Auction House, the brief for the day was split into two parts; i.e. to choose an object within the auction house, in order to describe its journey from the seller to the buyer, whilst imagining the process of the object in spatial and architectural form.

At the Lots Road Auction House, a member of staff gave a short talk about the type of items that are sold and the process of auctioning itself. Particular points stood out to us as we began searching for a concept. We were interested in how the bidding process had changed as technology and the world around had advanced, creating an auction house which worked mainly digitally now. This provoked us to speculate about the future of the auction house and how it may evolve as time goes on. Another interesting facet to the auction house is the bidding process itself and how people spend large amounts of money on items that they do not particularly want or need. This led us try to create a design that would match the drama of the bidding war in its architecture. These influences manifested in an imagined dystopian world where water is scarce and one of its few sources are sheets of ice, imported from the arctic, to be bid on in the Lots Road Auction House. This highlights how an item that is currently taken for granted should have much more value than we attribute to it and plays with the idea of exaggerating the tension within the auction house by bidding on a rare necessity.

In this scenario, we imagine that the Lots Road Auction House begins to sell ‘fresh, pure water from Arctic ice’ to its wealthy clientele, but as the conventional means of acquiring water becomes more restricted, demand increases for the Arctic-water. Due to this increased demand, the Lots Road Auction House moves in to the nearby power station and begins shipping in sheets of ice via the Thames. A shard of ice hangs between the two chimneys of the power station, slowly dripping in to a glass below it. The glass sits on a plinth in the centre of the power station, surrounded by hopeful bidders. Every time the ice drips in to the glass, a bid has to be made and when there is a drip with no bid, the most recent bidder lifts the glass from the plinth and drinks from it, replicating the hammer moment in the traditional auction house. As the bids are made, the new price is projected onto the side of the ice and the number of lights within the power station rise as the bid increases, elevating the tension of the process. From the outside, the city of London looks on as a level in the power station chimneys decreases, representing the ever-diminishing amounts of ice left in the Arctic. This in turn creates panic in the city, making its inhabitants flock to the power station to bid on water, once more increasing its value and adding to the intense nature of the bidding process. We portrayed this transformation of the Lots Road Auction House with various collages, models, sketches and drawings.

Overall, the judges were looking for a more conventional version of the auction house rather than the surreal proposal we developed. In the end, it was the students from the University of Westminster who succeeded to take this year’s title as winners of the AIA Student Charrette 2018. We learnt a lot during this CAD-free event, and it enabled us to be as creative as possible, learning how to respond to a brief through the methodologies of hand-drawing and model making.

We would like to congratulate the winning team and thank Amrita Raja, our mentor for the day, ROCA and Laufen for supporting yet another successful event.

By Jake Obichere and Ben Child
Stage 3, BA (Hons) Architecture

Steve Quartermain CBE to celebrate launch of MA Urban Planning and Resilience

To celebrate the launch of our new MA Urban Planning and Resilience course, Steve Quartermain CBE, the Chief Planner at the Ministry of Housing, Communities and Local Government, is coming to the University of Kent to meet with students on the new masters programme, and to talk about the latest developments in policies in planning.

Steve began his career as a trainee planner having studied geography at Durham University. He took a postgraduate qualification and subsequently became an RTPI member in 1982. His early career was mostly in Development Management in Epping Forest and Dartford, before he moved to Yorkshire to take on the role of Head of Development Control, and in 1988 he was made Head of Planning.

The event is open to all current students, and all who are interested in studying on the new MA Urban Planning and Resilience programme, and will take place on Wednesday 21 November from 10.00 – 11.30 in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1. If you have any queries about this event, or would like to find out more, please email architecture@kent.ac.uk.

Interested in studying MArch? Join our Google Hangout!

Kent School of Architecture are hosting an MArch Google Hangout with the MArch programme director, Michael Richards, on Tuesday 11th December at 12.00 – 13.00 GMT for all current and prospective applicants.

If you are interested in studying on the MArch programme for entry in September 2019, and would like to find out more information about the course structure, unit system, entry requirements and would like an opportunity to have your queries answered, then please email ksaadmissions@kent.ac.uk to book onto this event.

 

PhD Seminar Series: Maria Dimitriou

This week’s PhD Seminar Series will take place in the PGR Hub, Digital Crit Space on Wednesday 14 November from 16.00 – 17.30, given by Maria Dimitriou, a Kent School of Architecture PhD Candidate in Architectural Heritage and Conservation. Her talk, based on her research is titled, ‘Transformation of Industrial Heritage: The Case of Volos, Greece’.

De-industrialization poses a major challenge for the preservation of the heritage of industrial towns in Europe. Volos, an industrial harbour town in central Greece, provides a typical example of this phenomenon. Redundancy and decay of many of the city’s 20th-century industrial buildings threaten the survival of a significant aspect of the heritage of Volos. Infusing new life in these buildings requires the involvement of a wide range of stakeholders as well as the development of new management and conservation strategies. For this reason, the urgent contribution to the European discussion on preservation and future maintenance of such areas will require vital solutions that will save them from falling into ruin.

This dissertation applies an interdisciplinary approach that will seek to identify an innovative model for the strategic management and re-use of the industrial heritage of Volos. It provides new ways to understand preservation theory and management objectives for industrial heritage sites by analyzing existing mechanisms for their preservation through values and practices. In addition, this research identifies characteristics and values aimed at expanding the framework of historic industrial preservation practice. It argues that management strategies based on traditional preservation practices are insufficient for interpreting the complexity of these historic places, and that historical industrial preservation is best served by attending to the range of values and processes associated with the historic landscape and its protection.

 

CASE Open Lecture: Dr Maria Kikira, UK Green Building Council

The next CASE Open Lecture will be given by Dr Maria Kikira from UK Green Building Council, with her talk titled, ‘The role of UK Green Building Council in the built environment: Get involved, stay engaged!’. The lecture will take place on Tuesday 20th November at 6PM in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

The presentation will cover the five thematic areas of UKGBC such as: climate change, resource use, nature & biodiversity, health & wellbeing, socio-economic impact, and how they are related to the built environment. There will also be an introduction to our Net Zero, Circular Economy, Climate Resilience, Cities and Social Value programmes from the perspective of working towards a sustainable future.

Maria is an architect with a passion for sustainable development in the built environment. She works for UK Green Building Council with the Learning and Development team, aiming to increase awareness and inspire the building industry on issues ranging from climate change, resource efficiency to health and well-being. Maria has a PhD on façade performance evaluation in relation to the indoor environment and extensive experience on European research programmes in the field of sustainability.

All welcome!