Dr. David Haney is due to speak at Dumbarton Oaks’s Garden and Landscape Studies colloquium: “Travel and Translation”

Dumbarton Oaks is launching a series of translations of classic and rare texts on garden history and on the philosophy, art, and techniques of landscape architecture. The volumes will cover a broad geographical and temporal range, from ancient Chinese poetry to twentieth-century gardening treatises, and will eventually constitute a library of historical sources that have defined the core of the field. The first two volumes in this series will appear in the fall of 2013. One is a travel report by the German court gardener Hans Jancke, “An Apprenticeship in the Earl of Derby’s Kitchen Gardens and Greenhouses at Knowsley, England” (1874-75), the manuscript of which is owned by Dumbarton Oaks; the other is the translation of “Die Gartenkultur des 20. Jahrhunderts” (“Garden Culture of the 20th Century”) by the German designer Leberecht Migge, which will appear on the centenary of the book’s original publication in 1913.

As a way of launching this series, Dumbarton Oaks are planning a one day colloquium scheduled for November 1, 2013, on the subject of “Travel and Translation.” Its aim is is to explore the ways that landscape design ideas are transmitted and exchanged, sometimes through literal travel and translation, and sometimes through study, absorption, and interpretation.  Given that the first two titles in the translation series are German, the focus of the colloquium will be on Germany and Central Europe, with comparative talks on Italy, England, Ireland, and the United States.  Among the confirmed speakers is David Haney from the University of Kent, who translated Garden Culture and will speak on Migge’s response to English and American ideas about metropolitan park design.

David Haney’s translation of Leberecht Migge’s Garden Culture of the Twentieth Century has just been published by Dumbarton Oaks (Harvard Univ. Press). It features a lengthy scholarly introduction by Haney, discussing the importance of the German Werkbund to Migge’s project, as well as influences from abroad, including England.

Leberecht Migge (1881–1935) was one of the most innovative landscape architects of the early twentieth century. With work ranging from large urban parks to housing settlements with allotment gardens, he sought to create functional green spaces that would not only meet the environmental challenges of the industrial metropolis but also improve the social conditions of modern life. Migge’s notion of “garden culture” captured the essence of the progressive reform movements of early twentieth-century Germany and yet was unique in proposing a comprehensive role for open space planning within this vision. The nationalistic rhetoric of Garden Culture of the Twentieth Century marks it as a political tract of the late Kaiserreich, and its deep influence within the Siedlung communities of the Weimar era attests to its lasting cultural impact. Perhaps the book’s greatest significance today lies in Migge’s emphasis on the socioeconomic benefits of urban agriculture, which prefigured both this important contemporary trend as well as other recent developments in green technology and infrastructure. Modern readers will find echoes of a progressivism that many have taken to be of only recent origin and will gain a better understanding of the social and economic history of pre–World War I Germany.

For more information on the “Travel and Translation” series please visit the Dumbarton Oaks site.

Interiors students sign off with London Show

The final cohort of BA Interiors students signed off their studies collaborating together to take part in the Free Range Design show held at the Truman Gallery in London. With their work displayed alongside students from other interiors courses, the show was a highlight of a full calendar of summer events.

Examples of the students’ work can be see here: http://www.free-range.org.uk/cgi-bin/exhibition.pl?yearID=18&exhibitionID=1029.

Further information about the exhibition can be found here > http://www.free-range.org.uk/

Kent School of Architecture students win RIBA prizes

RIBA Prize Winners 2013

Congratulations to Matthew Downey and Emmanuel Owusu, students here at the Kent School of Architecture who have both received prizes for excellence from the Royal Institute of British Architects.

Matthew, 24, was the winner of the Diploma Prize at Kent and Emmanuel, 20, was the winner of the Degree Prize at Kent. They both received their prizes from Derek Nicholson, Chair of RIBA West Kent Branch at the School of Architecture’s recent End of Year Show. The Prizes are designed to celebrate the talent of architecture students at the University.

RIBA has stated that the judges were impressed with Matthew’s project, which was a design for Millennium Mills – a derelict 20th century flour mill in London’s Docklands. Matthew proposed a new building as a trade centre that would integrate a mixture of societies, combined with a centre for monitoring immigration. ‘By integrating different technical approaches adopted from a culture’s native way of life, such as their traditional construction methods and materials, the cultures can come together to represent a community.’

Matthew Downey's project

The judges were excited by Emmanuel’s project, which was a design for an extension to the Centre for Urban Culture in Lille. La Maison Du Hip-Hop aims to celebrate the rise of contemporary hip-hop in Lille and in France as a whole and is dedicated to the professional development of hip-hop artists. The project would rejuvenate an area that suffers from high unemployment and declining manufacturing industries. As Emmanuel says, ‘Inspired by the spontaneity of the street dance battle, the scheme aims to contribute to the great strides taken by Lille to be one of the foremost French and European cities’.

Emmanuel Owusu's project

Matthew has just completed his MArch Part 2 course towards qualifying as an architect at the University of Kent and Emmanuel has just graduated from the University of Kent with a BA (Hons) in Architecture, we wish him both all the best for the future.

Kent Architecture Student Matthew Downey wins RIBA prize

Congratulations to Matthew Downey, a student here at the Kent Scool of Architecture who has received a prize for excellence from the Royal Institute of British Architects.

Matthew, 24, was the winner of the Diploma Prize at Kent. He received his prize from Derek Nicholson, Chair of RIBA West Kent Branch at the School of Architecture’s recent End of Year Show. The Prize is designed to celebrate the talent of architecture students at the University.

RIBA has stated that the judges were impressed with Matthew’s project, which was a design for Millennium Mills – a derelict 20th century flour mill in London’s Docklands. Matthew proposed a new building as a trade centre that would integrate a mixture of societies, combined with a centre for monitoring immigration. ‘By integrating different technical approaches adopted from a culture’s native way of life, such as their traditional construction methods and materials, the cultures can come together to represent a community.’

Matthew has just completed his MArch Part 2 course towards qualifying as an architect at the University of Kent and we wish him a long and successful career.

Emmanuel Owusu awarded a prize for excellence from RIBA

Emmanuel Owusu, a student at Kent School of Architecture has received a prize for excellence from the Royal Institute of British Architects.

Emmanuel, 20, was the winner of the Degree Prize at Kent. The Prize, which celebrates the talent of architecture students at the University, is awarded jointly by the Branch and by RIBA West Kent Branch: between them the Branches represent more than 600 architects in the county.

RIBA has revealed that the judges were impressed with Emmanuel’s project, which was a design for an extension to the Centre for Urban Culture in Lille. La Maison Du Hip-Hop aims to celebrate the rise of contemporary hip-hop in Lille and in France as a whole and is dedicated to the professional development of hip-hop artists. The project would rejuvenate an area that suffers from high unemployment and declining manufacturing industries. As Emmanuel says, ‘Inspired by the spontaneity of the street dance battle, the scheme aims to contribute to the great strides taken by Lille to be one of the foremost French and European cities’.

Emmanuel has just graduated from the University of Kent with a BA (Hons) in Architecture and we wish him all the best for the future.

Passivhaus research project – Call for sponsors

Dr. Henrik Schoenefeldt is the Principle Investigator of a new research project entitled ‘Interrogating the technical, economic and cultural challenges of delivering the passivhaus standard in the UK’.

The primary aim of the project, which is based on 13 detailed case studies, is to gain an in-depth and critical understanding of the experiences of architects, contractors, manufacturers and engineers with the adoption of the Passivhaus standard in the UK.

The project, which is co-ordinated by Dr. Henrik Schoenefeldt from the Centre for Architecture and Sustainable Environment, involves a collaboration between industry, university-based researchers and post-graduate students. The Passivhaus Trust joined the project as a collaborator and the project has received direct financial support and/or in-kind support from James Anwyl (Eurobuilt), Richard Hawkes (Hawkes Architecture) and Doug Smith (tp Bennett).

The project is now looking for additional industry partners to provide further financial as well as in-kind support. The sponsorship can be for the whole project or for specific events between £500 and £1000 per sponsor. If your company is interested in supporting the project, please contact Dr. Henrik Schoenefeldt: h.schoenefeldt@kent.ac.uk.

For a full summary of the project please click here.