My research group is always open to welcome new, enthusiastic members. Follow the link to view the latest vacancies. For more information on other ways to join us please read on.

Post-doctoral Positions and Research fellowships

In addition to any post-doctoral vacancies currently available, I am happy to support applications for post-doctoral fellowships such as Marie Curie Fellowships, Newton International Fellowships, EPSRC Fellowships, Royal Society University Research Fellowships and Dorothy Hodgkin Fellowships from suitably-qualified, independent researchers (subject to University approval). Just check that you meet the eligibility criteria, write to me with a project proposal and we’ll take it from there. Note that many of these schemes areĀ ad hominemĀ and you would be expected to work indepedently on your own projects. More information on possible fellowships can also be found here.

PhD and MSc (R) projects

I can offer PhD and MSc (R) projects in a number of areas, including unconventional superconductors, entanglement in quantum magnets, AI approahces to condensed matter, and magnetic monopoles. Please drop me a line if you wish to discuss some options, however in order for me to formally consider an application you need to make it through this website. Please make sure that you name me as your preferred supervisor if you want your application to land on my desk in the first instance.

Funded PhD positions currently available are advertised in the vacancies blog category. Note that often the funding comes with specific eligibility criteria. Other sources of funding include the Commonwealth PhD Scholarships. Make sure that when you make an application you mention any funding you may have secured yourself (e.g. a studentship from your country of origin).

MPhys research projects

I also offer every year one or more Master’s (MPhys) research project. If you come to work with me you will be joining a small group of theorists trying to understand strongly-correlated electron systems (SCES), that is, materials whose behaviour cannot be understood in terms of simple, independent-electron approximations. Usually this involves building up simple models that capture the essential features of the problem, leaving out unnecessary details, and then solving this model either on the computer or analytically, if practicable. Because each new problem is unique, students working in my group will typically be writing their own computer codes or developing their theories from scratch.

Current themes spanned by our research include unconventional superconductors, topological transitions and excitations, quantum magnets, optical lattices, and quantum entanglement. Occasionally we also tackle problems within the broader area of complex systems but outside SCES research, e.g. the statistical physics of networks.

For the latest research news and to get a flavour of what we do visit our research blog: https://blogs.kent.ac.uk/strongcorrelations. You can also drop me an email if you want to see an example of research carried out by some of my past students.