MSc Architectural Conservation student, Asma Haddouk, shares her experience of studying at University of Kent

MSc Architectural Conservation student, Asma Haddouk, shares her experience of studying the conservation of historic buildings at the University of Kent over on the MSc Architectural Conservation blog with her post titled, ‘Thoughts from a Medieval Chapel – Studying Architectural Conservation at Kent‘.

The MSc in Architectural Conservation is fully recognised by The Institute of Historic Building Conservation (IHBC). The course provides both a thorough understanding of architectural heritage and the skills required to contribute to the preservation and development of historic sites. Benefiting from its location in the historic city of Canterbury, the programme combines the study of conservation theory and philosophy with an exploration of the technical aspects of repair and reconstruction. The city’s stunning cathedral provides students with an education resource, giving them the opportunity to learn from the conservation of a World Heritage Site.

 

PhD students to present at SAHGB Architectural History Workshop

Two Kent School of Architecture and Planning’s PhD students, Ben Tosland and Rafaella Siagkri are due to present at The Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain’s Architectural History Workshop 2020. This year’s workshop is due to take place at a postponed date, and will take place at The Galley in London. The theme of this year’s workshop is, ‘Beyond the Academy: Architectural History in Heritage, Conservation and Curating’.

Ben Tosland will be presenting with his talk titled, ‘Methodological reflection: problems researching 20th century architecture in the Persian Gulf’. Ben’s doctoral thesis thesis faced numerous methodological challenges which this presentation will discuss, sharing the problems – in some cases unsolved – with researching a region in constant political and economic flux, characterised by cultural, political and economic contrasts. He will discuss the issues surrounding what study material to choose, or which buildings might be necessary, explaining the case studies and architects I chose for my thesis (focusing on Max Lock, Candilis-Josic-Woods, Alfred Roth, Doxiadis Associates and Jørn Utzon), describing their position in the Gulf’s contribution to a picture of a global modernism.

Rafaella Siagkri will be presenting, ‘Virtual Reality as an investigative tool to better understand architecture in historical films’. Her presentation will assess the significance of Virtual Reality (VR) as a reconstruction method. Using 3Ds Max Software to model film sets from the film The Cabinet of Dr Caligari and using Unreal Software to transfer to Oculus Rift technology will allow the generation of VR simulations to be used in this study. This provides the capability to recreate old, iconic expressionist film sets and to better understand its space.

MSc Architectural Conservation students tour restricted areas of Canterbury Cathedral

Kent School of Architecture and Planning MSc Architectural Conservation students recently visited restricted areas of Canterbury Cathedral.

Student, Chandler Hamilton, writes, ‘We had the chance to tour the sections of the Cathedral that are under repair. All these areas are normally unavailable to the public. I focused on Gothic Architecture in my undergraduate degree, and for me, this was a unique opportunity to get a behind-the-scenes tour of a structure that I have studied intensely in the past. The tour started off with meeting the Head of Conservation and Site Manager, Heather Newton, who basically has my dream job! She gave us an introduction to the conservation project and an itinerary for the day. The project that started in 2016 and is set to finish around October 2021 is a 25-million-pound development that is focusing on the roof of the cathedral.’

Read the full blog post about the experience over on the MSc Architectural Conservation blog.

Conservation Principles and Theories

The MSc Architectural Conservation module ‘Conservation Principles and Theories’, recently concluded, had another very positive year. Module convenor, Dr Manolo Guerci, reflects below:

The group, made by professionals in different fields, from the planning to the conservation sector, as well as from the broader constituency of architectural work, was very cohese. As usual, the module engaged the theoretical as well as the practical analysis of areas based in Canterbury, but not exclusively, considering that students can chose their own sites for both tasks related to the module. This year we also benefitted again by international experts, who contribute to our module. Prof. Judi Loach, professor emerita at the University of Cardiff, and a leading scholar in the field of architectural conservation, delivered a stimulating lecture on ‘The 20th century, a case study: ways of conserving Le Corbusier’. Prof. Loach had led DocoMomo UK, and her expertise on the topic was extremely useful to our cohort.

MSc Architectural Conservation students also benefits from an extensive corpus of weekly lectures and seminars organised by the three reseach centres in the school, respectively dealing with history and theory, sustainable environment, and digital architecture. The school’s student association also runs a programme of lectures, while our PhD students give weekly seminars where their research is presented in an informal environment. Indeed, students from our masters programmes often continue with doctoral research in the school. And Marcon is no exception. Joining our programme is an excellent way to both gain expertise in the broader field of conservation, and to equip yourself for further academic research.

IMAGE: MSC ARCHITECTURAL CONSERVATION STUDENT, JOEL HOPKINSON

Interested in Postgraduate Study? Join one of our Google Hangouts to find out more

Kent School of Architecture and Planning are pleased to announce we will be hosting a series of Google Hangouts for prospective students and current applicants interested in our postgraduate courses. These events are free, and will be held online, hosted by our respective programme directors. The full list of dates and times are below:

To book your place on any of our online Google Hangouts, please email ksapadmissions@kent.ac.uk with the Google Hangout(s) you would like to attend, and the email address you would like your invitation sent to.

Scholarships available for new MSc Bio Digital Architecture

The Kent School of Architecture and Planning (KSAP) are excited to announce the availability of four scholarships for students wishing to study the new MSc Bio Digital Architecture course.

The Bio Digital Architecture Outstanding Student Award is funded by the Kent School of Architecture and Planning for students starting full time on the course in September 2019. The award consists of a 50% fee waiver at the 2019/20 full time Home/EU/Overseas rate.

This new master’s programme will teach you how to think about architecture experimentally. You will study computational design methods, and new modes of simulation and production, which will be complemented with contemporary scientific ideas from the life sciences. Thinking interdisciplinarily, you will learn to apply contemporary architecture and scientific ideas, to think about space and form generatively to create innovative and exciting architectural scenarios.

Please visit the KSAP website to find out more about the Bio Digital Architecture programme and information on how to apply.

PGR Seminar Series commences with Ben Tosland

The first PGR presentation of this year will be held on Wed 5th April at 15.00, and will be given by postgraduate research student Ben Tosland, with his talk entitled ‘The development of green spaces and influence of western landscape architecture in the Persian Gulf during the late twentieth-century’.

Ben’s research aims to show the extent of Western influence over landscape design in the Persian Gulf and its relationship with town planning movements throughout the twentieth-century. Supported through archival research and several case studies, Ben will argue that the Western design of landscapes in the region is due to both the influx of people from Europe and America who worked with oil companies, and their subsequent funding of landscape work. Added to this, there are changing sociological and political forces in the region during this period that will also be assessed. Several themes and sub-themes that will be shown through his research will be:

  • Identity and representation
  • Segregation and inequality
  • Morphology of spatial design
  • Relationship between landscape and townscape

This short talk will attempt to give the context to this research by representing statistics through maps of the region before looking at a chosen case study and briefly explaining how the aforementioned themes affected the design process and the eventual outcome.

Kent School of Architecture Summer School 2017

The University of Kent’s high-quality postgraduate-level summer schools with academic credit are designed for anyone who would like to study one or more of the inspiring courses taught at the University’s locations in three of Europe’s most important cities.

Building on our reputation for interdisciplinary study you will spend time with fellow students and academics studying your chosen subject in specially chosen locations with state-of-the-art facilities.  If you are considering postgraduate study at Kent, either in the UK or at one of our specialist postgraduate centres across Europe, a summer school is a great opportunity to discover more about your subject and the University.

The Summer Schools are two weeks long and run in June, July and August 2017, allowing you to attend one or more, and discover what it is like to be a student at our Canterbury, Brussels or Paris locations.

Kent School of Architecture will be running an Architecture Summer School at the Canterbury Campus from the 2nd – 16th July 2017. Take part in presentations, design workshops, lectures and site visits and become part of a creative community that comprises of well-respected researchers, highly skilled architects, engineers and design professionals.

Studying at a summer school with the University of Kent, ranked 23 out of 119 institutions in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2017), you will benefit from expert teaching, on-campus accommodation (in Canterbury), social activities, excellent resources and facilities and an opportunity to enhance your career or progress to postgraduate study.

Scholarships and discounts

  • We have a limited number of full and part scholarships to award.
  • Tiered discounts when studying more than one course.
  • Discounts of £150 if you book and pay in full by 5 May 2017
  • Brussels Summer School students are entitled to 10% discount if they subsequently enrol on a Master’s degree at the Brussels centre.

Find out more: www.kent.ac.uk/summerschools

Contact us: summerschools@kent.ac.uk