Professor Gerald Adler and Dr Manolo Guerci celebrate ‘Riverine, Architectures and Rivers’ book launch

Gerald Adler and Manolo Guerci recently launched their newly published book Riverine. Architecture and Rivers (Routledge 2019) at the London office of the architects Penoyre and Prasad, who kindly hosted the event. The poet and contributor to the book Kate Miller read from her poem ‘Waterloo Sunrise’, while Manolo Guerci recited an extract in the original dialect of ‘Er Temporale’, a poem from the 19th century Roman poet Gioacchino Belli. Gerald Adler concluded the event by remarking the genesis and range of the book, which brings together essays and photographic excursi dealing with all aspects of riverine, from east to west, north to south.

 

Dr Manolo Guerci to give talk at Sir John Soane’s Museum

Dr Manolo Guerci will be giving a talk titled, ‘The Great Houses of the Strand: an overview’ at Sir John Soane’s museum in London on Tuesday 4 June. Based on his upcoming book, ‘Great Houses of the Strand: the Ruling Elite at Home in Tudor and Jacobean London’, Dr Guerci will give an overview of the ‘so-called Strand palaces’ in London. For further information about the talk and to book your place, see here.

CREAte are pleased to announce the publication of Riverine: Architecture and Rivers by Routledge

Riverscapes are the main arteries of the world’s largest cities, and have, for millennia, been the lifeblood of the urban communities that have developed around them. These human settlements – given life hrough the space of the local waterscapes – soon developed into ritualised spaces that sought to harness the dynamism of the watercourse and create local architectural landscape. Theorised via a sophisticated understanding of history, space, culture, and ecology, this collection of wonderful and deliberately wide-ranging case studies, from Early Modern Italy tyo the contemporary Bngal Delta, investigates the culture of human interaction with rivers and the nature of urban topography. Riverine explores the ways in which architecture and urban planning have imbued cultural landscapes with ritual and structural meaning.

Edited by Gerald Adler and Manolo Guerci, the book results from the CREAte (Centre for Research in European Architecture) conference held in 2014, and contains a selection of papers from that event in addition to pieces specially commissioned for the publication.

KSA partners with the British Council on Venice Fellowships Programme

Kent School of Architecture is delighted to announce a partnership with the British Council on the 2018 Venice Fellowships Programme which forms part of the British Pavilion at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia. KSA will support three students to spend a month in Venice, conducting independent research and invigilating the exhibition, Island, curated by Caruso St John Architects working in collaboration with artist Marcus Taylor.

Students from the School of Architecture are given an exclusive opportunity to spend a month in Venice during one of the world’s most significant art and architecture exhibitions organised by La Biennale di Venezia, which will run from 26 May to 25 November 2018. They will be invigilating the British Pavilion and undertaking independent research projects while in Venice.

The Venice Fellowships Programme offers our students, graduates and researchers the opportunity to become actively involved in La Biennale di Venezia and gain first-hand experience of the British Pavilion, this year’s curators and their vision. We have selected some of our brightest students or most motivated researchers to Venice to embark on a unique personal and creative experience.

Professor Don Gray of Kent School of Architecture said, “Our students have benefitted from taking part in previous Biennales, and Kent School of Architecture is delighted to once again support the scheme and our talented students.  The experience of stewarding the pavilion and undertaking independent research projects is a once in a lifetime opportunity.”

Laura Broderick, Venice Fellowships Programme Manager, British Council said, “The Venice Fellowships programme is a fantastic international experience for students and graduates – with bespoke training in London, skills development opportunities at the British Pavilion, and a chance to expand networks across the UK. The Fellows are involved in research and the production of creative responses to the Biennale and Venice itself. This is key for our UK partners engaged in improving outward mobility and employability. For the British Council, it is very important to support emerging artists, architects, curators and researchers – and to place informed stewards at the heart of the British Pavilion .”

The British Pavilion at Biennale Architettura 2018, commissioned by the British Council, will be represented by the work Island from Caruso St John Architects working in collaboration with artist Marcus Taylor, with the construction of a new public space on the roof of the pavilion building.

Throughout Biennale Architettura 2018 the Pavilion of Great Britain will programme a unique series of events including poetry, performance, film and architectural talks and debates in response to Freespace and ideas raised by Island. The British Council has been responsible for the British Pavilion in Venice since 1937, showcasing the best of the UK’s artists, architects, designers and curators to an international audience.

The Fellowships programme was initiated in 2014 by the British Council to strengthen the British Pavilion contribution as a platform for ideas and research. This programme aims to educate and enrich the exhibition, making it a reference point for universities and arts institutions. The Fellowships offers a way of viewing and experiencing art and architecture that provides a new outlook on issues of public and private space, artistic process and display.

Dr Manolo Guerci to give lecture at ‘Mazarin, Rome et l’Italie’ conference

Dr Manolo Guerci will give a lecture on the artistic relationships between Italy and France through the analysis of the style of the Palazzo Mancini in Rome at the international conference ‘Mazarin, Rome et l’Italie’, to be held at the Bibliotheque Mazarin and the Ecole des Chartes in Paris, 11 to 13 May. This is part of Dr Guerci’s longstanding studies on the two contexts, which he has also been comparing with the English one.

Dr Manolo Guerci elected as a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London

Dr Manolo Guerci, KSA Director of Graduate Studies, has been elected as a Fellow of the Society of Antiquaries of London, England’s oldest and highly prestigious society for the preservation of architectural and artistic heritage (https://www.sal.org.uk/about-us/our-history/). This is an important recognition of Dr Guerci’s work, which has concentrated, over the past fifteen years, on Early-Modern European palaces, particularly in Italy, France and England. Dr Guerci’s latest book on the Great Houses of Strand: the ruling elite at home in Tudor and Jacoben London, will be published by Yale University Press.

Two new prestigious fellowships awarded as KSA has reached 7th position in the Complete University Guide for Architecture

We are delighted that two of our academic members have been awarded prestigious fellowships. Dr Manolo Guerci was recently elected to a Paul Mellon Mid-Career Fellowship and Dr David H. Haney was awarded a Leverhulme Fellowship.  Both of them will be on a writing sabbatical for the academic year 2015-16. This highlights the School’s environment that is conducive to research of international excellence, placing us firmly along with the best schools of architecture in the country.

Dr Manolo Guerci elected for a Career Fellowship

Dr Manolo Guerci was recently elected to a Paul Mellon Mid Career Fellowship to complete his book on Great Houses of the Strand: The Ruling Elite at Home in Tudor and Jacobean London to be published by Yale University Press.

The book develops from Dr Guerci’s PhD on the so-called ‘Strand palaces’, some eleven major houses built or extended between the 1550s and 1650s along the Strand, the ‘great channel of communication’ between the City in the East and Westminster in the West, respectively England’s economic and political centres. The history of these palaces covers a highly significant if much neglected chapter of London’s architecture. They are the perfect media to analyse the English court and its ties with the Continent during one of the most interesting political, social and artistic periods in British history.

Image: View of the so called ‘Covent Garden Area’ by Wenceslaus Hollar (mid. 17th c – British Library).

Riverine Conference 2014

The Riverine conference, organised by Prof. Gerald Adler and Dr Manolo Guerci from the 26th to the 29th of June at the Kent School of Architecture, University of Kent, explored the relationship between architecture and rivers at a number of scales, from the geographical, topographical, through the urban, infrastructural, down to that of the individual building or space. It sought to examine the interface between terrain and water through the techniques and cultures of landscape, urban, architectural and material history and design, and through cross cultural studies in art, literature, and social and cultural history. This diverse and multi-disciplinary approach resulted in a lively and most interesting cohort of delegates from all over the world, who commented very positively on the overall outcome of debates.

The conference ended with a guided tour along the course of the River Thames, from its Essex marshland habitat up to its south bank development in London. A book exploring the various strands of the discussion with contributions by the delegates will now be put together by the organisers, and will be published in due course by Routledge.