Dr Manolo Guerci discusses KSAP’s adaptability during Covid-19

Senior Lecturer, Dr Manolo Guerci, shares his thoughts and observations with Press and Public Relations Officer, Olivia Miller, on ‘how teaching and learning within the Kent School of Architecture and Planning has adapted to the COVID-19 pandemic.’

BA year coordinators: Rebecca Hobbs (Stage 1), Felicity Atekpe (Stage 2), and Dr Ambrose Gillick (Stage 3), provided key insight and information, as well as Michael Richards, MArch Programme Director, who was also part of a number of discussions which led to this contribution, and indeed trialled and implemented with Dr Guerci quite a lot of what is highlighted in the full Q&A which you can read the full Q&A online now.

Dr Manolo Guerci to present at Giancarlo De Carlo GDC100 ‘Resonances’ Seminar

Senior Lecturer, Dr Manolo Guerci will be presenting at the upcoming Giancarlo De Carlo GDC100 ‘Resonances’ Seminar taking place on Thursday 16 July at 15.30 BST.

The ‘Resonances’ seminar aims to share ideas and comments on the wide selection of texts by Giancarlo De Carlo proposed in the marathon. The texts are a source and a guide to an extraordinary methodology of reading the place as a fundamental starting point for the design project. A panel of speakers from British universities involved in the marathon will open the discussion to invite all the readers and interested students to propose their thoughts and add new keywords.

Dr Manolo Guerci writes, “The conversation will be on Giancarlo De Carlo and his relationship with the Renaissance, particularly with Francesco di Giorgio Martini. It will focus on an essay De Carlo wrote in 1985 on the Palazzo Ducale in Urbino titled: Gli Spiriti del Palazzo Ducale (the ghosts of the Palazzo Ducale in Urbino). One of the masterpieces of the Italian Renaissance at the hearth of Federico da Montefeltro’s patronage, the Palazzo Ducale has long been a subject of fascination for me. As well as the workshop of leading architect-engineers such as Di Giorgio Martini, the palace is also known as the setting of the conversations which Baldassare Castiglione represents as having taken place in the Hall of Vigils in 1507 in his celebrated Book of the Courtier. De Carlo’s essay provides interesting insights.”

If you would like to attend, please use the following link via Zoom:

https://zoom.us/j/93837326233
Password: 685110

You can also keep up to date with Giancarlo De Carlo GDC100 on Instagram.

Find out more about Architectural Conservation in Kent and Beyond

Kent School of Architecture and Planning are pleased to announce that we are hosting an online event for you to find out more about the world of Architectural Conservation with Programme Director, Dr Nikolaos Karydis, Senior Lecturer, Dr Manolo Guerci, and PhD student, Anske Bax on Tuesday 30 June at 14.00.

Never has it been so important to have the right skill sets and experience in the job market, now more than ever is the time to invest in higher education to better your chances. The MSc Architectural Conservation provides an invaluable process in delivering a theoretical knowledge to Heritage Conservation, and perhaps even more rewarding is the on-site experience within the modules. Participation with conservation professionals and organisations, provide a unique opportunity of seeing the multiple sectors of conservation practice, helping you to decide the right direction for a truly exciting and rewarding career.

2:00 – 2:30. ‘Recapturing Lost Architectural Heritage’, lecture by Dr Nikolaos Karydis

This lecture presents recent research in the visualisation of historic buildings in Turkey, Italy and the UK. It also shows how this research informs our teaching in the MSc programme in Architectural Conservation and presents recent student proposals for the repair and reuse of historic buildings in Kent.

2:30 – 3:00. ‘Studying Conservation in Kent’,  Anske Bax and Nikolaos Karydis

MSc in Architectural Conservation alumnus Anske Bax discusses with Nikolaos Karydis, the programme director, about his experience of studying architectural conservation and the way in which his postgraduate course prepared him for his current doctoral research in the University of Kent.

3.00 – 3.30. ‘Why do we preserve and why does it matter?’, Dr Manolo Guerci

This lecture asks a fundamental question when it comes to our understanding of the very complex factors that govern decisions on how we deal with our heritage. In particular, the lecture will highlight what is perhaps the main issue: how we manage a balance between those categories which naturally make a building worth preserving and those (many) controversial instances, across all periods. For, whilst regulations do exist – and vary according to different contexts, their interpretations depend on many factors (political, historical, cultural, economic, etc.). The module is therefore concerned with the historical and cultural aspects behind this complex scenario, so as to provide with an appropriate background for the choices that need to be made when approaching conservation.

If you’d like to attend this free online event taking place on Zoom, email ksapadmissions@kent.ac.uk to book your place.

PhD Student Anske Bax takes part in Online Reading Marathon

GIANCARLO DE CARLO AT 100 – Online Reading Marathon participation with Kent University and the Kent School of Architecture & Planning.  

By Anske Bax

What is it?

A public marathon of reading and visiting the works of Italian architect Giancarlo De Carlo. Promoted on social media through Instagram among the initiatives by the Committee for the Centennial of Giancarlo De Carlo. The reading marathon organised by Professor Antonello Alici of the University of Politecnica delle Marche, is entrusted to students and housed in De Carlo’s places and architectures in Italy and abroad. The two-years long programme promotes a research network of schools and institutions; inviting master and doctoral students to participate in a marathon of re-reading and re-visiting the writings and projects by Giancarlo De Carlo. The four-minute readings seek to encourage research seminars and symposia. Kent School of Architecture was one of the international institutions to have participated in the readings on the 2nd May 2020.

Who was Giancarlo de Carlo?

Giancarlo De Carlo (12 December 1919 − 4 June 2005) is a major figure in the architectural debate and practice of the 20th century for his capacity of reading contexts and exploring the tensions of the city. He built his first theoretical steps on William Morris and Patrick Geddes and revived the legacy of Giuseppe Pagano and Edoardo Persico. In 1993 he was awarded the RIBA Gold Medal, following the suggestion of Colin St John Wilson, who praised him as ‘the Master of Resistance’ and  ‘the most lucid of his generation of architect-philosophers-in-action’ – for his tireless critical action within the Modern Movement.

University of Kent’s involvement and perspective

International collaboration and wider project participation are very much the norm at the Kent School of Architecture and Planning. A mindset that I noticed almost immediately upon joining the school as a doctoral student. These proud collaborations including the marathon reading for Giancarlo De Carlo harness a wider academic unity and through peer involvement encourages one to open one’s mind in architectural theory. These projects are thanks to the wonderful staff of our department, including my experience made possible by the kind efforts of Dr Manolo Guerci and fellow PhD colleague, Benedetta Castagna.  It was a true honour to be asked to read an extract (Reading 7.1) by Giancarlo De Carlo about the work of Le Corbusier. The Swiss born architect who De Carlo identified as someone who was able to create a defined architectural language, but at some point, it lost connection with the reality of the contexts. A clear statement of De Carlo’s conception about the Modern Movement. My reading is one of many enlightening texts on the Instagram page. I would encourage anyone to participate in this two-year project by emailing myself or Benedetta Castagna.

 

Conservation Principles and Theories

The MSc Architectural Conservation module ‘Conservation Principles and Theories’, recently concluded, had another very positive year. Module convenor, Dr Manolo Guerci, reflects below:

The group, made by professionals in different fields, from the planning to the conservation sector, as well as from the broader constituency of architectural work, was very cohese. As usual, the module engaged the theoretical as well as the practical analysis of areas based in Canterbury, but not exclusively, considering that students can chose their own sites for both tasks related to the module. This year we also benefitted again by international experts, who contribute to our module. Prof. Judi Loach, professor emerita at the University of Cardiff, and a leading scholar in the field of architectural conservation, delivered a stimulating lecture on ‘The 20th century, a case study: ways of conserving Le Corbusier’. Prof. Loach had led DocoMomo UK, and her expertise on the topic was extremely useful to our cohort.

MSc Architectural Conservation students also benefits from an extensive corpus of weekly lectures and seminars organised by the three reseach centres in the school, respectively dealing with history and theory, sustainable environment, and digital architecture. The school’s student association also runs a programme of lectures, while our PhD students give weekly seminars where their research is presented in an informal environment. Indeed, students from our masters programmes often continue with doctoral research in the school. And Marcon is no exception. Joining our programme is an excellent way to both gain expertise in the broader field of conservation, and to equip yourself for further academic research.

IMAGE: MSC ARCHITECTURAL CONSERVATION STUDENT, JOEL HOPKINSON

Professor Gerald Adler and Dr Manolo Guerci celebrate ‘Riverine, Architectures and Rivers’ book launch

Gerald Adler and Manolo Guerci recently launched their newly published book Riverine. Architecture and Rivers (Routledge 2019) at the London office of the architects Penoyre and Prasad, who kindly hosted the event. The poet and contributor to the book Kate Miller read from her poem ‘Waterloo Sunrise’, while Manolo Guerci recited an extract in the original dialect of ‘Er Temporale’, a poem from the 19th century Roman poet Gioacchino Belli. Gerald Adler concluded the event by remarking the genesis and range of the book, which brings together essays and photographic excursi dealing with all aspects of riverine, from east to west, north to south.

 

Dr Manolo Guerci to give talk at Sir John Soane’s Museum

Dr Manolo Guerci will be giving a talk titled, ‘The Great Houses of the Strand: an overview’ at Sir John Soane’s museum in London on Tuesday 4 June. Based on his upcoming book, ‘Great Houses of the Strand: the Ruling Elite at Home in Tudor and Jacobean London’, Dr Guerci will give an overview of the ‘so-called Strand palaces’ in London. For further information about the talk and to book your place, see here.

CREAte are pleased to announce the publication of Riverine: Architecture and Rivers by Routledge

Riverscapes are the main arteries of the world’s largest cities, and have, for millennia, been the lifeblood of the urban communities that have developed around them. These human settlements – given life hrough the space of the local waterscapes – soon developed into ritualised spaces that sought to harness the dynamism of the watercourse and create local architectural landscape. Theorised via a sophisticated understanding of history, space, culture, and ecology, this collection of wonderful and deliberately wide-ranging case studies, from Early Modern Italy tyo the contemporary Bngal Delta, investigates the culture of human interaction with rivers and the nature of urban topography. Riverine explores the ways in which architecture and urban planning have imbued cultural landscapes with ritual and structural meaning.

Edited by Gerald Adler and Manolo Guerci, the book results from the CREAte (Centre for Research in European Architecture) conference held in 2014, and contains a selection of papers from that event in addition to pieces specially commissioned for the publication.

KSA partners with the British Council on Venice Fellowships Programme

Kent School of Architecture is delighted to announce a partnership with the British Council on the 2018 Venice Fellowships Programme which forms part of the British Pavilion at the 16th International Architecture Exhibition – La Biennale di Venezia. KSA will support three students to spend a month in Venice, conducting independent research and invigilating the exhibition, Island, curated by Caruso St John Architects working in collaboration with artist Marcus Taylor.

Students from the School of Architecture are given an exclusive opportunity to spend a month in Venice during one of the world’s most significant art and architecture exhibitions organised by La Biennale di Venezia, which will run from 26 May to 25 November 2018. They will be invigilating the British Pavilion and undertaking independent research projects while in Venice.

The Venice Fellowships Programme offers our students, graduates and researchers the opportunity to become actively involved in La Biennale di Venezia and gain first-hand experience of the British Pavilion, this year’s curators and their vision. We have selected some of our brightest students or most motivated researchers to Venice to embark on a unique personal and creative experience.

Professor Don Gray of Kent School of Architecture said, “Our students have benefitted from taking part in previous Biennales, and Kent School of Architecture is delighted to once again support the scheme and our talented students.  The experience of stewarding the pavilion and undertaking independent research projects is a once in a lifetime opportunity.”

Laura Broderick, Venice Fellowships Programme Manager, British Council said, “The Venice Fellowships programme is a fantastic international experience for students and graduates – with bespoke training in London, skills development opportunities at the British Pavilion, and a chance to expand networks across the UK. The Fellows are involved in research and the production of creative responses to the Biennale and Venice itself. This is key for our UK partners engaged in improving outward mobility and employability. For the British Council, it is very important to support emerging artists, architects, curators and researchers – and to place informed stewards at the heart of the British Pavilion .”

The British Pavilion at Biennale Architettura 2018, commissioned by the British Council, will be represented by the work Island from Caruso St John Architects working in collaboration with artist Marcus Taylor, with the construction of a new public space on the roof of the pavilion building.

Throughout Biennale Architettura 2018 the Pavilion of Great Britain will programme a unique series of events including poetry, performance, film and architectural talks and debates in response to Freespace and ideas raised by Island. The British Council has been responsible for the British Pavilion in Venice since 1937, showcasing the best of the UK’s artists, architects, designers and curators to an international audience.

The Fellowships programme was initiated in 2014 by the British Council to strengthen the British Pavilion contribution as a platform for ideas and research. This programme aims to educate and enrich the exhibition, making it a reference point for universities and arts institutions. The Fellowships offers a way of viewing and experiencing art and architecture that provides a new outlook on issues of public and private space, artistic process and display.

Dr Manolo Guerci to give lecture at ‘Mazarin, Rome et l’Italie’ conference

Dr Manolo Guerci will give a lecture on the artistic relationships between Italy and France through the analysis of the style of the Palazzo Mancini in Rome at the international conference ‘Mazarin, Rome et l’Italie’, to be held at the Bibliotheque Mazarin and the Ecole des Chartes in Paris, 11 to 13 May. This is part of Dr Guerci’s longstanding studies on the two contexts, which he has also been comparing with the English one.