Tag: CASE

BBC reports on Dr Henrik Schoenefeldt’s research at Houses of Parliament

Dr Schoenefeldt’s current research project at the Houses of Parliament was featured on the BBC. It was subject of the special report ‘Political hot air’ on BBC South East Today, 18 April 2019, 6.30. Henrik took Robin Gibbons, BBC broadcast journalists, around the hidden voids of the Palace of Westminster and gave an interviews on his academic research. The project aims to provide a critical understanding of the design, history and performance of the 19th century ventilation system of the Houses of Parliament, and to explore the possibility of revitalising the currently disused system during the restoration of the Palace of Westminster. A brief summary of the project can be found on the parliamentary website here and it has also been the subject of a cover article in the CIBSE Journal.

 

Dr Richard Watkins discusses the European heatwave on Euronews

Dr Richard Watkins, member of CASE Research Centre, was recently interviewed live on Euronews to discuss the European heatwave, and to understand what is being done to control the temperatures in cities, and prospective future proposals.

Dr Watkins explains that the main approaches to cooling cities are to reflect away the sun’s energy, to absorb it and use it to evaporate water and to provide shading to improve outdoor and indoor comfort. Richard pointed out that the high temperatures, approaching 40°C, globally are not unusual and where it is this hot architecture has evolved to protect people. In the temperate and northern temperate regions we are not used to these very high temperatures and this presents a challenge. Watch the full interview below, courtesy of Euronews.

Professor Marialena Nikolopoulou participated in International Seminar on Courtyard Performance

The International Seminar on Courtyard Performance and Thermal Modeling at the University of Seville focused on the results from a recent project on the environmental performance of courtyards, involving detailed monitoring, mathematical modelling, dynamic thermal simulations and energy analysis.  The seminar, which was held at the School of Architecture of Seville, involved collaborations with researchers from the groups of Thermal Technology, Mathematical Modeling, and Simulation of Environmental Systems, Material Technology and Building Systems, as well as the Universities of Cadiz, Harvard and Kent.

Professor Marialena Nikolopoulou, Deputy Head of School, and founder of the Centre of Architecture and Sustainable Environment, gave a keynote presentation, in what marked the beginning of a new collaboration with Kent School of Architecture and Planning in the context of a new project on the role of courtyards in contemporary architecture.

Professor Marialena Nikolopoulou features in CIBSE Journal

Deputy Head of School, Professor Marialena Nikolopoulou, features in a recent article in the CIBSE Journal, ‘Prime example – How industry can promote diversity in engineering‘. Following the recent appointment of the first female CIBSE President, reporter Liza Young looks into diversity and equality, and female role models within engineering organisations.

Professor Nikolopoulou was Director of Research and Director of CASE (Centre for Architecture and the Sustainable Environment) until recently, and is also the MSc Architecture and Sustainable Environment programme director.

Upcoming CASE Open Lecture presents John Mardaljevic

The next CASE Open Lecture will be given by John Mardaljevic, with his talk titled, ‘New York Times to Central Park Tower: Daylight Modelling for Performance, Planning and Conservation’ on Tuesday 29 January 2019 at 6PM in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

When completed in 2020, Central Park Tower (New York City) will become the world’s tallest residential building and the second tallest skyscraper in the US. Measures of daylight injury predicted using climate-based daylight modelling (CBDM) formed part of the legal agreement for the design/development of the tower. This is the first instance, anywhere in the world, where daylight injury predicted using CBDM has played a substantive part in the legal agreement for the development of a building. NYC was also the location for a landmark daylight simulation project that began in 2004: daylighting the New York Times Building (architect Renzo Piano). At the time, the New York Times study greatly pushed the limits of what was believed to be achievable using daylight simulation on a live building project. These two milestone projects encompass a period where CBDM transitioned from a novel idea with potential to the mainstay for both research and practice worldwide. This lecture will illustrate real-world application of CBDM in diverse areas using the examples from New York City together with others from code compliance and heritage/conservation.

All welcome!

CASE Dalby Square Project ‘highly commended’ at Kent Design and Development Awards

The Centre for Architecture and the Sustainable Environment’s Dalby Square project was shortlisted in three categories: Conservation, Residential Minor and Environmental  Performance in the Kent Design and Development Awards and won ‘highly commended’ in the Environmental Performance category. Focusing on key national priorities of climate change and aging population, the project evaluated exemplar climate change adaptation and retrofit strategies for heritage townhouses, while promoting opportunities for inter-generational living.

The Dalby Square project in Margate is a cross-sector collaboration between Kent County Council (KCC), Thanet District Council, CASE (Centre for Architecture and Sustainable Environment) at the University of Kent, the School of Psychology and the private sector. The aim was to develop and retrofit the KCC owned property at 12a Dalby Square into an exemplar residence that simultaneously addresses the challenges of climate change and promotes opportunities for inter-generational living, whilst also ensuring that the existing architectural details of the property are conserved and restored.

The refurbishment of the heritage townhouse in Dalby Square, Margate, has been completed and Kent County Council are looking for tenants. The three-generation family will be part of the innovative project, where extensive monitoring will take place, to evaluate the climate change adaptation strategies, whilst focusing on overheating, thermal comfort and energy performance, while testing the concept of multi-generation living. A ‘Sustainable Heritage Toolkit’ will be published to help other coastal towns across the UK.

Historic Building Services Symposium featured in CIBSE Journal

A symposium held at the Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) on 25 July 2018, organised by Dr Henrik Schoenefeldt in collaboration with CIBSE Heritage Group has been featured in an article in the September issue of CIBSE Journal, written by Liza Young, Deputy Editor. To read the full article, please see here: http://portfolio.cpl.co.uk/CIBSE/201809/28/.

The symposium, ‘Historic Building Services in Education, Practice and Research’, explored the value of studying historic building services and how it can inform the practice and education of building service engineers today. Through talks and discussions, the event provided a forum for practitioners, engineers and educators to investigate these questions. Speakers and panel chairs included Professor Dean Hawkes, University of Cambridge, Dr Neil Sturrock, Chairman of CIBSE Heritage Group, Caroline Cattini, Historic England, Phil Jones, Chairman of CIBSE CHP & District Heating Group, Dr Henrik Schoenefeldt, University of Kent, Andrew More, Senior Building Services Engineer, Historic England.

Kent School of Architecture MSc Architecture and Sustainable Environment students, and CASE (Centre for Architecture and the Sustainable Environment) PhD students presented their work at the event, in addition to a PhD student from Cardiff University.

Urban Albedo project hosts workshop at London City Hall

CASE (Centre for Architecture and the Sustainable Environment) organised a very successful workshop at London’s Living Room, City Hall on Monday 15th October 2018, marking the beginning of Green GB week.  The workshop, ‘Urban Albedo: Digital tools for urban resilience and growth’, was co-orgnised with Greater London Authority and the London Climate Change Partnership (LCCP), along with Brunel University and Loughborough University, who are both project partners.

The workshop, chaired by the former President of the Urban Design Group, Colin Pullan, brought together leading urban and building scientists, as well as practitioners from different backgrounds, to inform the impact of urban morphology and materials on urban albedo and its importance for health and well-being.

The speakers from the Industry Panel included:

  • The Concrete Centre
  • Fosters + Partners
  • SWECO
  • IESVE
  • CIBSE Resilient Cities

For further information about the Urban Albedo research project, please see here.

CASE Open Lecture: Dr Susan Parham, University of Hertfordshire

The upcoming CASE Open Lecture will be given by Dr Susan Parham, Head of Urbanism and Planning at the University of Hertfordshire on Tuesday 16th October at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Her talk entitled, ‘Just what is ‘sustainable urbanism’ when it comes to food?’ will explore some of the ways cities and food are intertwined – drawing on urbanism research from the historical and contemporary city and its peri-urban edges, and will consider food’s sustainability as a highly contested area today in relation to what foodspace ‘works best’. Drawing on her own (and others’) applied research in the UK and elsewhere, Susan will consider some current design and planning focused urban foodscape and systems proposals for food-centred placemaking and retrofitting. Susan will argue the proposition that these approaches might contribute to responding to sharpening sustainability imperatives now and into the future.

Dr Susan Parham is Head of Urbanism and Planning at the University of Hertfordshire and Academic Director of the International Garden Cities Institute (IGCI). She researches and teaches on placemaking including food and urban design, planned settlements, sustainable materials, and masterplanning and retrofitting. Susan’s most recent book is Food and Urbanism (Bloomsbury, 2015) and her latest book chapters are in The Routledge Handbook of Landscape and Food (2018), Agrourbanism (2018) and in Future Directions for the European Shrinking City (RTPI Library Series, 2016). Susan is a member of the Royal Society for the Arts and the Royal Town Planning Institute.

dalby_square_margate

Climate change adaptation and intergeneration living in a heritage townhouse in Margate

CASE, alongside Thanet Council and the School of Psychology, have been working on the Dalby Square project in Margate.

The project aims to tackle climate change, an ageing population and housing shortages. The refurbishment of the heritage townhouse in Dalby Square, Margate, has now been completed and Kent County Council are seeking the tenants. The three-generation family will be part of the innovative project, where extensive monitoring will take place, to evaluate the climate change adaptation strategies, focusing on overheating, thermal comfort and energy performance, while testing the concept of multi-generation living. The team was interviewed for the BBC news for the south-east last autumn.

At the end of the project, a ‘Sustainable Heritage Toolkit’ will be published to help other coastal towns across the UK.

Further information about the project can be found here and for more information about applying for the scheme, please contact Oakwood Homes on 01843 221133.