Author Archives: Jessica Thomas

Staff Day at bOing! Festival – Friday 27 August

Gulbenkian Arts Centre are offering Kent staff and their families an opportunity to see Jasmin Vardimon Company’s new virtual reality performance ‘Alice’ for free at the University of Kent staff day at bOing! Festival.

The experience is sold out over the weekend, but we have a limited number of timeslots on Friday 27 August for University of Kent staff and their families to experience Alice (VR).  Step out of the ordinary and into the unexpected, fantastical and fearless world of Jasmin Vardimon’s ‘Alice in Wonderland’ VR experience. Tickets must be booked in advance for Alice.

University of Kent Staff Day at bOing! Festival is an extra special day before the festival weekend kicks off just for University of Kent Staff and their families on Friday 27 August!

Organised as a big thank you from the University to all Kent Staff in recognition for the tremendous effort put in by all throughout the year, the Staff Family Day at bOing! is FREE for Kent Staff and their families to attend.

Whether you’ve been working on site or remotely, this is an opportunity to reunite with family and colleagues in person for an amazing summer day on campus filled with FREE live performance, music and fun for all!

Everybody’s invited, so say a proper farewell and invite colleagues who have left while we have all been working remotely.

Free refreshments will also be on offer with a £5 credit loaded to Kent Staff KentOne cards that can be redeemed at any University of Kent catering outlet on campus.

All events are free to attend, but please register your attendance by following the booking link.
Tickets for Alice (VR) must be booked separately.

Friday’s Schedule

12 – 5pm (timeslots throughout the afternoon) – UoK Staff timeslots for Alice (VR) – BOOK TICKETS

12.30 – 12.50pm – The Puppet Van: The Lost Colour

Outdoor chaos 2m in the air featuring clowning and puppetry from Kent Alumni company Half A String.

1pm – 1.30pm – Gandini Juggling’s Smashed2
Funny and inventive juggling performance featuring a lot of fruit.

2 – 2.20pm – UPSWING’s Catch Me
A playful mix of dance, circus and chairs.

3.30 – 4pm – Gandini Juggling’s Smashed2
Funny and inventive juggling performance featuring a lot of fruit.

4 – 4.20pm – The Puppet Van: The Lost Colour

Outdoor chaos 2m in the air featuring clowning and puppetry from Kent Alumni company Half A String.

4.30 – 4.50pm – UPSWING’s Catch Me
A playful mix of dance, circus and chairs.

5 – 7pm – Global Sounds Music Stage
Programmed by Music for Change, enjoy some summer sounds under the sun.

Find out more about bOing! Kent’s Family Arts Festival

bOing! Kent’s Family Arts Festival is open to the general public on Saturday 28 and 29 August 2021 with a range of free and ticketed events. Funded by Arts Council England and the University of Kent, bOing! welcomes the most innovative and exciting performers from across Europe to the Gulbenkian Arts Centre and our beautiful Canterbury campus. All events at bOing!2021 will be performed in line with Government guidance on Covid-19. 

Watch the bOing! Festival trailer

Become a bOing! Volunteer

Follow in the paw prints of our amazing volunteers of previous years, don a pair of ears and become a bOing! Volunteer. Find out more about volunteering at bOing!

Outdoor screening 2

Gulbenkian announces FREE outdoor cinema screening for students with action-packed 80’s hit Top Gun!

The Gulbenkian Arts Centre and Gulbenkian Uncovered feel the need, the need for speed and invite you to be up there with the best of the best for a FREE, special outdoor screening of Top Gun that will Take Your Breath Away, on Tuesday 21st September during Welcome Week 2021. Adrenaline packed and incredible entertaining, Top Gun has become an iconic ’80s action film – don’t miss seeing it on the big outdoor screen on the lawn outside Gulbenkian.

Starring Tom Cruise, Kelly McGillis, Val Kilmer, and Michael Ironside, the cast is pretty good but the real stars of the film are the F-14 fighter jets, and director Tony Scott does an excellent job at capturing the intensity and excitement of the aerial manoeuvres. The soundtrack is also especially well-done, and features such hit songs as “Danger Zone” and “Take My Breath Away”, which picked up the Oscar for Best Music, Original Song.

As an outdoor event, bring a blanket, something to sit on and dress for the outdoors – we recommend dressing warmly – even bring a hot water bottle as the temperature drops.  Make yourself comfortable and settle in for an evening of film under the stars.

Bar service will be available and a range of snacks and hot food will be available to buy at the screening.

Tuesday 21st September, 7:30 pm: Student Event: Outdoor Cinema Screening – Top Gun (12A)
Gulbenkian, Gulbenkian Lawn
Tickets: Free for Students of the University of Kent as part of Welcome Week 2021
For more information and tickets please visit www.thegulbenkian.co.uk.

Hayley BACHE story image

Congratulations for Kent Hospitality Housekeeping Team

Kent Hospitality’s Housekeeping Team were delighted to award one of their team members, Hayley Blindell, with a British Association of Cleaning in Higher Education (BACHE) Highly Commended certificate last week.

The BACHE certificate recognised Hayley’s professionalism, hard work and the supportive team role which she fulfils within the university. Hayley has demonstrated this through all her seven years working at Kent, but her nomination pulled examples from the past 12 months. In this period, Hayley has repeatedly gone above and beyond by altering working patterns and being heavily relied upon to support her colleagues with the many changes that have arisen due to the pandemic.

Extracts from Hayley’s successful nomination included customer feedback such as the following:

“Please could you share with your team a massive thank you from KMMS. I understand speaking to a colleague this morning that your team were awesome! And made our Academics feel like everything was taken care of. As you can imagine assessments are a highly stressful time for both staff and students – the housekeeping team in Pears made things so easy that we did not have to fret about it.”

“We know how methodical the team are but to have this support on the day was amazing.”

Many congratulations to Hayley on her well-deserved win.

Wooden sign reads: Welcome to community garden

Kent Community Oasis Garden: Restoration volunteers needed!

The Kent Community Oasis Garden is a growing space project jointly run by the University of Kent and East Kent Mind. The garden aims to promote good mental and physical health for everyone who visits and volunteers at the space.

The project is based at the Canterbury campus on the Crab and Winkle pathway north of Parkwood. Over the past 18 months the garden has been mostly closed due to the pandemic however, we are hoping to relaunch the space in September and open it fully to students, staff and community members.

However, we need your help! We are looking for some keen new volunteers this summer to help us restore the site to a useable and maintainable growing site before the new term and there is lots to do!

If you are a looking for something to get stuck into being newly back on campus, or will be staying on site over August, we need some extra people to help us install a new rabbit proof fence, build a new composting area, and battle with the weeds!

We are open every Wednesday from 10:30am – 1:30pm where a small group of existing volunteers will be able to welcome you to the project and get you started. This is a great opportunity to get some fresh air, exercise, and meet some new people at a valuable project.

If you would like more information about the project you can visit https://blogs.kent.ac.uk/kentcog/ or email kentcog@kent.ac.uk. Please also feel free to just turn up on a Wednesday!

critical-law-tv

Critical Law TV: A unique partnership between Kent Law School students and KMTV 

Critical Law TV is a new and ground-breaking partnership between Kent Law School and KMTV, with law students producing and presenting a series of four documentaries investigating contemporary legal issues.

This exciting project offers law students the opportunity to combine their knowledge of the law with a passion for journalism.

Over a series of four episodes, students investigate the impact of contemporary legal issues within the local Kent community. Supported by Kent Law School academics, they’ve been investigating topics such as:

  • Surrogacy Law reform
  • the impact of Brexit on local businesses
  • the impact of immigration law and policy on Kent refugees
  • and the property law reforms proposed post Grenfell.

Students have been assisted by KMTV production professionals, journalists and creatives, to produce and present four documentaries for broadcast on regional and digital TV.

Critical Law TV programmes will be broadcast to around 250,000 homes in Kent and Medway on Freeview, Virgin, BT and online as well as feeding into a wider UK local television network of 13 million households.

Critical Law TV: broadcast schedule 

Watch Critical Law TV at 19.00 (BST) on:

  • Friday 6 August: Brexit and Law
  • Friday 13 August: Property Law
  • Friday 20 August: Family Law
  • Friday 27 August: Race and Law

About KMTV

KMTV is a unique partnership between KM Media Group and the University of Kent..

How to watch

  • KMTV is available on Freeview on Channel 7, with coverage across 236,800 households in Maidstone, Medway, Tunbridge Wells, Tonbridge, Sheerness, Sittingbourne and surrounding areas. KMTV broadcasts to the rest of Kent via Virgin Media Channel 159, kmtv.co.uk for On Demand and live streaming, and the KMTV app (available on both Android and iOS)
  • Download the KMTV app on the AppStore 
  • Download the KMTV Video app on Google Play

Students sat at computers

Postgraduate Week – 12-16 July 2021

The Careers and Employability Service are hosting a week of virtual employability events specifically for current Master’s and PhD students!

Running from 12-16 July, these events will focus on thinking about your next steps after your Master’s, alternative careers to academia, as well as, preparing an academic and non-academic CV, using LinkedIn to build your professional connections and more!

Events include:

  • Academic CVs
  • Interview Skills
  • Introduction to management
  • Now I have my Master’s, what next?
  • Careers in psychology for postgraduates
  • Introduction to the Civil Service Fast Stream
  • Alternative careers to academia for MRes and PhD students (LSSJ and HSS)

Visit the PG Week webpage to view the full programme and book into an event.

Laptop computer with hands in front

Release of exam results

The following message is being sent out to students expecting their exam results to be published from 1 July. We apologise for the delay in letting you know and for any additional worry this may have caused.

From Professor Richard Reece | Deputy Vice-Chancellor Education and Student Experience

We are pleased to inform you that we have completed all undergraduate finalist and diploma Boards of Examiners’ considerations and are now processing and updating your marks in KentVision ready to release your results.

Your results should be with you early next week and you will receive an email (to your Kent email address) once they are ready.

We recognise that you will have been hoping to receive your results from today onwards, and that a further wait may cause you some anxiety. However, we hope that you will understand the importance of ensuring that you receive the correct results taking into account this year’s no detriment measures.

Thank you for your continued patience.

Richard

Professor Richard Reece | Deputy Vice-Chancellor Education and Student Experience

LGBTQIA+ letters written in the colours of the rainbow on closed fingers on hands pressed together

Pride Month – Supporting our LGBTQIA+ Community at Kent

Around the world, June is recognised as LGBTQIA+ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, Intersex, and Asexual) Pride Month to commemorate a tipping point in queer human rights history — the Stonewall Riots uprising. Find out more about Pride Month.

As a part of Pride Month we wanted to highlight the many LGBTQIA+ groups and networks at the University.

Find out more about our LGBTQIA+ Community at Kent:

Harassment reporting

We fully support and encourage all our students and staff to report incidents of racism, harassment and discrimination.  This is through INK for Students or the Reporting Tool for Staff. Students needing additional support during particularly difficult times are also welcomed to contact Student Support & Wellbeing

For allies

We recognise that it can be challenging to know how to support other members of our community facing discrimination and harassment or speaking out when we witness or hear transphobia. We want to encourage all students to stand and be an ally of the LGBT+ community. Here are some tips on how to be an ally to the community, no matter your gender identity or sexuality:

  1. Be open to learning about the adversity faced by LGBTQIA+ people
    Educating yourself, and learning about the difficulties faced by those within the community is an important part of being an ally. By being open to listen and learn about the problems, we can better understand the importance of pride month, and can in turn become a better ally.
  2. Understand our own privileges
    By understanding our own privileges, we are able to become more aware of certain things we don’t need to think about purely because of the way we were born. It can help us to better empathise with groups like the LGBTQIA+ community.
  3. Familiarise yourself with the correct language
    Making sure to use the correct terminology and being respectful is vital to being a good ally. If you are unsure of someone’s pronouns or label, ask them respectfully. Stonewall have put together a helpful glossary.
  4. Stand up against discrimination or hateful language
    Of course, we should all fight back against any discrimination we encounter, but often this can be intimidating, especially when the hateful language is spoken by a friend or family member. Correcting those around us when they may harm the LGBTQIA+ community is vital, as we must all hold each other to account for our actions and words. We encourage everyone to stand up for those that may be marginalised in society, and remind others that there is no room for hateful or discriminatory language or actions.

Find out more about being an ally

Access resources

Using the resources available removes the burden of questions, explanations and discussions from members of the LGBTQIA+ community – the links below are an excellent starting point for people wanting to understand more.

Our LGBT+ network have a fantastic blog that covers ongoing news, events and challenges – stay up to date with the issues affecting the community.

Mermaids UK and Stonewall have easily accessible resources and Q&A that cover many of the relevant issues.

For more information and support please visit LGBTQ+ webpages.

Find out more about the University of Kent’s commitment to creating and supporting a balanced, inclusive and diverse community.

Pride Month - Neon light in the shape of a heart in the colours of the rainbow set against a wall

Pride Month – Supporting our trans and non-binary students at Kent

At the University of Kent, we are committed to fostering a positive environment where all students and staff are treated fairly, with dignity, courtesy, respect and consideration. All of us have a responsibility to create an environment that is free from harassment, bullying, unlawful discrimination and victimisation.

In recent years, the trans and non-binary community has become more visible in society and the public eye. We have been pleased to see increased awareness of the diversity of the trans community and increased understanding of the breadth of gender identities. Unfortunately, this increased visibility has come with increased hostility towards some members of the trans community.

Trans and non-binary people face discrimination and harassment:

  • At work, including from colleagues, managers, customers and clients;
  • In public, including verbal and physical abuse;
  • Online, particularly on social media where targeted harassment, bullying and abusive comments and even attempts to find and share trans people’s previous names and current address are increasingly common;
  • They also face barriers to accessing healthcare, such as long waiting lists for treatment, and  transphobia.

Recent news events and discussions related to Stonewall have amplified the discussion, particularly online, and we have published our response to this confirming our continued membership of Stonewall. This response underlines our commitment to freedom of speech, academic freedom, and inclusion, which are all University values.

For members of our trans, nonbinary and intersex communities

Gender neutral toilets

We recognise that this is a particular concern for trans members of our community, and we have maps of both our Canterbury and Medway campuses highlighting the location of gender neutral toilets.

Harassment reporting

We fully support and encourage all our students and staff to report incidents of racism, harassment and discrimination.  This is through INK for Students or the Reporting Tool for staff. Students needing additional support during particularly difficult times are also welcomed to contact Student Support & Wellbeing

Join our communities:

Access resources

Using the resources available removes the burden of questions, explanations and discussions from members of the LGBTQIA+ community – the links below are an excellent starting point for people wanting to understand more.

Our LGBT+ network have a fantastic blog that covers ongoing news, events and challenges – stay up to date with the issues affecting the community.

Mermaids UK and Stonewall have easily accessible resources and Q&A that cover many of the relevant issues.

For more information and support please visit LGBTQ+ webpages.

Find out more about the University of Kent’s commitment to creating and supporting a balanced, inclusive and diverse community.

Pride collage

Why is Pride important to you?

To mark Pride Month, LGBTQ+ staff and student networks at University of Kent posed the question ‘Why is Pride important to you?’ Along with their answers, members submitted pictures that made them think of pride. These pictures have been turned into the eye-catching Pride Collage above.

Why is Pride important to you?

“Pride is important to be because it makes me feel visible, included, and part of something bigger”

“The LGBT+ community is one of the most diverse, all-embracing, inclusive communities on the planet. The + is very important. The ability to self-define and still be accepted is a fundamental part of this community, which is what makes it so very special. And it’s not just about who’s allowed in; it’s about the support once you arrive. We look after each other, support each other, and use discrimination against us as fuel to support other minoritised groups”

“Pride Month is when I feel closest to my community. Wherever I am, knowing that the core nature of this community is to protect its own and speak its truth gives me a sense of balance and belonging”

“Pride comes in many different colours, and the LGBT+ community covers many different communities, some more marginalized than others”

“I am not proud because I am gay – I was born gay; I’m proud because I’m not afraid any more”

“When I think of Pride, the first word that comes to me is ‘freedom’. Freedom of being who I am, how I look like and what I wear, what I believe in, and who I love. Unfortunately too many people around the world still don’t have such freedoms, so having a month to celebrate and reflect on the meaning of Pride is still very important, even in 2021”

“Pride is important to me because for the other 364 days of the year, I find it hard to be proud”

“As an ally, Pride to me is a reminder of my privilege and that the rights of LGBT+ friends, family and colleagues are far from being won. Pride to me is an ongoing effort to make sure I do all I can to recognise and fight against inequality and to call out injustice, standing side by side with the LGBT+ community with respect and friendship”

“Pride to me never used to mean much, apart from a nice day out and lots of rainbows. That was before I was out as a pansexual/queer person. Now, on the other hand, pride is so incredibly important to me. It is important because it is genuinely the ONLY time and place where I can hold my partner’s hand and not feel worried about harassment and stares. It is the ONLY place where I can feel like I am ‘normal’ and a part of the majority, and nobody will judge me. I don’t think anyone can really understand this without experiencing years of ‘coming out’ in every possible social situation. It also makes me so happy to see younger generations at Pride festivals and in Pride month just being visible and being who they are, in a way that was never possible when I was that age. I enjoy being a role model and making sure that generations to come can feel proud to be who they are and know that they are not alone”

“For me, Pride is a time to reflect on the progress we’ve made thanks to the work of queer heroes, and recognise that there’s still so much to do. I don’t always feel comfortable expressing who I am, but Pride allows me to celebrate – even if it is in very small ways!”

“To me, Pride is radical. It is self-acceptance; it is rejecting the voices that define you as ‘less than’. It is a celebration AND a fight… and there are still lots to fight for. We can only be proud if we stand with and for one another.”

For more information about the LGBTQ+ community at Kent visit the LGBTQ+ webpages.