KSA featured in ‘Questions of Space: Festival of Ideas’ Short Film

Canterbury Cathedral hosted ‘Questions of Space: A Festival of Ideas’ which took place on 20 & 21 June 2016. This included a series of public talks, walks, sights and sounds. The Festival of Ideas is a partnership between Canterbury Cathedral and the University of Kent.

Below is an eight minute documentary about the project, shot and edited by Stacie Lee Bennett.

As part of the Festival, staff and a PhD student from KSA hosted their own events at the Cathedral:

Richard Watkins
Hot Air
Experiment
The vast spaces of Canterbury Cathedral hold 100 tonnes of air, continually moving and sometimes creating draughts. Using helium balloons to see where the air goes, we aim to find out how to improve air flow.

Carolina Vasilikou
Thermal Delight
Walk & Exhibition
Thermal qualities – warm, cool, humid, airy, radiant, cosy – are an important part of how we experience space. This walk invites you to help measure and test the different sensory qualities across Cathedral spaces and precincts to understand how they make us feel and why.

Gordana Fontana-Giusti
Bird’s Eye View
Exhibition & Talk
We will be delving into the archives to discover Christopher Packe, who in the 1700s climbed Bell Harry Tower to get a “bird’s-eye view” of East Kent and, with the help of his theodolite (an instrument for taking precise measurements) created a new kind of map.

Tim Fox-Godden
Ypres to Canterbury
Exhibition & Talk
This exhibition is about how we commemorate war thought architecture and monuments. A huge panoramic photograph taken at Buffs Road Cemetery in Ypres, France, brings feelings of loss and sacrifice at the Western Front to Canterbury Cathedral Bastian Chapel.

 

KSA Staff and Students taking part in ‘Questions of Space: A Festival of Ideas’

Canterbury Cathedral is hosting ‘Questions of Space: A Festival of Ideas’ which will be running on the 20 & 21 June 2016. This will include a series of public talks, walks, sights and sounds. The Festival of Ideas is a partnership between Canterbury Cathedral and the University of Kent.

As part of the Festival, staff and a PhD student from KSA will be hosting their own events at the Cathedral:

Richard Watkins
Hot Air
Experiment
The vast spaces of Canterbury Cathedral hold 100 tonnes of air, continually moving and sometimes creating draughts. Using helium balloons to see where the air goes, we aim to find out how to improve air flow.

Carolina Vasilikou
Thermal Delight
Walk & Exhibition
Thermal qualities – warm, cool, humid, airy, radiant, cosy – are an important part of how we experience space. This walk invites you to help measure and test the different sensory qualities across Cathedral spaces and precincts to understand how they make us feel and why.

Gordana Fontana-Giusti
Bird’s Eye View
Exhibition & Talk
We will be delving into the archives to discover Christopher Packe, who in the 1700s climbed Bell Harry Tower to get a “bird’s-eye view” of East Kent and, with the help of his theodolite (an instrument for taking precise measurements) created a new kind of map.

Tim Fox-Godden
Ypres to Canterbury
Exhibition & Talk
This exhibition is about how we commemorate war thought architecture and monuments. A huge panoramic photograph taken at Buffs Road Cemetery in Ypres, France, brings feelings of loss and sacrifice at the Western Front to Canterbury Cathedral Bastian Chapel.

For full details, including all the events and booking information, please visit: www.kent.ac.uk/publicengagement/questions-of-space.html

PhD Student Tim Fox-Godden wins Gail Braybon Prize for Best Postgraduate Paper

PhD Student Tim Fox-Godden won the Gail Braybon Prize for Best Postgraduate Paper at the 8th Conference of the International Society for First World War Studies; the conference was entitled ‘Landscapes of War’ and was held in September 2015 in Trento, Italy.

The paper, ‘Sites of Memory Beyond Mourning?’ looks at narratives of memory contained within the architecture of the British war cemeteries along the former Western Front of the First World War. The traditional interpretation of these sites has been one centred on the commemoration of the dead and whilst this is important it is not the only layer of memory. The paper, based on Tim’s PhD research, explores one of these other layers of memory; specifically, the relationship between the cemetery architecture and the landscape of the Great War. Using a case study of a cluster of cemeteries on the Franco-Belgian border the paper identifies a design typology in the relationship between the architecture and the wartime landscape. In doing so it highlights the layer of memory that retains the geometries and features of the battlefields that would otherwise be lost.

Dr Timothy Brittain-Catlin and Tim Fox-Godden to speak at the Graduate Student Research Forum

The third annual Graduate Student Research Forum, hosted by the Society of Architectural Historians of Great Britain is being held on Saturday, 11th April 2015 at the University of Edinburgh. Dr Timothy Brittain-Catlin from the Kent School of Architecture has been invited to speak as part of a group of experienced practitioners, based on his recent book, Bleak Houses: Disappointment and Failure in Architecture, about alternative ways of writing architectural history. Joining him, will be one of our postgraduate students, Tim Fox-Godden, who will be presenting his research on ‘Sites of Memory Beyond Mourning? Remembrance and place in the war cemeteries of the old Western Front’.

Included in the panel of expert practitioners are Richard Anderson (University of Edinburgh), Kathryn Ferry (Freelance writer and scholar), Hannah Malone (Magdalene College, University of Cambridge), Chris Miele (Montagu Evans) and Olivia Horsfall Turner (V&A + RIBA Architecture Partnership), all of whom have vast experience in the fields of architectural history, conservation, and curatorship.

The practitioners will participate in panel discussions based on each postgraduate student’s ten minute presentations about their topic of research in a sequence of ‘Lightning Round’ talks. The idea of the Forum is to break away from the traditional conference atmosphere, and to create a lively and responsive environment where students, academics and professionals can freely discuss and exchange relevant knowledge and experience. To close the event, there will be a keynote address by Professor Iain Boyd Whyte from the University of Edinburgh.

For more information, please visit: http://www.sahgb.org.uk/graduate-student-research-forum.html