CASE Open Lecture: Tim Stonor, Space Syntax

The next CASE Open Lecture will be given by Tim Stonor, Managing Director of Space Syntax, with his talk titled, ‘Space Syntax: a Smart City approach to urban planning and design’ on Tuesday 19th November at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Tim Stonor is an architect and urban planner who has devoted his career to the analysis and design of human behaviour patterns – the ways in which people move, interact and transact in buildings and urban places. He is an internationally recognised expert in the design of spatial layouts and, in particular, the role of space in the generation of social, economic and environmental value. Tim is the Managing Director of Space Syntax, an urban planning and design company created at University College London in 1989 to develop and apply predictive design technologies. He is Director of The Academy of Urbanism, a Visiting Professor at The Bartlett School of Architecture, UCL, a Harvard Loeb Fellow and Deputy Chair of the UK Design Council.

Space Syntax: a Smart City approach to urban planning and design

The spatial layout of the buildings and urban places exerts a powerful influence on human behaviour. The way that people move, interact and transact is directly influenced by the way that places connect as networks of space.

The science-based and human-focused approach developed by Space Syntax aids the planning and design process by identifying the fundamental links between spatial layout, land use attraction and the performance of places.

In his talk, Tim will describe the way that Space Syntax has used data, algorithms and predictive analytics over thirty years of international planning and design practice.

Upcoming Digital Architecture Open Lecture: Christopher Leung, The Bartlett School of Architecture

The next Digital Architecture open lecture will be given by Dr Christopher Leung from The Bartlett School of Architecture with his talk titled, ‘Digital fabrication: Dialogue through manufacturing processes’ on Tuesday 12 February at 6pm in Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1.

Architects have become accustomed to designing the physical fabric of buildings using digital tools. However, in an age of advanced manufacturing where there are possibilities enabled by the adoption of robotics and automation that are now widely available to architectural practice, architects are increasingly designing processes as much as components and assemblies. In this shift, architects can have a role to “Design for” aspects of these processes, where a given process can be for “Assembly”, “Disassembly” or “Measurement” to name a few.

Reflecting on the “Design for” considerations found in other industries such as automotive and aerospace, this lecture surveys a selection of the possibilities now afforded by digital fabrication and considers the implication for design options at the interface between digital representation and processes of making. These are presented through a series of case-study projects that have been carried out in collaboration with other educators, researchers and industry practitioners as well as current work at the Bartlett.

Christopher Leung trained as an architect at the Bartlett with experience in architectural and environmental design practice. He completed his engineering doctorate at UCL on passive variable performance facades. He is the programme director of the Masters in Design for Manufacture at UCL Here East, the new centre dedicated to making based at Stratford in east London.

He has worked on government-funded research projects into low-energy building technology, proof-of-concept build projects and post-doc research on the environmental evaluation of bio-receptive concrete. He has taught at the Bartlett in the Interactive Architecture Lab, BiotA Lab and the M.Sc in Architectural computation. He also carries out research into solar activated materials including bi-metals and shape memory alloys for novel applications in the facades of buildings to improve energy performance in collaboration with leading industry partners.

All welcome!