Historic Building Services Symposium featured in CIBSE Journal

A symposium held at the Chartered Institute of Building Services Engineers (CIBSE) on 25 July 2018, organised by Dr Henrik Schoenefeldt in collaboration with CIBSE Heritage Group has been featured in an article in the September issue of CIBSE Journal, written by Liza Young, Deputy Editor. To read the full article, please see here: http://portfolio.cpl.co.uk/CIBSE/201809/28/.

The symposium, ‘Historic Building Services in Education, Practice and Research’, explored the value of studying historic building services and how it can inform the practice and education of building service engineers today. Through talks and discussions, the event provided a forum for practitioners, engineers and educators to investigate these questions. Speakers and panel chairs included Professor Dean Hawkes, University of Cambridge, Dr Neil Sturrock, Chairman of CIBSE Heritage Group, Caroline Cattini, Historic England, Phil Jones, Chairman of CIBSE CHP & District Heating Group, Dr Henrik Schoenefeldt, University of Kent, Andrew More, Senior Building Services Engineer, Historic England.

Kent School of Architecture MSc Architecture and Sustainable Environment students, and CASE (Centre for Architecture and the Sustainable Environment) PhD students presented their work at the event, in addition to a PhD student from Cardiff University.

MASE students present at Cambridge Conference

Seven students from the MSc in Architecture and Sustainable Environment presented papers at the 5th Annual Conference of the Construction History Society, which was held at Queens College, Cambridge on 6 and 7 April 2018. The focus of this year’s conference was on the history of building services and its relationship to the development of construction technology. It was an international conference with delegates from countries across the world, including Australia, US, Switzerland, Germany, Belgium, Bulgaria, Sweden and France.

The students’ papers were based on research they have undertaken in the context of the module AR828 Rediscovery under the supervision of Dr Henrik Schoenefeldt. It is a specialist module on the history of environmental technologies within the MSc. In this modules students undertake research in the history of building services, which included  detailed case studies on the original environmental principles underlying the design of historic buildings.

The conference gave students the opportunity to gain important skills required in academic research, such as the writing of papers, going through the peer-review process, speaking to larger audiences about their work or taking part in plenary discussions, which involved dealing with critical comments or challenges questions from delegates or panel chairs.

Cover of Conference Proceedings

Seven peer-reviewed papers were published in ‚Studies in the History of Services and Construction, The Proceedings of the Fifth Conference of the Construction History Society, Queen‘s College, Cambridge, 6-8 April  2018 (Cambridge: CHS, 2018)

The engagement of students in the conference forms part of initiatives that Dr Schoenefeldt has been leading in conjunction with his National Teaching Fellowship Award and ‚Between Heritage and Sustainability‘, a research project funded through the Arts and Humanities Research Council.

Dr Schoenefeldt giving opening keynote lecture at Queen’s College, Cambridge

Dr Schoenefeldt gave the opening keynote lecture of the conference and acted as chair the main building services stream.  His lecture, which was entitled ‚Towards a History of Building Services’ explored the relationship between construction and building services in the design of the Palace of Westminster.

MSc Architecture and the Sustainable Environment – Student Profile – Adebukola Adepeju

What attracted you to studying at Kent?
The University of Kent consistently ranks highly in the UK and its young and vibrant School of Architecture is one of the UK’s top ten.

Before taking a place on the programme, what was your previous area of study?
I studied Architecture for my first degree back home before coming to Kent.

Are you enjoying life on campus? Also, what would you recommend about the city of Canterbury to those that have never visited the area before.
I’m thankful for the campus environment- physical, academic and social. Everyone seems always ready to help. The campus is beautiful and safe and its vantage location within Canterbury makes everywhere I want to go easily accessible. Also, living in Woolf with all the facilities makes life easy. There are lots of international students here hence lots of activities from the different nationalities. It’s always good to learn a thing or two from other backgrounds.
Although Canterbury is relatively small, I love that it is such as historic city with one of the most beautiful Cathedrals in the world. I love that it is not noisy or overcrowded which perfectly suits me! It has a number of historic places like the Heritage museum and Marlowe Theatre. Movie and Film/Play enthusiasts like me can always catch the latest at the Gulbenkian on campus. There is also lots of lush green parks and gardens for lovers of nature and outdoors and the buildings around here are also very interesting and each one is uniquely different from the other especially the ones here on campus!

What has been the highlight of the course so far?
The learning environment here is so different from where I come from especially in terms of course structure and the feedback process but its nothing I couldn’t adapt to quickly. The staff have been very supportive so that has helped me a lot. Also, there are a variety of nationalities on my programme so it’s interesting to learn a thing or two about their respective backgrounds.

After you finish your studies, what would you like to do next?
After school, I definitely want to go back to practice, I had worked back home before commencing my studies last September.