Timothy Brittain-Catlin at the London Festival of Architecture

Timothy Brittain-Catlin will be appearing again at events during London Festival of Architecture, this year acting as chairman at two contrasting discussion evenings. Both events are planned by long-term supporters of Kent School of Architecture and Planning (KSAP) in the professional world. The first, which takes place on 6th June, is hosted by Proctor & Matthews at the Oxo Tower, and takes the form of a debate entitled From Boundaries to Belvederes. The discussion, with the participation of Dr Husam AlWaer, Senior Lecturer in Sustainable Urban Design and Evaluation, University of Dundee and Mark Newman, Archaeological Consultant, National Trust North Region, will focus on the definition of settlement edges, articulating the importance of the interface between public and private realms and identifying the thresholds between an inner inhabited and domesticated world and the wild landscape beyond.

The second event, Style Wars, will be a lively discussion on 26th June at the offices of Donald Insall & Associates about the use and meaning of style in architecture today, and it will complement the discussion on a similar theme held at KSAP at the end of last year. The speakers will be the architects Charles Holland, Amin Taha, and Tanvir Hasan, the lead director of Insall’s London office, as well as the architectural historian John Goodall, author of The English Castle and architectural editor of Country Life.

Timothy Brittain-Catlin chairs Spaces of Memory, Spaces of Heritage

Timothy Brittain-Catlin chaired a distinguished panel of conservation activists on Wednesday 20th June at an event hosted by the Romanian Cultural Institute as part of the London Festival of Architecture. The panel comprised the architect, writer and conservation pioneer Sherban Cantacuzino; the philanthropist and founder of the Pro Patrimonio Foundation Nicolae Ratiu; the author and conservation activist Jessica Douglas-Home; and the award-winning architect Vlad Sebastian Rusu, and the discussion was held to accompany the current exhibition of a number of fascinating recent conservation projects at the Institute.

Sherban Cantacuzino related the history of the newly restored early nineteenth-century vernacular cottage where the composer George Enescu had been born, and Jessica Douglas-Home talked about the work of the Mihai Eminescu Trust, including the beautiful fortified church at Alma Vii in Transylvania. The Cultural Palace in Blaj, restored by Vlad Sebastian Rusu, has just been awarded this year’s EU Prize for Cultural Heritage / Europa Nostra Awards in the Conservation category. The evening attracted a large crowd and was attended by HRH Prince Nicholas of Romania.

Image: Left to right, Dorian Branea, director of the Romanian Cultural Institute; Nicolae Ratiu; Sherban Cantacuzino; Timothy Brittain-Catlin; Jessica Douglas-Home; Vlad Sebastian Rusu.