AHRC CDP Studentship with the National Maritime Museum

The standard tuition fees and stipend (maintenance grant) will be paid by the AHRC to the award holder subject to the eligibility criteria outlined by them. The AHRC stipend for 2018/19 is £14,777 (full-time, pro-rata for part-time) plus an additional stipend of £500 for Collaborative Doctoral Students.

Project Title: The Royal Observatory, Greenwich, and its networks of support and influence, 1675-1742

We seek applications from outstanding postgraduate students for this collaborative doctoral award, starting in September 2018. This project aims to develop a new approach to the institutional history of the Royal Observatory, Greenwich. Using the Observatory as a central hub, it proposes to explore the local, national and international networks of astronomy, practical mathematics, navigation, education, print and instrument making that supported its work and developing reputation. It will focus on the period of the first two Astronomers Royal, John Flamsteed and Edmond Halley, aiming to better understand the role, milieu and development of this key institution in its foundational years.

This research will draw on work on geographies of knowledge, material culture and book history in order to gain a fuller picture of contexts in which mathematical and instrumental knowledge was developed and used. The project will make use of a range of archival sources and object, book and image collections, especially those of the NMM.

The student will have the opportunity to enhance the Museum’s cataloguing and interpretation within public programming and displays, and to feed into the development of plans for the 350th anniversary of the Royal Observatory (2025-26), which forms part of the NMM (collectively, with The Queen’s House and Cutty Sark, known as Royal Museums Greenwich). They will also be able to contribute to Dr Higgitt’s research project, Metropolitan Science: Places, Objects and Cultures of Knowledge and Practice in London, 1600-1800, in partnership with the Science Museum.

Criteria

Applicants should have: a First Class or Upper Second Class Honours degree in an appropriate discipline; a masters degree in an appropriate discipline, although applicants who do not hold a masters degree will be considered if they can demonstrate sustained and relevant experience and meet the criteria outlined in the AHRC guidelines.

Candidates must meet the AHRC’s academic criteria and eligibility criteria:  https://www.ukri.org/funding/information-for-award-holders/grant-terms-and-conditions

For further details, please contact Dr Rebekah Higgitt: R.Higgitt@kent.ac.uk

To apply for the scholarship please see the Scholarships website here: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/search/FN05AHRCNM02

Deadline

21 May 2018

AHRC PhD Studentships

The Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies is delighted to announce TWO FULLY FUNDED AHRC PhD STUDENTSHIPS to work on the topic of relations between sixteenth century England and Scotland. The successful students will be jointly supervised between Kent and the British Library, and have the contribution to contribute to a major British Library exhibition on relations between Elizabeth I and Mary, Queen of Scots. Links to details of these studentships (one on early and one on late sixteenth-century Anglo-Scots relations) and how to apply are below:

AHRC Studentship -Elizabeth I and Mary Queen of Scots: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/search/FNADAHRCEL02

AHRC CHASE Studentship – Anglo-Scottish Relations In The Early Sixteenth Century: https://www.kent.ac.uk/scholarships/search/FNADAHRCAN02

Please contact Dr Amy Blakeway, the Kent supervisor, for more details, on a.l.blakeway@kent.ac.uk

Lecture by our own Dr Emily Guerry on ‘The Wall Paintings of the Sainte-Chapelle’, 8 February, 7.00pm

You are warmly invited to a lecture by our own Dr Emily Guerry on ‘The Wall Paintings of the Sainte-Chapelle’, Thursday 8 February at the Old Library, Kent College

This fascinating talk should interest anyone who is interested in medieval history or art history – as well as lovers of Paris. The Sainte-Chapelle is just a few steps away from Notre Dame, hidden away in the Palace of Justice. It was built for King Louis IX in about 1241 to 1248 to house his collection of religious relics and has been described as one of the most beautiful buildings on earth. Its interior is dominated by 15 huge stained glass windows but, as Dr Guerry will explain, every inch of the remaining wall surface and the vault was also richly painted and decorated with remarkable images, patterns and motifs.

If you have any questions please contact canterburyha@gmail.com.

History at Kent Day 2017: Essay Competition

Thanks to everyone that entered our essay competition following our recent History at Kent Day. Entrants were required to write 200 words on ‘Who do you think is the most influential figure in history?’, and we received some fantastic entries!

We very much enjoyed reading all the essays, and found it very difficult to select our winners, who are listed below:

1st prize, £100 Amazon vouchers

Andrew Phipps who wrote about Edward Jenner

2nd prize, £50 Amazon vouchers

Ben Warwick who wrote about Robert J. Oppenheimer

3rd prize, £25 Amazon vouchers

Sam Pruszewicz who wrote about Lt Col Stanislav Petrov

To everyone that entered – you will all receive a small gift in the post to say thank you for entering!