Category Archives: Exhibitions

Beautifully Obscene: Concert, Talks and Tours

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After a fantastic opening night, we are thrilled to announce our season of events for Beautifully Obscene.

All events are free and will be held in Studio 3 Gallery. As space is limited, we would ask that you book tickets to ensure your place.

Please note, this exhibition contains very graphic of a sexual nature and may not be suitable for all audiences.

#EarBox: Operatic Arias

#EarBox, Studio 3’s collaboration with the Music Department, returns for a third time. In this instalment the University Music Scholars will take the audience on a journey through the tempestuous world of love and lust at the opera including arias by Mozart, Gluck, Dvorack and Saint-Saens.

May 27th, 13:10 PM

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/earbox-operatic-arias-tickets-17042001084

Student-led Exhibition Tours

Beautifully Obscene has been curated by students from our History of Art department. Join us for a tour and hear them discuss both key works in the exhibition, and their experiences of curating this show.

May 27th, 14:00-15:00

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/beautifully-obscene-exhibition-tour-tickets-17041785439

June 3rd, 15:00 – 16:00

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/beautifully-obscene-exhibition-tour-tickets-17041798478

Beautifully Obscene: Lectures

“Beautifully Obscene: Shunga in Focus”

Louise Boyd, PhD Candidate, University of Glasgow

Do you want to know more about the artists who created shunga and how it relates to the rest of their work? Or do you wonder who bought shunga and why? Come along to learn more about the beauty and humour of the prints on display, and hear about how shunga was created, cherished, and occasionally censored in Edo Japan. There will also be the opportunity for questions.

June 5th, 13:00 – 14:00

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/beautifully-obscene-shunga-in-focus-tickets-17066893538

“Beautifully Obscene: Uses of the Erotic and Pornographic in Feminist Film”

Sara Janssen, PhD Candidate, University of Kent

Taking the paradoxical conjunction of “beautifully obscene” as a starting point, this talk will discuss the troubled relationship between feminism, erotic art, and pornography. I will discuss some of the issues feminists have raised against the representation of the female body and female sexuality in erotic art and pornography, as well as arguments that have been brought to the fore in favour of an appropriation of erotic art and pornography in order affirm female sexual agency. Discussing different examples of feminist art film as well as recent examples of alternative pornography, this talk highlights the central role of female sexuality in feminist theory and art from the 1960s to the present day.

June 8th, 15:00 – 16:00

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/beautifully-obscene-uses-of-the-erotic-pornographic-in-feminist-film-tickets-17042702181

Coming Soon – Beautifully Obscene: The History of the Erotic Print

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Beautifully Obscene: The History of the Erotic Print

15th May – 12th June, 2015

Private View: 15th of May, 2015, 6 PM – 8 PM

Studio 3 Gallery is pleased to present Beautifully Obscene: The History of the Erotic Print. Featuring over 50 works from across Europe and Japan and spanning the course of 500 years, the exhibition incorporates the different approaches used by artists in order to explore themes of sexuality, gender roles and power.

The show explores Sir Kenneth Clark’s famous distinction between the socially-acceptable ‘nude’, and the socially-pejorative ‘naked’ body, with the majority of the works included arguably belonging to the latter category. Beautifully Obscene will not only present viewers with a comprehensive study of the aesthetics of the human form and sexuality, but will also challenge our deeply ingrained discomfort with erotic visual representations, and suggest that beauty can in fact be found in the obscene.

Prints have historically been affordable ways to rapidly and economically reproduce and disseminate images, and this has created a rich legacy of erotic art. As well as showing how these themes have evolved across centuries and continents, this exhibition will also document how the viewers’ relationship to the image has shifted over time. Many of the older examples in the show come from books or pamphlets where they could be viewed intimately and privately. More recent and contemporary works were intended to be shown in a gallery setting, so expand the scale of the body, confronting the viewer directly.

The featured artists have represented motifs such as the classical nude of Western Antiquity, modern French eroticism, through to the 30 explicit prints of 18th and 19th century Japanese Shunga, and contemporary meditations on the human form and sexuality. This exhibition explores what we reveal and what we conceal, and the hidden educational and religious connotations that the erotic can harbor. It questions societal fears of the explicit and the pornographic, tackling themes of sexuality, gender and the role of the erotic in a diverse range of cultures and eras.

The exhibition will include works from Pietro Aquila, Pietro Santi Bartoli, Monika Beisner, Jan de Bisschop, Emma Bradford, Simone Cantarini, Stephen Chambers, Marianne Clouzot, Gabriel Dauchot, Angele Delasalle, Roland Delcol ,Amandine Dore, Tracey Emin, Brad Faine, Henri Fantin-Latour, Valentin Le Fevre, Ian Hamilton Finlay, Othon Friesz, Frans de Geetre, Paul Guiramand, Sarah Hardacre, William Hogarth, Katsushika Hokusai, Anita Klein, Rudolf Koch, Antonio Lafrery, Martin Van Maele , Albert Marquet, Henri Matisse, Patricia Nik-Dad, Pablo Picasso, André Provot, Felicien Rops, Berthommé de Saint-André, Kitagawa Utamaro, Alex Varenne, Marcel Vertes , Denis Volx, Lucas Vorsterman, and Shane Wheatcroft.

This exhibition has been organised by students from the Print Collecting and Curating Module at the University of Kent’s School of Arts. This course gives students the opportunity both to curate a museum-quality exhibition of their design and to acquire prints for the Kent Print Collection. In thinking about this exhibition, this year’s students wished to address the lack of erotic art in the permanent collection and to explore the rich and varied history of sensuality and eroticism depicted in print.

For more information and updates, follow our Facebook event page.

PALINDROME: Q&A WITH IAN MASSEY, BRIAN RICE AND RICHARD ROME

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Studio 3 Gallery is delighted to announce that artists Brian Rice and Richard Rome will be in conversation with the curator, writer and expert on British art, Ian Massey on 26 February. This is a great opportunity for lovers of 1960s art to hear more about the art on display in our current exhibition Palindrome: The Sixties Art of Brian Rice and Richard Rome.

Refreshments will be available from 17:30, and the talk will begin at 18:00.

Tickets are free, but booking is recommended due to the limited capacity of the gallery. Please book your place here: https://eventbrite.co.uk/event/15651255326/

 

#EARBOX: a Studio 3 and Music Department Collaboration

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We are very excited to be launching #EarBox, a new collaboration between the School of Arts’ Studio 3 Gallery and the Music Department.

#EarBox is a series of events exploring the meeting-point between visual art and music, where visitors can experience the latest Studio 3 exhibition, or listen to the unfolding musical performance – or wander the new emotional landscape mapped by the intersection of art and music, where the experience of one medium informs and influences a response to the other.

For our first event, visit Palindrome, our new exhibition of the 1960’s paintings of Brian Rice and sculptures of Richard Rome while Daniel Harding, Deputy Director of Music, performs piano works by Philip Glass, Erik Satie, John Cage and Amy Beach.

Event Details:

Wednesday January 28th, 13:00

 Studio 3 Gallery, Jarman Building, University of Kent, Canterbury, CT2 7UG

Admission to all these events is free; make sure you’re following @Unikent_music or @Studio3Gallery for event details, or visit the Music department’s What’s On or the Studio 3 blog page from early January to find out what’s coming.

Talk: An Evening with Rose Hilton

rosehiltontalk

You are warmly invited to join us on Wednesday November 26th for a conversation between Rose Hilton and curator Dr Ben Thomas.

The pair will discuss our current exhibition that features 26 of Hilton’s lyrical, sensitive and joyful canvases including recent landscapes, still-lifes, interiors and nudes, as well as key works from earlier in the artist’s career, such as the poignant Roger’s Room (1973) depicting her late husband, the artist Roger Hilton.

Refreshments will be available from 17:30, and the talk will begin at 18:00.

Tickets are free, but booking is recommended due to the limited capacity of the gallery. Please book your place here:http://ow.ly/Dds7b

Upcoming Exhibition: Rose Hilton, Giving Life to Painting

Blue Cafe low res

Studio 3 Gallery at the University of Kent is pleased to present Giving Life to Painting a new major exhibition of works by Rose Hilton. Featuring over twenty-five pieces, these works exemplify Hilton’s sensitive and empathic use of colour and form to capture the intangible sensibilities of her landscape and her models.

 Hilton was born in Leigh, near Tonbridge, and grew up there as part of a strict Plymouth Brethren family. She studied art at Beckenham School of Art, and then at the Royal College of Art, where she was part of a brilliant generation of students including Robyn Denny, Richard Smith, David Hockney, Joe Tilson. She married the painter Roger Hilton in 1965 and moved with him to Cornwall, where she has lived ever since, forming part of the well-known St. Ives school. This exhibition marks Hilton’s return to her home county of Kent and will be held in conjunction with a parallel exhibition at Messum’s Gallery in London.

Exhibition dates: September 29 to December 19

Private View: Saturday October 4, 18:00 to 20:00

Open Monday to Friday, 9:00 to 17:00

 Image: Rose Hilton, Blue Café, 2007, oil on canvas, courtesy of Messum’s Gallery http://www.messums.com/

 

Student Review: UNDEREXPOSED – A Tribute to Female Artists

We are please to launch a new series of articles written by our History and Philosophy of Art students in response to our current exhibitions. This inaugural entry comes from Nigel Ip, a second-year HPA student, whose particular Art History interests include the Italian Renaissance, the Pre-Raphaelites and Conceptual Art. You can find more of his writing here: http://nigelartreviews.wordpress.com/.

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UNDEREXPOSED: A Tribute to Female Artists

Nigel Ip

In the space of ten seconds, how many female artists can you think of?

Now repeat the same exercise but with male artists…

Off the top of my head I counted four female artists – Artemisia Gentileschi, Barbara Hepworth, Marina Abramović and Tracey Emin – and about seven male artists – Raphael, Michelangelo, Velázquez, Damien Hirst, Rubens, Leonardo da Vinci and Picasso.

You can do the same exercise over and over again and still find more male artists than their counterparts.

Female artists in general have been under-represented throughout art history. Art-making and the training that preceded it was an intensely expensive activity. Those women artists who did succeed were usually from wealthy backgrounds, whether through marriage or inheritance. In other cases, the lack of female artists was largely due to gender biases in society and also the dismissing of their work as ‘craft’ rather than ‘fine art’. It is precisely this that UNDEREXPOSED takes as its starting point. Through the medium of print, it attempts to elevate and shed light on the work of female artists, past and present.

The works are almost entirely by artists of the 20th century and the present day given the relatively limited availability of older works accessible by curators and University of Kent students Lynne Dickens and Frances Chiverton. However, a wonderful print of a Holy Family (c. 1575) by Diana Ghisi did make it into the show under the generosity of Dr Ben Thomas. Ghisi, also known as Diana Scultori, was an Italian Renaissance engraver who is recorded as being the first female artist allowed to sell her own work under her own name. The inclusion of this print stands out as a historically significant statement amongst the rest of the works that women artists did exist and succeed before the 19th century.

Just around the corner of the same wall are two prints by Berthe Morisot and Mary Cassatt, kindly lent from the Victoria & Albert Museum Print Collection. Both artists were deeply involved with the Impressionists during the late 19th century, the former being well acquainted with Édouard Manet, the latter with Edgar Degas. Thematically, their work focuses on the culturally restricted lives of women, evident in Morisot’s choice of domestic settings and Cassatt’s specific interest in mothers and children as subjects. Unlike their male counterparts, these women provide us with a glimpse of women’s private lives from the perspective of one who is also restricted by the same rules as imposed by society. These artists have empathy for their subjects. You can almost feel their unspoken pain in the vacant expression of the fan-holding subject in Cassatt’s Tea (1890).

This exhibition attempts to provide the viewer with a small sample that displays the richness and variety of ideas and techniques exploited by these artists. Towards the latter end of the 20th century we have seen a flourish of successful women artists. Royal Academicians like Anne Desmet – whose Babel Tower in Pieces (1999) is one of three pieces in the exhibition – are examples of women’s recognition within the art world – and society – as artists worthy of praise. Tracey Emin’s appointment in 2011 as one of two Professors of Drawing at the Royal Academy of Arts since its founding is proof of this. One of her autobiographical prints proudly hangs in the foyer of the School of Arts building beside an edition of the Guerrilla Girls’ Do Women STILL Have to be Naked to Get Into the Met. Museum? (2012).

Artists exhibited in the show include Kent University alumni Dawn Cole whose solar plate etchings allude to pieces of white lace. Her series Reading Between the Lines take passages from a diary written by her great aunt during her time as a WW1 Voluntary Aid Detachment nurse. The diary records some of the wartime horrors and incidents at the hospital, and passages like “Men had their eyes removed” are interwoven into the lace-like patterns of Cole’s work.

Gwen Raverat proved to be a fast favourite at the private view, while others took interest in Barbara Hepworth’s minimalist lithographs and screenprints. Charlotte Cornish’s vivid abstractions raised a few eyebrows too, and what a pleasure it was to see some of Bridget Riley’s works – Frieze (2000), Two Blues (2003), Composition with Circles (no. 5) (2005) – whose conceptions are always made with the medium in mind, taking into account their size and effect on the viewer.

However, big names like Sarah Lucas weren’t necessarily the most popular as evidenced by Lucy Farley’s silkscreen print To the Lighthouse, Ile de Re (2013) – directly opposite the former’s Squab Squaw (2011) and Sarah Hardacre’s openly controversial screenprints of women in urban settings – generating much discussion among visitors to the exhibition. Farley studied BA Fine Art in 2001 at Central St. Martins and specialised in printmaking at the Royal College of Art in 2007. She is currently undergoing a fellowship at the Royal Academy of Arts and she has exhibited in several small-scale group shows over the years. The subject of her work is usually urban and rural locations with a great degree of expressiveness, bold use of black lines and atmospheric choice of colours, contrasting very well with the almost photographic quality of Alison Wilding’s lithographs of Starlings (2005).

For figurative art there is a concentrated display of prints by Eileen Cooper, Anita Klein and Ana Maria Pacheco. These prints have a particular focus on women with the first two often incorporating the same figure in a large body of work. Cooper’s linocuts tend to be psychological at first glance – some might say surreal, others even Freudian. Their content is a mix between fantasy and reality with titles like The Moon, The Bird and The Bride (1992) and Walking on Air (2005). Her recurring figure is a naked woman. Klein, on the other hand, uses a clothed figure. Her themes often revolve around the idea of beauty in art and everyday life such as nature, romance, family and birds. The prints displayed in the exhibition – The Goddess of the Pear Tree (2013) and The Spider (2013) – are part of the former category. In an interview in 2011, Klein said that she “grew up with a very strong sense of possibility of everything being taken away…I know that what I would miss are the very small things like having breakfast with my family, cleaning our teeth together… not holidays or birthdays or the photo-album version of life. Not the things we record but things that go past, slip through our fingers, things we don’t manage to enjoy”. It is in the ordinary in which we find the most happiness and create the most memories.

This exhibition has a certain lightness to it, perhaps due to the variety of its displays. A range of techniques and media are explored here – woodcuts, linocuts, screenprinting, photo-etching, engraving – and the content is just as diverse – people, houses, sea, sky, nature, society, abstract forms – and it keeps on going. Not only does this show women’s freedom in exploiting the possibilities of art-making but also the analogous diversity in printmaking itself when compared to painting or sculpture. From a method used to allow artists to advertise and promote their art, as cheap reproductions of paintings – or labour-intensive equivalents to present-day postcards – to the idea of prints as a medium and original work of art in its own right. The exhibition is a celebration of women’s recognition in the art world and printmaking’s infinite possibilities; two understated aspects of society combined to create something beautiful and perhaps even moving.

UNDEREXPOSED: Female artists and the medium of print runs until 19th June 2014 at Studio 3 Gallery, University of Kent, Canterbury, Kent. http://blogs.kent.ac.uk/studio3gallery/past-exhibitions/underexposed/

 

 

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UNDEREXPOSED – SERIES OF TALKS

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FREE lectures by leading experts – guarantee your seat today or it may be standing room only!
Making a difference. Women artists as printmakers by Gill Saunders, Senior Curator (Prints), Victoria & Albert Museum
Saturday, 17 May 2014 from 10:30 to 12:00
Paula Rego as Printmaker by Paul Coldwell, artist and Professor in Fine Art at the University of the Arts London
Thursday, 22 May 2014 from 18:00 to 20:00
The different techniques of printmaking by contemporary artist and Kent alumna Dawn Cole
Saturday, 24 May 2014 from 14:00 to 16:00
Gwen Raverat: her history, wood engravings and circle of friends by her grandson, William Pryor
Saturday, 31 May 2014 from 14:00 to 16:00
Biting through: the relationship between etchings, lithographs and screenprints and my kinetic sculpture by Liliane Lijn
Saturday, 7 June 2014 from 14:00 to 16:00
Black, white and one: developing a print portfolio from artwork to gallery by Fiona de Bulat, artist, lecturer and cofounder of ‘DBA editions’ print studio
Thursday, 12 June 2014 from 18:00 to 20:00
‘Beauty in art’ and ‘My printmaking techniques’ by the celebrated artist Anita Klein PPRE Hon RWS
Saturday, 14 June 2014 from 14:00 to 16:00

 

Alfred Drury's studio c. 1899

COMING SOON TO STUDIO 3 GALLERY: ALFRED DRURY

ALFRED DRURY AND THE NEW SCULPTURE

 

Alfred Drury, Griselda (1896)

 

Studio 3 Gallery, School of Arts, University of Kent:

30 September – 20 December 2013

 

The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery, University of Leeds:

15 January – 13 April 2014

 

Studio 3 Gallery is delighted to announce a major new exhibition dedicated to the art of one of the leading sculptors of the late Victorian and Edwardian period: Alfred Drury. The exhibition will show Drury’s most important sculptural works on a smaller scale – including his most characteristic masterpieces Griselda, The Age of Innocence and Lilith – thanks to generous loans from private collections. The exhibition, which will move on in the New Year to The Stanley & Audrey Burton Gallery in Leeds, is supported by grants from the Paul Mellon Centre for Studies in British Art, the Henry Moore Foundation and the Leeds Art Fund.

 

A fully illustrated catalogue with contributions by Benedict Read, Jolyon Drury, Brian Landy, Jane Winfrey and the exhibition curator Ben Thomas will be published to accompany the exhibition, and which presents new research on the artist. The catalogue is published thanks to the generosity of the Leeds Art Fund – Susan Beattie Memorial.

 

A display of drawings by Alfred Stevens – ‘England’s Michelangelo’ – from Drury’s collection will accompany this exhibition at The Beaney House of Art and Knowledge in Canterbury from 21 September to 1 December 2013:

 

http://www.canterbury.co.uk/Beaney/whats_on/Canterbury-‘England’s-Michelangelo’-Alfred-Stevens-at-The-Beaney-House-of-Art-Knowledge/details/?dms=13&venue=3036870&feature=1148

 

A related exhibition on Alfred Drury is currently running at the Henry Moore Institute in Leeds until 20 October 2013, The Age of Innocence: Replicating the Ideal Portrait in the New Sculpture Movement:

 

http://www.henry-moore.org/hmi/exhibitions/the-age-of-innocence

 

Alfred Drury, The Age of Innocence (1897)

 

The aim of the exhibition Alfred Drury and the New Sculpture is to review the art and life of Alfred Drury (1856-1944), the formative influences on his sculptural practice, and his role in the New Sculpture movement of the late Nineteenth and early Twentieth centuries. Drury is due a reappraisal. Recent writing on the New Sculpture has tended to follow the lead of Edmund Gosse’s influential articles in the Art Journal of 1894, which saw Frederick Leighton and George Frederic Watts as initiating a reform of British sculpture that reached its zenith in the work of Alfred Gilbert and William Hamo Thornycroft. Gosse barely mentioned Drury, dismissing him as ‘a mannered Kensington student, somewhat under the influence of Dalou’.

 

Arguably, however, Drury was one of the central figures in the New Sculpture movement because he combined in his art the realism of the great French sculptor Aimé-Jules Dalou (1838-1902), with whom he had a long professional relationship, and the Michelangelo-esque vision of Alfred Stevens (1818-75), whose art he revered and whose drawings he collected. Dalou and Stevens were seen as the key influences in the reform of British sculpture by a slightly later generation of critics to Gosse, including Marion H. Spielmann and Kineton Parkes. Drury was recognised by Spielmann as ‘one of the most distinguished’ of the group of British artists taught by the exiled communard Dalou, and according to Parkes, Drury’s ‘adherence to Stevens has never wavered’ so that ‘in his work he is a direct descendant of the great sculptor-painter-designer, and is therefore in the direct line of English sculptural development’. The neglect of Drury’s art may also have been partly due to its languorous beauty, eschewing muscular heroics and decorative excesses. By contrast with Leighton and Thornycroft, Drury ‘cares little for vigour, passion or anatomical display’, argued Spielmann, but instead ‘seeks the graceful, the placid, and the harmonious’.

 

Alongside sculptural works by Alfred Drury, the exhibition will display paintings and medals by the artist, and also documents and photographs from the period. The exhibition will also include works by Aimé Jules Dalou, Auguste Rodin, Lord Leighton, and Alfred Stevens.

 

Alfred Drury's studio c. 1899