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Joy of Code videos in German

Do you want to learn programming with Greenfoot? Do you speak German? Is your German better than your English?

Then this may be your lucky day.

Frajo Ligmann, a school teacher near Aachen, Germany, has started to produce German language versions of the Joy Of Code videos. At time of writing, he has produced six videos already, which you can see on his Youtube channel. And he is working on more, which should appear as time goes on.

Producing videos is a lot of work and very time intensive, so be a bit patient if you’re itching to see more. If you’re happy to watch these in German, bookmark his page and leave him a comment, either on his page or right here below this post.

Many thanks to Frajo Ligmann for this amazing contribution to our community!

 

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Blackbox is now live

About a year ago, I wrote about a new project we were starting: Blackbox. Back then, we had a plan and some goals. Now we have reached the next step: Blackbox is now live.

A few weeks ago, we released BlueJ 3.1.0, which now incorporates Blackbox. We are now collecting data from all participating BlueJ users with the goal of making that data available to research projects. Neil Brown (@twistedsq), who has done most of the work on the implementation, has just published a blog post on this – go and read it for more detail.

In short, we are currently collecting data from 25,000 users who have agreed to participate, and expect to extend that to over 100,000 within three months.

Some more information about the data collected and how it is done, look here.

If you are a computing education researcher at a recognised research institution, you can request access to this data. To do this, please mail us at  blackbox-admin@bluej.org.

 

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Do you want to work on BlueJ/Greenfoot? We’re hiring!

The BlueJ/Greenfoot team are quite a small outfit (currently four people), but we are looking to hire two more team members.

The official job advert is here, but there’s a better starting point if you’re interested: Neil, one of our team members, has just written a blog post about these two new positions. Read this first, and then get in touch if you think this might be for you!

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JoC #33: Playing Breakout! Collision detection

      Finagles’ 8th Rule: Teamwork is essential; it allows you to blame someone else.

Today, we’re finally getting our breakout game into a playable state! Yes!!

See how to implement functionality to recognise when the ball hits a block, and make the block disappear. This is really the centrepiece of our program – from now on, everything else is detail.

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Concepts discussedcollision detection, removing an object from the world

Download (scenario as of beginning of this episode): breakout-v7.zip

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JoC #32: Pretty pictures with while loops

      90% Rule of Project Schedules: “The first 90% of the task takes 90%
      of the time, and the last 10% takes the other 90%.”
            — (source unknown) 

One more time, discussions of loops.

Loops are such an important concept, and there are so many variations, that it is really important to get practice with them and get them properly into your head. To this end, we’re looking one more time at loops here before moving on to some new concepts in the next episode.

Today, we’re using a really important, fundamental loop pattern: A while loop with a simple loop counter. It looks like this:

    int i = 0;
    while (i < NUMBER)
    {
        doSomething();
        i = i + 1;
    }

Watch the video, and try to memorize this pattern. It will come in handy later!

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Concepts discussedloops, while loop

Download (scenario as of beginning of this episode): breakout-v6.zip

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