Professor Marialena Nikolopoulou becomes the new WIMEK visiting research fellow

The CASE Director, Professor Marialena Nikolopoulou has been awarded the competitive WIMEK visiting research fellowship.  She will be visiting Wageningen University, where she will be working with Dr Sanda Lenzholzer from the Landscape Architecture group, on urban climate and climate responsive design of outdoor space.

They are currently focusing on suitable methods to study the physical and psychological dimension of thermal perception and they are developing a special issue for the Journal of International Biometeorology.

Timothy Brittain-Catlin speaks on BBC1’s The Big Questions

BBC television’s live discussion programme The Big Questions was broadcast live this Sunday from the Colyer-Fergusson building at the University of Kent. The third of the three debates in the programme centred on whether the Church of England should protect its historic buildings as congregations dwindle. This came in the wake of the recent announcement by the Archbishop of Canterbury that some buildings, such as Guildford Cathedral, were ‘not too big to fail’. In Guildford the diocese had recently been prevented by residents, councillors and planners from building an estate of new houses along the south flank of the well known cathedral, designed by Edqard Maufe in 1932. Timothy Brittain-Catlin spoke as the Deputy Chairman of the Twentieth Century Society, the national amenity organisation, and the author Sir Simon Jenkins, formerly Chairman of the National Trust for England and Wales and now a trustee of the Churches Conservation Trust, also participated. The programme is seen by around 1 million viewers.

The programme is available here on the BBC I-Player until 9 April and the discussion on church buildings starts at 42’20”.

Kent School of Architecture Summer School 2017

The University of Kent’s high-quality postgraduate-level summer schools with academic credit are designed for anyone who would like to study one or more of the inspiring courses taught at the University’s locations in three of Europe’s most important cities.

Building on our reputation for interdisciplinary study you will spend time with fellow students and academics studying your chosen subject in specially chosen locations with state-of-the-art facilities.  If you are considering postgraduate study at Kent, either in the UK or at one of our specialist postgraduate centres across Europe, a summer school is a great opportunity to discover more about your subject and the University.

The Summer Schools are two weeks long and run in June, July and August 2017, allowing you to attend one or more, and discover what it is like to be a student at our Canterbury, Brussels or Paris locations.

Kent School of Architecture will be running an Architecture Summer School at the Canterbury Campus from the 2nd – 16th July 2017. Take part in presentations, design workshops, lectures and site visits and become part of a creative community that comprises of well-respected researchers, highly skilled architects, engineers and design professionals.

Studying at a summer school with the University of Kent, ranked 23 out of 119 institutions in the UK (Guardian University Guide 2017), you will benefit from expert teaching, on-campus accommodation (in Canterbury), social activities, excellent resources and facilities and an opportunity to enhance your career or progress to postgraduate study.

Scholarships and discounts

  • We have a limited number of full and part scholarships to award.
  • Tiered discounts when studying more than one course.
  • Discounts of £150 if you book and pay in full by 5 May 2017
  • Brussels Summer School students are entitled to 10% discount if they subsequently enrol on a Master’s degree at the Brussels centre.

Find out more: www.kent.ac.uk/summerschools

Contact us: summerschools@kent.ac.uk

Stage 3 KSA student to speak at TED x University of Kent

TED is a non-profit organisation devoted to Ideas Worth Spreading. As part of the TED x University of Kent event taking place this Saturday 14th May in the Gulbenkian Theatre, Stage 3 student and KSA blog contributor Luisa Pereira-Pires will be speaking about her experiences at her time spent helping out with the Falafel Group in Lesvos. For more information about the event, and Luisa’s talk, please click here.

luisa

Architecture hosts open lectures for the 50th Festival weekend

On Saturday 5th September, Professor Gerald Adler and Dr Henrik Schoenefeldt will be giving lectures as part of the 50 Festival celebrations. Both lectures are open to all and there is no need to pre-book your place.

11am to 12pm – Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1

Professor Gerald Adler – Fifty years of campus design. The University of Kent’s Canterbury campus index of British architecture.

The 1960s, ’70s, ’80s. ’90s and noughties was a period of unprecedented growth in UK higher education. How was its burgeoning population of students, academics and support staff accommodated? This lecture examines key buildings on the Canterbury campus, and demonstrates how they exemplify the architecture of the British New Universities that stand, more generally, for the changing character of buildings in the UK in the five decades since the establishment of the University of Kent.

2pm to 3pm – Marlowe Lecture Theatre 1

Dr. Henrik Schoenefeldt – Between Science and Politics How Victorian scientists developed and assessed the House of Commons’ ventilation system

Dr. Schoenefeldt’s new research reveals how Victorian scientists developed the House of Commons’ historic ventilation system, following a process that was not concerned with technical questions alone but was also highly political. Scientists were confronted with the nearly impossible challenge of maintaining a climate and atmosphere that would satisfy all parties occupying the debating chamber.

Please visit the official 50 Festival website for further event details.

KSA End of Year Exhibition

11cOn the Friday 19th of June 2015 at 5:30pm, the Kent School of Architecture hosted its 10th End of Year Exhibition. The show comprised work of all 5 years as well as additional work from foundation and postgraduate years. The Marlowe building on the University of Kent campus (marked using an enormous pink X to symbolise the number 10) was unsurprisingly bursting at the seams with high quality work and scores of people who had travelled to see it.

11

The exhibition was officially opened by special guest and Architects Journal Editor Rory  Olcayto who spoke shortly about the need for high quality schools of architecture and about the nature of architectural education itself.

The evening then progressed to the presentation of prizes including the Eliot Cloister design competition winners prize for Prinka Anandawardhani and Tracy Hulley, presented by Eliot College Master Stephen Burke. There were many other prizes awarded by the school and also sponsors including an award from Guy Holloway for Stage 2’s module Form and Structure. Guests who were in attendance commented on the richness and quality of the work on show, and their delight at how quickly the young school is progressing.

Also on show were the schools latest technological advancements including 3D printers, scanners and a drone in the foyer.

The Kent School of Architecture is in a constant state of progression, in both reputation and therefore quality of work, which means that future end of year exhibitions will continue to rise in quality. We look forward to seeing you all there next year!

By Edward Powe – Stage 2 BA (Hons) Architecture

Billhook Nook Theatre by SHED

There are few opportunities when studying architecture to translate your designs into built projects, except if you actively seek those projects which allow you to do so. This extracurricular project gave us an opportunity to put our design skills to the test and produce a multifunctional events space for use by both staff and future students. The theatre took about 2-3 weeks to complete and has inspired many of us to seek future projects with which we can develop our skills further. The difference between working as a team on an academic project compared to an active, built project is significant, and we have all learnt valuable lessons about both team work and designing as a result.

29

The theatre concept originated from the study of popular natural artist Andy Goldsworthy and his technique of ‘ordering’ nature using materials found on site. Billhook Nook Theatre consists of a large sculptural roof structure designed to represent the ‘ordered’ interpretation of the surrounding woodland. This ‘birds nest’ form is built around a triangular structural frame which is then supported using chains by the surrounding trees. The benefit of securing the structure to the trees is that the roof, although static, moves gentle with the trees in the wind adding a dynamic character to the theatre (unlike many traditional theatres). The theatre is also intended to not only draw your attention to the focal point (in this case the stage area), but to draw your eye up to the canopy of leaves above.

Billhook Nook Theatre 22

The SHED (Studio for Hands-on Experimental Design) team, led by myself currently includes second year students Benjamin Nourse, Aut Angpanitcharoen, Luisa Pires, Andrew Warwick and Prinka Anandawardhani Choesin. We all look forward to experiencing Billhook Nook Theatre throughout the seasons, and we encourage everyone else to do the same as it will soon be available as a bookable education space on campus. The theatre can be found below the new business school development near parkwood on campus, just look for the door.

This project would not have been possible without the help of Creative Campus and Ian Bride, and we look forward to future projects together.

By Edward Powe – Stage 2 BA (Hons) Architecture

 

Architecture Student Aut Angpanitcharoen’s Travel Diary

1

Just before the exam I took a trip to the beach with a couple of friends for an afternoon of revision, tea, oysters and eventually dinner. Whitstable turned out to be a great venue for reading, although if you are planning on doing this yourself, do remember to bring paperweights with you.

The beach can get pretty windy and wet notes aren’t quite as informative as dry ones.

2

After the stress of the Nineteenth Century Architecture exam and the final structural report hand in passed, I found myself with plenty of free time to start enjoying life again. So I picked up my sketchbook and my favourite watercolour set and have been busy. Well, not that busy.

Yesterday whilst waiting for the clock to strike seven, I got bored and decided to go for a stroll around the city centre. I have to admit it wasn’t the best day for a walk, hence I only ended up with this fairly quick sketch. The line work is particularly rushed as by the time I decided to put pen to paper, I was already late for dinner.

This is one of my favourite spot in Canterbury, the cobbled narrow street and shop signs frame Bell Harry perfectly.

3

I have been drawing the cathedral a lot recently. Just a few days ago, fellow aspiring architect, Prinka Anandawardhani and I took an impromptu visit to the cloisters and spent half an hour sketching. Hers is a little better than mine so I chose to omit a scan of it to avoid competition.

4

The restoration process for the cathedral is forever on going, the result of the successful “Save Canterbury Cathedral” Appeal launched in 2006. Though it is a shame that in order to save it, parts of the building and its surrounding complex has to be covered up. It was slightly frustrating that when my friends came for a day visit, Christ Church Gate was concealed behind scaffoldings and tatty white fabric. Well guys, if you’re reading this, here it is. Through my eyes. For more accurate representations go to google images.

http://www.canterbury-cathedral.org/supporting-us/

5

Finally, to end this ramble. My favourite sketch at the moment, this one of St Paul’s Cathedral from the 1 New Change rooftop, right by St Paul’s station. I would seriously recommend going there for a great view of London and a day out sketching.

6

By Aut Angpanitcharoen – Stage 2 BA (Hons) Architecture

KSA ranked 3rd best school of architecture in the UK in most recent league table

The most recent Gardian university league table has seen the Kent School of Architecture (KSA) rise to 3rd position in the UK, up 11 places from last year. It is particularly worth noting that KSA, which only celebrates its 10th anniversary this year, is positioned above some of the longest standing architecture schools in the country such as Cambridge and Bath. A highly contributing factor to KSA’s success is the high employability standards it provides students with, ranked joint 1st for graduating student employment prospects in the 2016 Complete University Guide. As well as this, recent expansions to KSA mean that it now boast some of the most up to date facilities available to its Architectural students.

It is quite clear that for such a young school, KSA is punching above its weight when it comes to providing exceptional architectural education and is now perfectly positioned to maintain its position as a frontrunner in the Architectural field.

Work Experience

Instead of spending my Easter holidays relaxing on a beach in South Devon with a cream tea at my side, I used this time as an opportunity to undertake some work experience with an architectural firm who specialise in the design of tourist attractions. Although at first reluctant to give up the only free time I had after a very busy term, I soon came to realise the benefits of my decision.

University learning is a vital part of the process to becoming a good architect, but it has its limitations, the first being the disconnection between students and active building projects. This means that while learning at university you may think that what you are doing is worthwhile, but it is not until you enter the industry that you realise what the most important processes are and therefore which skill areas are most worthwhile to develop. It’s like trying to paint someone’s portrait before ever seeing them. If it were up to me to decide, I believe that a degree in architecture should start with compulsory work in practice before theoretical learning begins, this however for obvious reasons is not the case in our current system. Now having spend time studying the profession I am in a better position to judge which skills are require and which are less so. This also means that I can now relate the projects I undertake at university to the real world subsequently giving my university work more depth and realism.

Another benefit to getting into the industry early is what is known as getting your ‘foot in the door.’ It is basic business that dictates it is more cost effective to keep an employee on than to train a new one, therefore as soon as you begin to learn company specific processes, you are making yourself very attractive when it comes to longer term planning. What I mean by this is that by getting into a firm early, knowingly or not, you are making the search for a year out position much easier when it comes to that time. While others are having the last minute panic as third year comes to an end, you can relax knowing that yours is already sorted.

Although I have not developed my design skills very much, I believe that I have learnt more about the processes involved in the architectural profession in those 3 weeks than I have done this year at university, and I would encourage everyone to do the same.

By Edward Powe – Stage 2 BA (Hons) Architecture