Thomas Becket and the Medieval Cult of Personality

On Tuesday 6 June, both the School of History and Centre for Medieval and Early Modern Studies (MEMS) of the University of Kent are delighted to welcome Professor Paul Binski (Cambridge) for a free public lecture in the Clagett Auditorium of the Canterbury Cathedral Lodge from 6.30–7.30PM.

The title of his paper is Thomas Becket and the Medieval Cult of Personality

This lecture will examine the art provoked by the drama of Thomas Becket’s Life, Death and Sanctity. It will look at Becket’s place amongst the other saints of England and Europe, and particularly at the idea of personality cult and charisma. How did such things impact on the way saints were represented in the Gothic age and what difference did Becket make?

Please visit the lecture event page for more details.

‘Never Complain, Never Explain’: British Foreign Policy in the Twentieth Century

Professor Gaynor Johnson to deliver KIASH Inaugural Professorial Lecture

The Foreign Office Locarno Suite: ‘Drawing room for the Nation’.

The Foreign Office Locarno Suite: ‘Drawing room for the Nation’.

The School of History’s Professor Gaynor Johnson will present the latest lecture in the KIASH Inaugural Professorial Lecture series on Wednesday 20th May at 6pm in Grimond Lecture Theatre 1, located on the University of Kent’s Canterbury campus.

Professor Gaynor JohnsonThe aim of this lecture is to offer an overview of the principal trends in the evolution of international history as a sub-discipline of history. To examine its relation to other areas of history and to place it within the wider context of other subject areas that also examine how states relate to one another, for example, international relations and law.’ The lecture will then explore some of the main historiographical debates on twentieth century British foreign policy and what they reveal about how much we know or otherwise about those subjects. Finally, some thoughts will be offered about the direction in which the study of recent British foreign policy is likely to develop.’

– Professor Gaynor Johnson

Titled ‘Never Complain, Never Explain’: British Foreign Policy in the Twentieth Century, Professor Johnson’s lecture is a free event, open to all and will be followed by a drinks reception in the foyer of the Grimond Building.

For more information about this and other School of History events please visit our events calendar.

For more information about Professor Johnson please visit her profile on the School of History website.

A poster for the event is now available to download (pdf).

Update: Professor Johnson’s inaugural lecture is now available as a podcast (mp3).

An accompanying presentation is also available to download (pdf)

Undergraduate students give lecture at The Beaney

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Left-right: The Beaney’s Martin Crowther, with students Thomas Knight, Rianna Lofts, Louise Jarrold, Lisa Jermy, Beth Gregory, Ciara Kempson and Marina Spiteri.

Congratulations to a group of History undergraduates who presented a successful lecture at The Beaney House of Art and Knowledge in Canterbury.

The group of seven students, all studying on the module Victorian Britain, researched the history of some of the more unusual items in the museum, from a pair of silk Afghan trousers and an electro-magnetic medical machine, to a Parisian doll and a homemade scrap screen.

Their lecture, Victorian Objects: Stories about Museum Artefacts, was held on Thursday 5 June at the gallery, with a large number of visitors attending to hear abuot their work.

Dr Don Leggett has been leading the project with the students, all currently in their second year of studying BA History.

Pictured above, left-right: The Beaney’s Martin Crowther, with students Thomas Knight, Rianna Lofts, Louise Jarrold, Lisa Jermy, Beth Gregory, Ciara Kempson and Marina Spiteri.