‘Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Material Culture’: South East Hub Conference 2016

The University of Kent is again hosting this years’ South East Hub Conference, which will be on ‘Interdisciplinary Perspectives on Material Culture’, and is to be held on Thursday 9th June 2016.

This one-day conference hosted at the University of Kent’s Canterbury campus brings together a range of research on material culture in Britain and the wider world. It will include a Special Collections workshop led by Dr. Emily Guerry, as well as a variety of panels led by postgraduate researchers, with broad themes covering: methodological practice, material and cultural exchange, symbolism, and myth and memory in materiality. Our keynote, Professor Nicholas Saunders, will be delivering a lecture in the afternoon..

The full programme can be viewed below, and has been selected to give consideration to the variable ways of approaching material studies across a range of disciplines.

The Conference is free to attend, and is open to all postgraduate and academic staff interested in, or studying issues within material culture. Lunch and refreshments are provided. Please register your attendance by emailing SEHub2016@gmail.com by Thursday 2nd June, including your name, institution and area of research.

Places are limited for Dr Guerry’s session in Special Collections and, therefore, will be allocated on a first come first served basis. However, those unable to attend the morning session are welcome to register to attend the rest of the conference.

Conference Programme

Time Programme
9.30-10.30 Registration & Refreshments
10.30-12.00 Workshop with Dr Emily Guerry (University of Kent)
12.00-1.30 Panel 1 & 2
1.30-2.30 Lunch
2.30-4.00 Panel 3 & 4
4.00-4.30 Coffee break
4.30-6.00 Keynote Lecture by Professor Nicholas Saunders (Bristol University)

 

Panel One: Methodological practices in material studies

Name Paper
Harriet Dorling ‘Neither flesh nor fleshless’ (Four Quartets, T.S. Eliot):

Methodological considerations for the interdisciplinary use of material object studies and literature

 

Hannah Lilley William Burch’s Artisanal Material Practice and the Making of his Master’s Manuscript

 

Rebecca Smith Rubber stamps, chinagraph, captions and coffee stains: Exploring bureaucracy through materiality in the Daily Herald picture library

 

 

Panel Two: Symbolism and materiality

Name Paper
Nicholas Blower Comfort in the Ephemeral: Environmentalist Effigies and Communal Agency in Southern Utah
Amy Hammett The Clay balls of Ancient Egypt: A Rite of Passage?
Holly Winter Engraving Seringapatam War Trophies and the Construction of British Militaristic Masculinities in Colonial India, 1799-1857

 

Panel Three: Material and cultural exchange

Name Paper
Colin Elder “The staple of the place, are the white fish and maple sugar, and some few, but not many, furs.”: Movement and circulation of material objects in the nineteenth century, and their meanings and status in the Upper Great Lakes
Gumring Hkangda Museum Objects and Indigenous Knowledge: methodological and epistemological perspectives in the case of researching the mainland Southeast Asia ethnographic materials at the British Museum
Rachael Morton Perceptions of Quality Metalware in Eighteenth-Century England

 

 

Panel Four: Myth, memory and materiality

Name Paper
Alina Kozlovski Pillars of time: Fragmenting the past and present in the ancient Roman landscape
Bisma Khan Architecture and Literature in the construction of memory, specifically, the Orient in in eighteenth century England
Melissa Bennett ‘Made of poor fighting material’: The photographic presentation of the martial qualities of the West India Regiment during the Sierra Leone Hut Tax War of 1898

 

 

 

British Human Rights Organizations & Soviet Dissent, 1965-1985

Congratulations to our Research Support Officer and Honorary Research Fellow Dr Mark Hurst, whose book ‘British Human Rights Organizations & Soviet Dissent, 1965-1985‘ was released by Bloomsbury today!9781472522344 (002)

The book explores the British response to Soviet human rights violation, drawing on Dr Hurst’s extensive archival work and interviews with key individuals from the period.

In the latter half of the 20th century, a number of dissidents engaged in a series of campaigns against the Soviet authorities and as a result were subjected to an array of cruel and violent punishments.

A collection of like-minded activists in Britain campaigned on their behalf, and formed a variety of organizations to publicise their plight. British Human Rights Organizations and Soviet Dissent, 1965-1985 examines the efforts of these activists, exploring how influential their activism was in shaping the wider public awareness of Soviet human rights violations in the context of the Cold War.

Find out more here.