Public debate ‘Democracy and the Common Good: What do we Value?’ – 19 March 2018

Dr Pabst, Reader in Politics in the School of Politics and International Relations, says Brexit has raised many questions about what is going to happen regarding free movement.

The free movement of people and capital is considered fundamental to the global economy, but it has also led to widespread feelings of economic and cultural insecurity. Attempts to address this often rely on ideas about the freedom of choice for the individual or economic utility – the benefits or costs for the majority.

Dr Pabst’s report, ‘Democracy and the Common Good: A Common Good Approach to Free Movement of People and Capital’, published by St Paul’s Institute, seeks to advance an alternative approach.

It advocates addressing existing anxieties and providing a source of fresh policy ideas, adding to the ongoing work of communities, faith groups and others that mediate between the individual and the state.

The report features a foreword by Rachel Reeves MP who chairs the Business, Energy and Industrial Strategy Select Committee. She says that it is right that this report focuses on skills, investment and the need for closer consideration of communities in the everyday economy. She also adds that at what may only be the start of a long process of imagining and constructing an alternative to a broken economic model, this pamphlet is an important contribution to the debate.

Dr Pabst’s report will be launched as part of a public debate entitled Democracy and the Common Good: What do we Value? at St Paul’s Cathedral on Monday 19 March from 6.45pm until 8.30pm.

This debate will be moderated by Michael Sandel, the BBC’s global philosopher who will engage a conversation with a diverse group of students. Also taking part will be Professor Fran Tonkiss (LSE) and Graham Tomlin, the Bishop of Kensington where the Grenfell disaster took place last June.

Journalists and members of the public are welcome and can sign up at 

https://www.eventbrite.co.uk/e/democracy-and-the-common-good-what-do-we-value-tickets-42418442704

Posted in events, news | Leave a comment

The Future of Work seminar series

Following rescheduling due to the ongoing UCU industrial action, we are very happy to announce the final schedule for the seminar series The Future of Work. Details on speakers, titles and rooms can be found below and on the attached poster – The Future of Work seminar series

All University staff and students are welcome to attend, and please feel free to distribute to any networks, lists or individuals you feel may be interested.

Don’t hesitate to get in touch (b.turner@kent.ac.uk) if you have any questions.

Thursday 22nd March 2018,17:00-19:00, RLT2

Valeria Graziano (Coventry University) and Kim Trogal (University of the Creative Arts, Canterbury): ‘On repair movements, domestic fantasies and antiwork politics?’

Wednesday 28th March 2018, 15:00-17:00, KS13

Dawn Lyon (UoK) ‘Making a future that counts: Young people’s narratives of working futures in a post-industrial landscape.’

Wednesday 9th May 2018, 15:00-17:0,0 W1-SR6

David Frayne (Cardiff University): ‘Capitalism and the Politics of Free-Time’

Wednesday 16th May 2018. 15:00-17:00, W1-SR6

David Bates (Canterbury Christ Church University): ‘Immaterial Labour, Exploitation and the Refusal of Work.’

Tuesday 22nd May 2018, 17:00-19:00, RLT2

Annalise Murgia (University of Leeds): ‘Experiencing Precariousness in the Hybrid Areas of Work: The Case of Italy.’

Posted in events, news | Leave a comment

Book launch, 6 December at 6pm – Lenin Lives! Reimagining the Russian Revolution 1917-2017

You are cordially invited to the University of Kent launch of Dr Philip Cunliffe‘s new book: Lenin Lives! Reimagining the Russian Revolution 1917-2017

Book Launch for Lenin Lives! Reimagining the Russian Revolution 1917-2017. Zero Books (2017)

6pm, Wednesday 6 December 2017

University of Kent, Keynes College, Seminar room 17 (KS17)

What if the Russian Revolution had succeeded in spreading beyond the borders of Russia as intended by the Bolshevik revolutionaries over 100 years ago? What would a different twentieth century have looked like? This is the premise of this new book, published in September 2017 by Zero books. No tale of the Russian Revolution is complete without asking ‘what if …?’

The Canterbury book launch will be on Wednesday 6 December in Keynes Seminar Room 17 on the Canterbury campus of the University of Kent. Come along for a free drink and for a brief introduction to the themes of the book. Discounted copies of the book will also be available for purchase. This event is free and open to all (university staff, students and the general public). No booking necessary

Posted in events, news | Leave a comment

Centre for Critical Thought Lecture by Dr Steve Klee (Lincoln) – 1 December 2017, 5pm, DLT2

Centre for Critical Thought Lecture by Dr Steve Klee (Lincoln) – 1 December 2017, 5pm, DLT2

The Centre for Critical Thought is delighted to invite you to a lecture which will be delivered by Dr Steve Klee (Lincoln) on Friday 1 December 2017 at 5pm in Darwin Lecture Theatre 2 entitled ‘Realist Aesthetics Contra Rancière’. The lecture will have broad appeal for those interested in the current turn towards realism in philosophy, in the work of Jacques Ranciere and in debates within contemporary aesthetics.

Dr Klee’s profile – https://staff.lincoln.ac.uk/05fbc325-9dd7-49b3-80ff-cc4c08cdc45f

All are welcome (University staff, students and the general public) and no booking is necessary.

CCT Lecture

Dr Steve Klee (Lincoln)

‘Realist Aesthetics Contra Rancière’

Day: Friday 1 December 2017

Time: 17.00 – 18.30

Room: Darwin Lecture Theatre 2

All are welcome (University staff, students and the general public) and no booking is necessary.

Posted in news | Leave a comment

Centre for Critical Thought Lecture by Dr Sean Molloy – 23 November 2017, 5pm, ELT2

All are welcome (University staff, students and the general public) and no booking is necessary.

CCT Lecture

Dr Sean Molloy

‘Removing the “The Foul Stain of Our Species”? Mankind, Providence and the Prospect of Salvation in Kant.’

Day: Thursday 23 November 2017

Time: 17.00 – 18.30

Room: Eliot Lecture Theatre 2

All are welcome (University staff, students and the general public) and no booking is necessary.

Details of Dr Sean Molloy’s new book on Kant’s International Relations can be found here – https://www.press.umich.edu/5036715/kants_international_relations

Posted in events, news, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

CCT Lecture by Dr Philip Cunliffe ‘Reflections on Lenin and the Russian Revolution 100 years on’ – 17 October 2017

Do come along for what promises to be a fascinating lecture.

Dr Philip Cunliffe

‘Reflections on Lenin and the Russian Revolution 100 years on’

Day: Tuesday 17 October

Time: 17.00 – 18.30

Room: Darwin Lecture Theatre 2

Open to all, no booking necessary

 More information about the book upon which this lecture is based can be found here:

 http://www.zero-books.net/books/lenin-lives

Posted in events, news, Uncategorized | Leave a comment

CCT Postgraduate Research Seminar: Conor Heaney, ‘Stupidity and Study in the Contemporary University’ 11/10/17, 3.30pm

‘Stupidity and Study in the Contemporary University’

Conor Heaney, Politics and International Relations (Kent)

Day: Wednesday 11 October

Time: 15.30 – 17.00

Room: TSR2 (Templeman Library Seminar Room 2)

All welcome!

 

Abstract

‘Will study be possible in the university-to-come? Or will it be necessary to abandon the university in order to study? In this paper, I confront these questions through an analysis of the relationship between stupidity and study in the university today. The first two sections of this paper are focused on exploring the concepts of stupidity and study. In §1 I explore stupidity, and further, systemic stupidity, through a combined reading of Gilles Deleuze and Bernard Stiegler. In §2 I explicate the notion of study – and the connected notions of debt, credit, and the undercommons – through Stefano Harney & Fred Moten. Following this, I go on to explore two particular modes of the practice of our contemporary stupidity in the university connected to everyday bureaucratic practices. Building on these two examples, I then go on to suggest and argue for two projects of study in the university-t​o-come. Ultimately, this paper seeks to help open up a conceptual-practical space for exploration of alternative futures for the university beyond its present of neocolonialism and stupidity.’

Posted in events, Postgraduate Seminar Series | Leave a comment

Guest Lecture with Paul Auerbach – ‘Social optimism: an alternative political economy for the 21st century’, 30/03/17

Centre for Critical Thought (CCT) talk with Paul Auerbach: Socialist optimism: an alternative political economy for the twenty-first century

Thursday 30 March 2017 at 17:00 in Grimond LT3

The Centre for Critical Thought invite you to their forthcoming talk with Paul Auerbach. Paul Auerbach, Reader in Economics at Kingston University, offers an alternative political economy for the twenty-first century in Socialist Optimism (Palgrave Macmillan, 2016). Socialism as human development gives a unity and direction to progressive policies that are otherwise seen to be a form of pragmatic tinkering in the context of a pervasive capitalist reality.

All are welcome to attend this talk, full details can be found here.

Posted in events, news | Leave a comment

Politics after Poststructuralism Seminar Series – Dr Martin Crowley, 10 March 2017, 5pm

Dr Martin Crowley (Reader in Modern French Thought and Culture, University of Cambridge)
Title: ‘Bernard Stiegler’s Automatic Politics’
Politics after Poststructuralism Seminar Series
Venue: Keynes seminar room 14
Date and Time: 10 March 2017, 5pm

Martin Crowley (University of Cambridge)

Martin is Reader in Modern French Thought and Culture at Cambridge, and has published books on Robert Antelme and Marguerite Duras, and more recently, essays on Jean-Luc Nancy and Bernard Stiegler.  He is currently working on the question of hybrid or distributed agency, in particular the political possibilities offered by approaches to this question in the work of Bruno Latour, Isabelle Stengers, Bernard Stiegler, and Catherine Malabou; this is part of a wider project on French and Francophone philosophy and contemporary geopolitics.

‘Bernard Stiegler’s Automatic Politics’

Abstract:

In the first volume of his La Société automatique (2015), Bernard Stiegler considers the social and philosophical implications of the predicted imminent increase in the proportion of labour undertaken by automata. The aim of this paper is to provide an account of Stiegler’s analyses, to situate these in the context of his philosophy more broadly, and to draw out their implications for an understanding of politics in what a widespread shorthand likes to refer to as the age of the machines.

For Stiegler, the interpenetration of human and technical forms of life is nothing new. Developing the work of André Leroi-Gourhan and Gilbert Simondon, Stiegler sees these forms as coming into existence through transductive processes of mutual constitution. The social and political questions posed by particular technologies are consequently to be understood as questions of adoption: the human beings of a given era are formed in relation to their technical objects, but can subsequently shape this relation by adopting these objects as either beneficial or harmful, in an immanent process of recursive self-fashioning.

It is in these terms that La Société automatique analyses the predicted explosion of automation. For Stiegler, the social stakes of this development concern the definition of work and the link between work and remuneration; the political challenge is accordingly to foster the adoption of emergent technical forms in such a way as to provide a beneficial solution to these social questions. The politics of automation at work here needs to be taken beyond the question of adoption, however, into regions which Stiegler does not explore. For the mutual constitution of the human and the technical may imply a potentially more problematic reconceptualization of effective political agency: not as a possibility belonging to one of these forms only, but rather as distributed across the transductive relations through which the forms emerge. Arguing nevertheless against the purely descriptive, post hoc accounts of such composite processes offered by a Jane Bennett or a Bruno Latour, the paper will seek to determine how the trenchant quality of political agency as Stiegler configures it can be maintained within such an understanding of its processual distribution; it will engage this problem with specific reference to the role of algorithmically-generated news feeds in the production of ‘post-truth’ politics.

Posted in events, news | Leave a comment

Politics after Poststructuralism Seminar Series – seminar with Dr Nick Srnicek – 23 February, 5pm

*THIS EVENT HAS HAD TO BE CANCELLED DUE TO TRAVEL DISRUPTIONS CAUSED BY WEATHER*

Dr Nick Srnicek (Lecturer in International Political Economy, City University of London)
Title: ‘Platform Capitalism’
Politics after Poststructuralism Seminar Series
Venue: Keynes seminar room 17
Date and Time: 23 February 2017, 5pm

Lecturer in International Political Economy, Nick Srnicek co-authored with Alex Williams  #Accelerate: Manifesto for an Accelerationist Politics ​(2013), ​Inventing the Future: Postcapitalism and a World Without Work (Verso, 2015), and the recently published Platform Capitalism (Polity, 2016). His current research is on anti-work politics and social reproduction, and how the two separate areas can be fit together.

‘Platform Capitalism’

Abstract:

What unites Google and Facebook, Apple and Microsoft, Siemens and GE, Uber and Airbnb? Across a wide range of sectors, these firms are transforming themselves into platforms: businesses that provide the hardware and software foundation for others to operate on. This transformation signals a major shift in how capitalist firms operate and how they interact with the rest of the economy: the emergence of platform capitalism. This talk critically examines these new business forms, showing how the fundamental foundations of the economy are rapidly being carved up among a small number of monopolistic platforms, and how the platform introduces new tendencies within capitalism that pose significant challenges to any vision of a post-capitalist future.

Posted in events, news | Leave a comment